Al Herminoe plank on bulkhead

philo426philo426 MemberPosts: 360 Member
Next wooden ship project

Replies

  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    1486738937135_zpsy4ydyzdm.jpg
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,631 Senior Member
    Wow, you have my admiration for your talent, skill and patience on building these models.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 17,959 Senior Member
    Gorgeous! What skill indeed.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Thanks guys! It is coming along.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 17,959 Senior Member
    Still want to know how you got the rib build-up in your first picture to stick to the ceiling! :tooth:
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Lol!I do not know why it appears upside down!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 24,187 Senior Member
    Good work there! Plank on frame is HARD to do. Good deal of skill involved in that. Can't wait to see the finished ship! :up:
    I may be a Deplorable, but at least I'm not a Liberal!!!



  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Want me to send you some Live Oak for frames and ribs? :jester:

    Many years ago when Mystic Seaport Museum rebuilt the whale ship "Charles W. Morgan" I supplied the Virgin Longleaf Pine Timber for side planking (Came from over on Eglin, AFB where Ned got dosed with Agent Orange :yikes:). Mystic also wanted a Live Oak timber--forget the dimensions--but I couldn't find one with the correct diameter and length to saw it out. Good friend of mine did find a Live Oak big enough, diameter and length wise growing close by, to saw the King Post out of.
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Oak is some tough wood, that is why they called The U.S.S. Constitution Old Ironsides.Its white oak sides were stronger than the English variety.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I just finished "South," Sir Ernest Shackleton and the Endurance. Apparently them wood hull ships took the ice alot better than the steel hulls of that time. Guess you're the builder and carpenter now. :up:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Cool.have to check out that book.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Old Ironsides was planked with Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) cut in the far western Panhandle of Florida close to where Fisheadgib is. This is an extremely tough and dense "diffused porous" hardwood that does not have annual growth rings. Rather, the annual growth is all inter-twined and interlocking, weaving back and forth creating a bond of the cells that even an axe or wedges can't split and separate. It was impossible for the deck guns of the period to penetrate it or even split it.

    White Oak, (Quercus alba) is a ring porous hardwood that, during the growing season, will lay down springwood cells and summerwood cells side by side. This wood can be easily split with an axe or by cannons, but it does have an important part to play in building wooden ships and boats. The wood can be steam bent very easily, and will hold its shape after being steam bent. Its extremely strong, and was used extensively for ships ribs and bent frames. England and Western Europe does have oak species, but none are as tough as Live Oak, so we had a strategic advantage England didn't have during the RevWar Period!

    The Whale Ship at Mystic Seaport Museum had been ribbed and planked with timber cut in the present day Tifton, Georgia area in the late 1839ish period. The Museum wanted to use rebuilding materials from as close to the original sources as possible, and that's how I got involved.....due to my involvement with re-establishing Native Longleaf Forests in the South Georgia/north Florida area. It was a fun job!
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Planked up the lower hull today.I ran out of the 15 basswood strips I bought yesterday so i used some left over mahogany.That is ok because i plan to either paint the hull white or copper it. 1486853144832_zpsncxa7wnm.jpg
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Should plow through rough seas with a minimum of hogging :popcorn:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Yes it should!
  • sherwoodsherwood Senior Member Posts: 1,214 Senior Member
    Did Gibbs help you with this???????????????????
    I may be old but I ain't dead!
    DPRMD
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    I was afraid to ask because if I messed up.he would smack me upside the head like he does Palmer and Mcgeek!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,394 Senior Member
    To add to Woodsrunners post, just east of Pensacola in Gulf Breeze is part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore called the Naval Live Oaks Reservation. It's a stretch of land that was purchased by the Government in 1828 to provide lumber for naval vessels and was the first and only federal tree farm. There is no museum but it's a really nice park that extends from the gulf to the bay and has lots of walking trails and picnic areas. The whole area around Pensacola just oozes history.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    gETTING READY TO PAINT. 1488266264101_zpsmmveerwc.jpg
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,806 Senior Member
    Back when a hurricane toppled a number of Live Oak trees along the SE coast, not to long ago, shipwrights from all over paid a handsome fee for them for wooden planks.

    What is the ship a model of? I wish I had that level of patience.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 28,119 Senior Member
    That is absolutely spectacular. Always wanted one of those for my office but I don't have the tools, workshop, talent or patience so it stays in the bucket list...
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,226 Senior Member
    I want one with guns that actually shoot!
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Thanks guys!funny you should say that about guns that actually shoot, as I saw Some vids on Youtube where they had r/c battleships that shot bbs.The ships had balsa sides and they would sink each other!very cool!
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Cut the upper gun ports and painted the inner bulwarks red. 1491448085790161774746_zps9o8rpsaf.jpg
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    It's looking like it could make it clear around the horn and back.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • philo426philo426 Member Posts: 360 Member
    Yes sir but the horn is very nasty,especially the roaring fourties.
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