Home Main Category Second Amendment/Politics

Do The Swiss Have the Best gun Laws?

Warmaster94Warmaster94 New MemberPosts: 20 New Member
Overview

The Weapons Act contains a comprehensive regime for the licensing of the acquisition and carrying of permitted weapons; the banning of certain weapons, including automatic firearms; and the production and trade in weapons, including the reporting obligations of dealers and a registration system that covers all privately owned guns, including those acquired by inheritance, but not including hunting rifles. The federal Weapons Act is implemented by the cantons and the cantons also keep registers of privately owned guns. The provisions on ammunition are in keeping with the principles of the Act, which aims to deter abuse while permitting lawful gunownership.

Acquisition of Guns

An acquisition license is required primarily for handguns. Rifles and semiautomatic long arms that are customarily used by recreational hunters are exempt from the licensing requirement, whereas fully automatic guns are banned. An applicant for a weapons license must be at least eighteen years of age, may not have been placed under guardianship, may not give cause for suspicion that he would endanger himself or others with the weapon, and may not have a criminal record with a conviction for a violent crime or of several convictions for nonviolent crimes The license is issued by the canton of residence of the applicant but is valid throughout Switzerland. The license is valid for six months, maximally nine months. It is usually valid for the acquisition of one weapon only.

The acquisition license is required only if a weapon is acquired from a dealer. No license is required for transactions between private individuals. Instead, these are permitted as long as the seller verifies the identity and age of the buyer by checking an official identification document and as long as he has no reason to believe that the buyer has been or should be disqualified from gun ownership. The buyer may ascertain these circumstances by requesting information from the cantonal authorities, but only if the buyer consents in writing.

Carrying of Guns

The carrying of a gun for defensive purposes requires a carrying license, which will be granted only if the applicant is qualified to acquire guns; demonstrates a need for the weapon to protect himself, others, or property against existing dangers; and has passed an exam to test his required theoretical knowledge and practical skill. The theoretical exam tests knowledge of

criminal provisions on violent crimes and self-defense, and necessity as a justification or excuse;
federal and cantonal weapons law provisions;
types of weapons and ammunition; and
security measures and proper conduct when carrying weapons.

The practical examination tests the applicant’s skill in handling the weapon, including loading, unloading, operating the safety device, and shooting.

A carrying license permits the concealed carrying of a handgun. No carrying license is required for the transporting of an unloaded weapon for legitimate purposes, such as travel to and from the shooting range or hunting environment, as long as the ammunition is kept separate from the weapon.

So whats your thoughts on Swiss Gun Laws?

Who Dares Wins

Replies

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,649 Senior Member
    If something is a right, it doesn't require testing, licensing, permitting, or registration.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • Warmaster94Warmaster94 New Member Posts: 20 New Member
    If something is a right, it doesn't require testing, licensing, permitting, or registration.

    Well put
    Who Dares Wins
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Overview

    The Weapons Act contains a comprehensive regime for the licensing of the acquisition and carrying of permitted weapons; the banning of certain weapons, including automatic firearms; and the production and trade in weapons, including the reporting obligations of dealers and a registration system that covers all privately owned guns, including those acquired by inheritance, but not including hunting rifles. The federal Weapons Act is implemented by the cantons and the cantons also keep registers of privately owned guns. The provisions on ammunition are in keeping with the principles of the Act, which aims to deter abuse while permitting lawful gunownership.

    The one point about this law that most Americans won't go for are the words Licensing and permitting. You don't get the beauty of the U.S. Constitution yet. Not your fault, it's just the way you've been programmed to think. That is listed in our constitution and no law is needed. It's a God Given Right.

    A simple law or statute, as is this Swiss law, is easily gotten around. All the politicians need do is vote to remove the law. But when it's a basic part of your constitution it's harder to remove if not impossible.

    Unfortunately, it's not impossible. It may be virtually impossible to do away with, as ours is, but with a liberal SCOTUS (Supreme Court) its interpretation can be altered, rendering it less effective. That's the big hoopla of why we don't want Hillary elected president. She gets to choose the court justices replacements and we are at a tie with 4 liberals and 4 conservatives right now since Justice Scalia died and she will no doubt pick some libtard anti constitutional left leaning commies who will re-interpret the 2nd Amendment. If a liberal Justice is picked and confirmed that will shift the court from what it was before Scalia's death, being conservative, to a liberal majority. Congress being predominately Republican right now has refused to confirm Obama's pick. So it will go to the next president to pick Scalia's replacement. Scalia was conservative and one of the all time great Supreme Court Justices.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,807 Senior Member
    Switzerland is a small country that controls immigration rather well, and is populated by very civilized people, who are smart enough to know that voluntarily following its laws benefits everyone. So, a strong, relatively 'lenient' central government may work for them, if the citizens are willing to consent to it.

    However, their laws would be much too strict for a rural resident of the US, because it would prevent some law-abiding people from being able to control their environment against those would threaten it.

    Also, our founding fathers knew that freedom would spawn a certain amount of corruption in government, once it was allowed to become too large, and left the door open for citizens to remove the government, by force if necessary, and begin again, if necessary. Many of us believe that it is important for that government to be a little worried about just such a public intervention, and our 2nd Amendment rights reserve that right for the citizens.

    Hence, the perpetual political battle between corrupt politicians and patriotic citizens, over gun laws.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    No.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • shushshush Senior Member Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    No.

    Toblerone-chocolate-522042_800_418.jpg

    What of chocolate?
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Never had one a them.
    I do like the cheese though. :tooth:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,934 Senior Member
    No, but they're pretty well for European standards.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    shush wrote: »
    Toblerone-chocolate-522042_800_418.jpg

    What of chocolate?

    I've been to Switzerland. Loved the different chocolates and sent some back to my Mom in the states while I was visiting Switzerland on leave. Got to see some of the locals at a village I was visiting shooting on a Sunday after church services. Them folks could shoot! The gals were right pretty, too! :love:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,909 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Vermont USA is better. You want a gun? You walk into a store and buy one, any kind except for full auto, that needs registration with the ATF but that is very doable too.

    Want to carry a gun? Go ahead, concealed or open, no license, makes NO difference...
    Wyoming is the same....
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    shush wrote: »
    Toblerone-chocolate-522042_800_418.jpg

    What of chocolate?

    The Swiss are masters of chocolate for sure, but I am not a fan of Toblerone. I don't like the little hard sticky pieces of nougat. They stick in my teeth and don't add to good mouth feel or flavor. Actually, my favorite all time chocolate bar happens to be British. Cadbury Milk Chocolate is my all time favorite chocolate bar. It beats Hershey's AND Toblerone hands down.

    But don't get me wrong about the Swiss gun laws. I'd much rather see them have a law like this than being anti gun like most of Europe and the rest of the world.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Warmaster94Warmaster94 New Member Posts: 20 New Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Actually, my favorite all time chocolate bar happens to be British. Cadbury Milk Chocolate is my all time favorite chocolate bar. It beats Hershey's AND Toblerone hands down.

    .

    I'd have to say that Toblerone is my favourite since im not a big fan of cadbury.
    Who Dares Wins
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Elk creek wrote: »
    Wyoming is the same....


    Same for Idaho.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Driving a car is a privilege, and subject to regulation. Armed self-defense is a right, as is being able to decide what one's government can and cannot do. Without the ability to bear and use arms, "Those who choose to beat their swords into plowshares will plow for those who didn't!" Giving any government the ability to ban or regulate arms is the first step down a slippery slope to subjugation by a corrupt government obsessed with wielding unlimited power. Every genocide in recorded history began with disarming the future victims.
    Jerry
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    I'd have to say that Toblerone is my favourite since im not a big fan of cadbury.

    Wow! We have totally different tastes. Or maybe familiarity breeds contempt! Since you're British and Cadbury is Brit. Maybe you've just been around Cadbury and you're just used to it or whatever. I love Cadbury, it's so rich and wonderful. I love it so much. Toblerone sucks for me.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shushshush Senior Member Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    ............... Since you're British and Cadbury is Brit.

    Bad news snake;

    "Cadbury is a British multinational confectionery company wholly owned by American company Mondelez International (originally Kraft Foods) since 2010."

    "The many ways Cadbury is losing its magic."

    Harry Wallop, March 2016.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/features/the-many-ways-cadbury-is-losing-its-magic/

    Sad times indeed.

    "8. Ditching the Bournville chocolate from the Heroes tub
    Back in 2013, the parent company altered what went into a tub of Heroes, a selection box that highlights its key chocolate bars.
    It ditched Bournville – not only one of its oldest brands, but one that pays homage to the great Birmingham home of Cadbury – in favour of Toblerone, one of the Mondelez brands.
    And Swiss, to boot.
    At the time Angus Kennedy, editor of Kennedy’s Confection magazine,told the Daily Mail: "To replace Bourneville with Toblerone is unpatriotic. It’s like replacing the fish in fish and chips with mussels."
    A spokesman for Mondelez insisted Toblerone was only a "guest" during Christmas.
    But the Bournville bar is still missing."

    The counter-jumpers!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 24,469 Senior Member
    In that case, turn about is fair play. What goes around, comes around. Its not as bad (yet, anyway) as what Cadbury did to Peter-Paul back in the early 80s.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    What goes around comes around. Since InBev in Brazil bought Anheizer-Busch, the Budweiser Clydesdales just might get replaced by Llamas!
    Jerry
  • shushshush Senior Member Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    Cadbury did to Peter-Paul back in the early 80s.

    I'll see you and raise you Knight's Knifty Knibbles.
  • horselipshorselips Senior Member Posts: 3,628 Senior Member
    I do not like Switzerland's gun laws. Admittedly they're better than most others in Europe, but they're a long way from the Constitutional Carry, Stand Your Ground, and Castle Doctrine rights I enjoy in Arizona, and I enjoy them without paying any fees, or being licensed, permitted, tested, examined or whatever.

    It's a waste of time and scarce resources trying to keep a bazillion guns away from the few bad people who are bound and determined to acquire them by hook or by crook, it's cheaper and more effective to lock up those bad people and throw away the key.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    shush wrote: »
    Bad news snake;

    "Cadbury is a British multinational confectionery company wholly owned by American company Mondelez International (originally Kraft Foods) since 2010."

    "The many ways Cadbury is losing its magic."

    Harry Wallop, March 2016.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/features/the-many-ways-cadbury-is-losing-its-magic/

    Sad times indeed.

    "8. Ditching the Bournville chocolate from the Heroes tub
    Back in 2013, the parent company altered what went into a tub of Heroes, a selection box that highlights its key chocolate bars.
    It ditched Bournville – not only one of its oldest brands, but one that pays homage to the great Birmingham home of Cadbury – in favour of Toblerone, one of the Mondelez brands.
    And Swiss, to boot.
    At the time Angus Kennedy, editor of Kennedy’s Confection magazine,told the Daily Mail: "To replace Bourneville with Toblerone is unpatriotic. It’s like replacing the fish in fish and chips with mussels."
    A spokesman for Mondelez insisted Toblerone was only a "guest" during Christmas.
    But the Bournville bar is still missing."

    The counter-jumpers!

    That all may be true SHUSH, but I don't care who owns it. I care about the finished product. It's made in the UK by guys and gals that talk funny like you, so for my liking it's Brit! And, in my opinion, there is nothing chocolate made on this side of the pond that can get in the door with it.

    All your examples appear to be major business decisions. All big companies do this. They've got stock holders to keep happy and if they're lagging in projected profits, guess what? Some changes will be made. It happens every day in every business.

    Now sometimes it back fires on em, such as Winchester's 1964 product line changes. That proved to be not too swift a decision. They went a little too far. However, they needed to do something because some of those old firearms were no longer profitable to make as they were. My problem is they could have maintained a little more quality when they made the changes. But anyway, most times big business will hit a home run with changes. I'm not sure about Cadbury's full line, but I do know the old Cadbury bars are still heavenly good.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement