Winchester Mod. 94

pbearperrypbearperry MemberPosts: 91 Member
Has anyone had any luck smoothing out a Mod. 94 action.I have one in 44mag that cycles really stiff. Thanx

Replies

  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,802 Senior Member
    I agree with wambli on this. I have a 94 Angle Eject in 30-30 made in the early 80s that is just starting to get smoothed out. I think the Marlins are naturally smoother, but I like 94s because of their sleek lines and easy handling. It's a draw with me. I have a 94 but some day I'll have a Marlin as well. They are both a legend and great rifles and every serious shooter-collector should have at least one of each.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • calebibcalebib Senior Member Posts: 1,701 Senior Member
    Just pack the action with lapping compound and work the action a couple hundred times.















    Just kidding, don't do that. :yesno:
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,542 Senior Member
    I own a few 94's and my wrangler big ring in .44mag has had thousands of rounds run through it in the twenty or so years that I've owned it and is butter smooth. I just knocked the dust off of my 94 in .375win as I'd been wanting to roll a few deer with it and I noticed the action is stiff as heck considering that it probably doesn't have 50 rounds run through it. Aside from oiling the heck out of the action and working it for a while as I watch something on TV, I'll be running a few rounds through it this Friday and I'll be carrying it this weekend. By the end of the deer season I expect the action to be much smoother.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • pbearperrypbearperry Member Posts: 91 Member
    OK thanks for the responses.Looks like I am going to have to Lucas McCain the rifle a few hundred times.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,327 Senior Member
    Can't recall hearing about a stiff action in a 94; the only .44 Magnum I've fired was as smooth as my dad's 30-30 (Early '60s) and an old (Probably made in the '40s) 94 I bought for a friend. Calebib's suggestion seems like a good one, but I'd first check if there's some other reason, like lack of grease in the spots that need it, or some part assembled wrong.
    If my memory doesn't fail me, there might be a screw somewhere that if overtightened just a little, it can make the action to cycle pretty rough (Or was this in the '92?).
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,258 Senior Member
    If you're comfortable doing a pretty detailed teardown, try the fit of each moving part and hone any tight spots with a very fine-grit slipstone and plenty of oil. Any mass-produced product has manufacturing tolerances, and sometimes mating parts can be on opposite ends of the tolerance scale, resulting in a tight fit. Just be careful not to overdo any polishing work. DO NOT USE A DREMEL TOOL! Unless you're very skilled at power-polishing gun parts, you can turn a nice gun into a piece of junk in just a few minutes!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,663 Senior Member
    Go buu a pile of ammo, and shoot it. Best way in the world to make it run slicker, and also get you familiar with the gun so it works as second nature.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,952 Senior Member
    Here's a great article about smoothing out a Marlin. I'm sure the Winchester is different, but many of the same principles apply I'm sure.

    http://marauder.homestead.com/files/tuning_m_1894.htm

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • 30-30shooter30-30shooter Member Posts: 224 Member
    it usually smooths out over time and use.
    A woman who demands further gun control legislation is like a chicken who roots for Colonel Sanders.-Larry Elder I have a very strict gun control policy: if there's a gun around, I want to be in control of it.-Clint Eastwood
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    it usually smooths out over time and use.

    This one is extremely smooth. It was made in 1919 and has been cycled a lot! Ya gotta love that walnut. :wink:


    IMG_1386.jpg


    IMG_1388.jpg
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    shooter,

    If that ol' Winchester is yours, you suck worse than Hoover, Dyson, and Bissell combined. That thing is gorgeous.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    shooter wrote: »
    This one is extremely smooth. It was made in 1919 and has been cycled a lot! Ya gotta love that walnut. :wink:


    IMG_1386.jpg

    A true work of art, it should be married to a brace of SA revolvers !!!!
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,225 Senior Member
    shooter...that ain't even right, and I mean that in the nicest way possible. Beautiful piece.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    Thanks for all the kind words regarding my model 94. I've never, ever, seen this kind of wood on a 94 Winchester! It's got some battle scars, but they give it character and I don't want to risk re-finishing it. The only other gun in my collection that has this quality of wood is a Remington model 3200, 1 of 1000 skeet gun (12 ga.) that set me back $1,000 in the early eighties.
    Here are some better shots of the stock; sunlight makes it look 3 dimensional.

    IMG_1391.jpg

    IMG_1385.jpg

    IMG_1395.jpg

    I don't want to hijack this thread, but can anybody blame me for not wanting to re-finish it?
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    Re-finish?!? Don't TOUCH that baby. Sure, they're working on restoring "The Last Supper", but that's because it's lost its beauty over the years due to pollution. Restore this one, even if it's a great job, and you lose that "original" factor any collector is going to be looking at.

    **edit to add** Don't want to come off as bombastic, and re-reading your post, I see you DON'T want to re-finish. Good man. **

    Let the original work stand on its own. Some of those old Winchesters were built as special-order to a customer's specifications, and this one (half-magazine, full crescent rifle buttplate, upgraded wood, tang sight, and is that a case-hardened receiver?) looks every bit a custom-order. BTW - is there a dovetail cut or any other provision for a rear sight in the usual place on the barrel? If not, then that's DEFINITELY factory-custom.

    Ever get a provenance letter from Winchester on it? (Who ordered and accepted delivery of the rifle?) That would go further in keeping the gun's value high.
  • centermass556centermass556 Senior Member Posts: 3,508 Senior Member
    I second, third, fourth...whatever everyonce else said...My model 94 in 357 took a little while before it was not as stiff.
    "To have really lived, you must have almost died. To those who have fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,802 Senior Member
    I second, third, fourth...whatever everyonce else said...My model 94 in 357 took a little while before it was not as stiff.

    I agree. In as good of shape as this one looks, don't touch it. The natural patina of the metal and the aged look of the wood finish add to it's asthetics. However, if it were badly corroded and the stock was a mess and the finish was less than 70% I would say it would be a good candidate for a restoration. But when I say restoration, I don't mean by your Local Gun Smith. I mean by a registered and certified Winchester dealer. If a certified dealer does the work it is considered original. But still, I would NOT touch an old firearm unless it was damaged so that the damage was detracting from its value. And when I speak of damage, I'm talking about damage from rust, moisture, hard use, etc. Not just a broken stock or missing half the lever.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,802 Senior Member
    This also goes for rebluing or refinishing a stock. If a certified factory dealer does the work, it shouldn't lose any value and may gain value, especially if it looked bad in the first place and the factory certified work improves its looks.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,551 Senior Member
    My Marlin in .44 Magnum is still a little stiff, and I bought it second-hand in the mid- '70's, because I've never used it very much.
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