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Beretta 92a1 question.......

ChuckXXChuckXX BannedPosts: 103 Member
Does anyone out there own a Berretta A192??? If so can you tell me how you like it??? Pros and Cons??? I read a couple of reviews that said the standard trigger pull was kinda heavy and the reviewers did not like that. I looked at one yesterday and really liked the looks and feel of it, but never having owned one thought I would get your opinions of the Good and Bad of owning one. I enjoy 9mm's as you guys know and also always appreciate all of your advice and wisdom. THANK YOU to all. The one I looked at yesterday was a standard 92A1 and I made the comment that I was going to keep it in my glovebox of my vehichle and the guy said that for another $250 he could have it sent away and have a corrosion package put on it. Would that be worth it as well???
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Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I hope that $250.00 upcharge includes a big jar of Vaseline! What he's about to do to you will hurt without it! You didn't mention the asking price, but it looks like you needd to do a little more shopping. There's nothing wrong with the basic model 92 as a SD arm, but your dealer sounds a little greedy to me.
    Jerry
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    I have several and I am quite pleased with them. I like the corrosion package for $250.00, just a waste of money.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • TSchubTSchub Senior Member Posts: 783 Senior Member
    If you're looking for a truck/glove box gun, I'd save a bunch of cash and go with a Glock 19, or it's equivalent from another company, if you don't like Glocks. You won't need any corrosion kit for it, and they tend to be good shooters right out of the box.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    I hope that $250.00 upcharge includes a big jar of Vaseline!

    Might have to mix in some slick 50 with that Vaseline.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    TSchub wrote: »
    You won't need any corrosion kit for it, and they tend to be good shooters right out of the box.

    Please explain corrosion kit?
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,385 Senior Member
    The armorer's joke is that while the Americans can design a pistol with about 60 parts, and the Austrians can design a pistol with about 35 parts, the Italians show everybody up by designing a pistol with 6,125,968 parts. This has always been my main grievance with the 92 series (too much tiny, spring-loaded crap that tries to make a bid for freedom at the detail-strip level), but I have others:

    1. The grip is HUGE. I'm 6'3" with hands to match. . .and the grip is still HUGE.

    2. The safety is in the wrong place. Going along with the huge grip, getting the gun running in a hurry can be a challenge for some.

    3. The safety operates in the wrong direction. While your initial reaction might be that I'm just a 1911 junkie set in his ways - and you'd be right - but consider how easy it is to inadvertently engage the safety during a reload of the weapon. If you train to rack the slide to chamber your first round, there's a good chance you'll decock the gun in the process. While you're better off using the slide stop with this gun, see complaint #1 above.

    4. There is no lockup at the muzzle end of the barrel as seen on Browning-based, tilting barrel designs - all of the lockup on a Beretta is done at the breech end. Perhaps not a big issue for combat accuracy, these guns do not have the potential for tack-driving that the Browning-system guns do.

    5. Open slide = crap access port.

    6. And on top of all of that, it's DA/SA = two different trigger pulls to figure out while somebody is trying to kill you.

    Like all gun nuts, I have my opinions, but I try to keep an open mind. Can't do it with this gun - it's the one I can't find a single scrap of silver lining on. Yes, I'd take one over a Hi Point or a Jennings, but it would be my absolute last choice for anything in the price range of what are considered "quality" guns. I consider even the Taurus clone to be superior - at least its safety is in the proper place.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    Hi, its me again. Mike at the Bullet Hole in Omaha said they would send it away to some company that puts a corrosion package on it for the $250.00. The gun itself was listed at $629.95. BUFORD; How is the standard "trigger pull" on yours. Did you do any changes to yours???
  • TSchubTSchub Senior Member Posts: 783 Senior Member
    Buford,
    The corrosion package that the LGS was trying to sell in the original Post. I don't know what that would be, other than a rip off.
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    Bigslug hits on a number of things, but it seems the opinions regarding the Beretta boil down to two main areas -

    1. Ergonomics. As stated, the grip is very big - especially compared to a Glock 17, which holds 2 more rounds in the mag and is overall much slimmer through the grip. Other issues (the DA/SA trigger pull, the location and operation of the safety, control layout, etc.) are gripes that some folks have with ANY "WonderNine" pistol.

    2. It ain't a 1911. This goes back to the mid-late 80's and the trials and adoption of the Beretta as the replacement for the Gov't Model 1911. There were a lot of very good pistols fielded during the trials - some, like the Ruger P85, were still going through a teething stage and working out some of the bugs, others, like the SiG (the other main finalist in the trial stage) were fully capable of meeting the requirements laid down by the testers. At the end, price and politics played the biggest part of the 92's adoption - more pistols could be bought for the dollar than with SiG, and Beretta was up and running with stateside factories to meet that end of the contract (U.S. built/assembled) where none of the other finalists were.
  • TSchubTSchub Senior Member Posts: 783 Senior Member
    Chuck,
    Pass on that deal. IMHO.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    I have the Brigadier and a 92FS. I like the guns and have done nothing to them. The 92, my children have shot it like a 22 and it's still running strong. Not everyone likes the size or the trigger, I have no problems with either. What you need to do is fire one and see how you like it. I have nothing bad to say about them. My favorite 9mm is my Sig P-228

    Brigadier.
    100_1953-1.jpg
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    To sum up all the points that Bigslug mentioned.............BOAT........ANCHOR.

    It would have to be a very small boat. A serious boat anchor would be a S&W 500.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    BUFORD; Are those the "standard" grips that came on your BRIGADIER???? They are very cool looking and certainly look like they would be comfortable.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    ChuckXX wrote: »
    BUFORD; Are those the "standard" grips that came on your BRIGADIER???? They are very cool looking and certainly look like they would be comfortable.

    Yes, they came on the gun and I like them. The finger grooves help enhance it's boat anchor qualities.
    I recommend you find someone or a gun range where you can rent one and fire it.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    BUFORD; One last dumb question from me. Is that "particular model" still available for purchase??? I couldn't find it on their (Beretta) homepage website. Where could I find one for sale in your opinion??? THANK YOU. ChuckXX
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,385 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    To sum up all the points that Bigslug mentioned.............BOAT........ANCHOR.

    :spittingcoffee: You and I should form our own publishing company - I'll handle the novel, & you can do the Cliff's Notes.

    As for "corrosion resistance", the black Berettas already have their proprietary "Bruniton" finish on them and are chromed inside the barrels. Unless you are talking about the glove box of your submarine, the stock finish should be adequate.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    Strange I don't see it on their website. The main difference was the heavier slide and grip, notice the rise on the top of the slide in the middle. This was to help reduce recoil least ways that's what I was told. I just liked it and bought it. I'll look more later but you can check out these places.

    http://www.gunsamerica.com/

    http://www.gunbroker.com/
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,810 Senior Member
    ChuckXX:
    You like the Beretta 92 get it, learn how to clean it, get a bottle of breakfree, and forget the corrosion package. It won't help in internal corresion prevention, breakfree will.

    Personally, I'd look at CZ's
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    Buford wrote: »
    Strange I don't see it on their website. The main difference was the heavier slide and grip, notice the rise on the top of the slide in the middle. This was to help reduce recoil least ways that's what I was told.

    As I recall, the Brigadier was beefed up at the locking lugs to address the slide cracking and fractures that occurred with some standard 92's (military service). Marketed specifically for trainers and those who would be firing their Berettas far more than the average soldier.
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    Dear NN; You think alot like myself. I already own 3 CZ's. I love them all dearly. I own a CZ Shadow, CZ75-B and a CZ75P-01 Compact. I put night sights on all 3 of them. On my CZ75-B I installed the "thin Blue Aluminum grips" from Robert at the CZ Custom shop in Arizona. Also on that one I got it in "high Polish". Got a Kramer inside the waste band holster too. But I still like the Beretta's too. I just have never owned one and thought I would ask you guys about the Pro's and Con's of owning one. But you can't go too far wrong with CZ's.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    SS3 posted a supplier that had Police trade in guns at a really great price.

    Interesting description by a gun shop commando:

    "The M9 features an open slide design that virtually eliminated jamming, a safety system that combines de-cocking with a positive thumb safety, and a combat muzzle crown. Also featuring Bruniton non-glare black finish."
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    As I recall, the Brigadier was beefed up at the locking lugs to address the slide cracking and fractures that occurred with some standard 92's (military service). Marketed specifically for trainers and those who would be firing their Berettas far more than the average soldier.

    No, I believe it is the FS that is the slide improvement
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    The FS utilized a larger "hammer pin head" to prevent the slide from flying back in case of failure, so that improvement I'll agree with. The Brigadiers used extra metal around the locking lugs, on either side of the slide, to prevent the cracking in that location in the first place.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,713 Senior Member
    Learn something new all the time.

    Thanks.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • TugarTugar Senior Member Posts: 2,262 Senior Member
    I would be leery of spending $600 on a pistol to remain in the glovebox. Buy something you won't cry over if it gets messed up or stolen.
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.
    Winston Churchill
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    BIGSLUG; Could you please elaborate a little more on your #4 and #5 ????? Please. I really like the looks of the gun and especially the 17 round capacity. But I just don't want to buy one and find that Iam sorry. I have only done that about 295 times in my life (ha-ha) and always get "hosed" when I go to trade it back in. Oh, you shot it 50 times and don't like it???? No problem we'll give you half of what you paid for it a week ago!!!! Also BUFORD if you read this I would like to hear your "input " too since you own a very beautiful one. THANK YOU. You guys are truly great.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,385 Senior Member
    #4. The best example of this is the 1911 with its separate barrel bushing. On match-grade systems, the bushing dovetails so tightly into the slide that you need a wrench for disassembly. The barrel fits within the bushing with similar tightness. The net effect of this is that when the weapon is in battery, the muzzle of the barrel is locked into CONSISTENT alignment with the sights. Combat-tolerance guns are going to be looser, but there is still contact between the end of the barrel and the slide. Newer designs based on the 1911's tilting barrel system (Glock, Sig, S&W, CZ, HK, Ruger, etc...) typically eliminate the separate barrel bushing, but still accomplish the same muzzle-to-slide friction fit. Since the muzzle is your last point of control over where the bullet travels, and the front sight is your primary aiming device, lockup in this area is key to maintaining accuracy. The Walther P38 (which heavily inspired the mechanism of the 92) dealt with this simply by placing the front sight directly on the barrel. Not sure why Beretta didn't follow suit.

    The muzzle of the Beretta's barrel is hanging loose in the slide, with all of the lockup being done at the rear, equaling more opportunity for slop to creep into the equation.

    #5. Look for the barrel of a 1911 or 1911-derived pistol. You can see the muzzle of the barrel, and you can see the chamber. You can't see anything else because the slide totally encloses it. There really aren't a lot of places that debris can get into one of these guns in sufficient quantity to make them quit. Look at the slide of a Beretta and you can see the entire top third of the barrel along its entire length with a long gap on either side that can allow entry of sand, mud, water, what have you.

    For whatever reason, Beretta adamantly refuses to adopt the Browning system, using the P38 approach on most of their guns, and a rotating barrel system on the Cougars. Stubborn pride, I suppose. :uhm:
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    BIGSLUG; A BIG "THANK YOU" TO YOU. YOU ARE THE MAN. Iam about 90% sure now that I WILL NOT buy one. I was really close to pulling the trigger (no pun intended) and buying one. But I will look else where at this point. Maybe I will investigate the Walther P38 mentioned in your post. I just liked the "looks" of the Berretta 92A1, but a guy can't judge a book by its cover. THANK YOU AGAIN. By the way, I love my 3 CZ's and I love dearly my Sig Sauer P226 Platnum Elite. Was just looking for something a "little different" this time around.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,385 Senior Member
    As for the LOOKS of the Beretta 92. . .what color is your parachute?
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • joseph06joseph06 Member Posts: 133 Member
    Chuck, if you're looking for a glove box gun in Omaha, I would definitely lean towards something than can be run dry, or nearly dry. Cold weather and lubricant don't always go together well. I'm a Glock fan, but any of the polymer framed guns should be good in that regard.
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