Shot or diseased spike

Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior MemberPosts: 1,553 Senior Member
So this guy's been on three of my camera's all week. Can't tell if he's been shot or diseased. I'm leaning towards shot?

Thoughts

Shot%20dseer.jpg

deer.jpg
Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

John 3: 1-21

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I think you need someone like woodsrunner to examine the photo. The injured elk Ive seen had yellow excretions on old leg wound. Id be inclined to think a deer might have the same unless its a very old wound or genetic defect.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,727 Senior Member
    Maybe fighting with another deer? Barb wire? Vehicle hit/ road rash?
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    Maybe fighting with another deer? Barb wire? Vehicle hit/ road rash?

    Good point! I'll be working from the ranch all week and he's on my shoot list for sure!
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,158 Senior Member
    No way to tell if the animal is putting weight on it, or using it for support? Actually the Wound appears to be healing nicely. Body condition looks good so he is able to get around eat & drink.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,904 Senior Member
    I'd say hit by a vehicle
    that left rear leg looks funny, like it has been broken and not being used much; mostly dangling.

    Cull it if you can.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    I'd tend to agree with Chiro, that it makes me think him and one of his "buddies" were sparring and he got gored. He zigged when he should have zagged
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • NCFUBARNCFUBAR Senior Member Posts: 4,324 Senior Member
    Bullet wound probably would have been more destructive to the shoulder/chest area. The second photo seems to show the wound like 41mag said is healing. I am thinking something put a nice whole in the first couple layers of skin but nature is actually helping the little spike heal. As to cull ... if he is hobbling around because the shoulder is compromised cull. If you have better breeding buck stock I'd still take him. If it is merely a flesh wound and he is healing it shows good stock there.
    “The further a society drifts from truth ... the more it will hate those who speak it."
    - George Orwell
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Looks relatively healthy. But, he is not putting weight on the left front leg in either picture. Don't know if that is due to injury or just the luck of the draw in that both pics were in mid stride with the left leg.

    Wound appears to be healing. Though internally is difficult to tell.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    While I think it's a battle scar, don't construe that to me saying give him a pass.

    I normally cull ANY injured deer I see
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,702 Senior Member
    Almost looks like a Cutaneous Fibroma.........

    Have a look here...........http://www.outdoorhub.com/how-to/2014/11/04/recognize-5-common-lethal-deer-diseases/
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,269 Senior Member
    One rainy morning I took a snap shot at a running doe with a .35 Remington and thought I saw hair fly. After a lot of time attempting to track it, I figured I'd really missed. The next summer, my son saw a doe with twin fawns- - - -and about a 6" diameter healed-over bald spot on her left ham. I think I probably did a little surface damage that healed up without any permanent effects other than a scar.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,486 Senior Member
    I can't tell. Have you seen the deer with your own eyes, or just on the trail cam. That would go a long ways toward helping me determine if it needs to be taken down or left alone.

    I shot a deer one time whose right shoulder had been injured, probably from being shot. The entire shoulder was useless and atrophied to the point the meat on it was not edible. The rest of it was ok, though.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    I can't tell. Have you seen the deer with your own eyes, or just on the trail cam. That would go a long ways toward helping me determine if it needs to be taken down or left alone.

    I shot a deer one time whose right shoulder had been injured, probably from being shot. The entire shoulder was useless and atrophied to the point the meat on it was not edible. The rest of it was ok, though.

    I have not seen him except on camera. Was out last night on one of his hang outs and saw the tall 6 point with brow tines come in to the feeder. He's really tall but an inch or so from being legal width wise or I would remove him from the gene pool as well. This is where I wish I had a good camera with telephoto lens. I had the 6pt, with 16 quail and two rabbits under the feeder at one time. I think it would have made a pretty cool picture!

    I'll be out all week and hopefully take him out out, if I do I'll post pics of the wound so we have a better idea what happened to him.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • Great OutdoorsGreat Outdoors Member Posts: 218 Member
    what do you have in your feeder? I don't see any corn. I am looking for a good protein pellet for my feeders
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    what do you have in your feeder? I don't see any corn. I am looking for a good protein pellet for my feeders

    I usually run 4.5 bags of corn and a bag and half of antler max protein mixed in the feeders. Seems to work well. My cows may helped themselves prior to the spike showing up!

    I also have two gravity fed protein feeders running from Aug until end the Jan or when the protein runs out.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • SargeSarge Member Posts: 324 Member
    Iunno man, it's hard to tell from the pics. Looks to me he's favoring that leg, but it could be luck of the draw that the camera happen to catch the pic when he was mid-stride.
    Pain is okay. Puking is okay. Fear is okay. Falling is okay. Crawling is okay. Failure is okay. Quitting is not.
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    Sarge wrote: »
    Iunno man, it's hard to tell from the pics. Looks to me he's favoring that leg, but it could be luck of the draw that the camera happen to catch the pic when he was mid-stride.

    Look at my other post about culling the spike. I took him out this evening. He was hit by a car and busted up pretty good.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
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