the reason for no trust for Trump

VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior MemberPosts: 6,528 Senior Member
And speaking of a Texas state legislator who favors reform, Trump said, "We'll destroy his career." Just another day on America's steep ascending path back to greatness.

http://www.pennlive.com/opinion/2017/02/why_is_trump_siding_with_sheri.html


http://constitution.com/president-trump-wrong-civil-asset-forfeiture/

http://reason.com/blog/2017/02/09/trump-does-not-know-what-civil-forfeitur

Still hoping he gets a clue, not holding breath.
It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.

Replies

  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,726 Senior Member
    Yeah, that guy was just wanting to protect citizens 4th amendment rights, and has his career threatened.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • john9001john9001 Senior Member Posts: 668 Senior Member
    I think asset forfeiture before a conviction is wrong.

    but.

    Who carries tens of thousands of dollars around in their car? I move money through financial intuitions.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,726 Senior Member
    john9001 wrote: »
    Who carries tens of thousands of dollars around in their car? I move money through financial intuitions.

    People who buy and sell cars. Jewelry dealers. People that don't trust banks.

    Hell, I did it once when I got a big check, just because I wanted to see what $10,0000 dollars in cash was like. The points here is no reason to deprive anyone of life, liberty, or PROPERTY without due process of law.

    That's kind of a big deal for America. It was put in the frigging Declaration of Independence
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,101 Senior Member
    It was also put into the Fourth Amendment...
    Overkill is underrated.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,528 Senior Member
    john9001 wrote: »
    I think asset forfeiture before a conviction is wrong.

    but.

    Who carries tens of thousands of dollars around in their car? I move money through financial intuitions.
    Small business people. Buying a grader out of state at a auction used to be a cash deal.

    You dont have to carry it around in your car either. There was at least one case of a grocery store owner who made cash deposits who had his assets seized because he made cash deposits. Not by the IRS, but by PD.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,741 Senior Member
    john9001 wrote: »
    I think asset forfeiture before a conviction is wrong.

    but.

    Who carries tens of thousands of dollars around in their car? I move money through financial intuitions.
    There are good reasons to distrust banks. There have been not so insignificant efforts to force us into becoming a cashless society where banks and the government control and track every transaction that takes place in the country. These seizures and the apologists for them are one of the primary tools attempting to force us in that direction. If you've paid any attention to international news it is not uncommon for countries and banks to freeze deposits or limit withdrawals. If you listen to financial news you'll hear conservative economists calling for negative interest rates and other policies that essentially boil down to stealing your hard earned money. Yes I use banks, but I sure as hell don't trust the bankers, the fed, or the government to have my best financial interests at heart.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • tubabucknuttubabucknut Banned Posts: 3,520 Senior Member
    I was going to post about this a few days ago, but it was only because I hate Trump, and law enforcement. There can be no other reason to have a problem with this.


    john9001 wrote: »
    I move money through financial intuitions.
    And people all have to do things the way you do?

    I will be carrying a large sum of money in the next few weeks, when I go to purchase a van to convert to a handicap vehicle for my daughter. Why should I even have to consider the possibility that it can just be taken away from me because someone in law enforcement unilaterally decides I got it through illegal activities?

    Here in NC a convienence store owner had his entire life's saving confiscated, because he routinely deposited cash in amounts less than $10,000. He was depositing his cash sales for the day. He had amassed a large sum for retirement and they took it all. Fortunately the public backlash lead to it being returned, but why did they take it without investigating first? Because they could is the answer. CAF has got to go. At least in its current form. Prosecution must happen first.
    It's because I hate Trump.
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,719 Senior Member
    Watch the YouTube videos of cops asking "do you have drugs, weapons, or cash in the car?"

    This question is ripe for abuse. Tell the truth and become a road pirate victim. Lie, and risk a felony.

    Cato has examples of cops taking as little as $75 without charging the person with anything.





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,952 Senior Member
    There are good reasons to distrust banks. There have been not so insignificant efforts to force us into becoming a cashless society where banks and the government control and track every transaction that takes place in the country. These seizures and the apologists for them are one of the primary tools attempting to force us in that direction. If you've paid any attention to international news it is not uncommon for countries and banks to freeze deposits or limit withdrawals. If you listen to financial news you'll hear conservative economists calling for negative interest rates and other policies that essentially boil down to stealing your hard earned money. Yes I use banks, but I sure as hell don't trust the bankers, the fed, or the government to have my best financial interests at heart.

    AMEN!!!! I don't blame ANYBODY who doesn't trust banks, or wants to live on a "cash basis"!! Under NO circumstances will I ever approve of grabbing someone's cash and forcing them to prove their innocence.

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,685 Senior Member
    john9001 wrote: »
    I think asset forfeiture before a conviction is wrong.

    but.

    Who carries tens of thousands of dollars around in their car? I move money through financial intuitions.

    I periodically go to livestock and equipment auctions and it's not uncommon at all for a farmer in bib overalls with a sweat stained ball cap on to have fifty grand in their pocket. Money talks.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    I periodically go to livestock and equipment auctions and it's not uncommon at all for a farmer in bib overalls with a sweat stained ball cap on to have fifty grand in their pocket. Money talks.

    :agree: Along with the already mentioned car buyers at auctions, cattle buyers, heavy equipment auctions, and the like.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Im pretty sure people were planting little stashes of gold like corn in the garden after the civil war. Different times but maybe not so much.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    I've been reprimanded at work for not performing a CAF on a vehicle that had several ounces of powder cocaine in it.

    The registration showed two registrants: a 35 year old man (arrested) and a 81 year old woman. The man pleaded with me not to seize the car because his problems will leave his grandmother without the car. He lives with her.

    I had another squad go to the registration address and sure enough. It's the only car at the household. I didn't CAF the car. I had the old woman brought to the scene and take the car home.

    I was reprimanded. Not punitively, but I was read the riot act about how that car could have become the department's and made the agency thousands either by complete forfeiture or owner buy-back.

    I refuted and asked the supervisor if he thought the 81 year old woman could afford to pay thousands of dollars in buy back considering her grandson won't pay--he's a broke drug addict.

    I was told to leave the office.

    This among other things began my decline and what will be my eventual exit from law enforcement.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,726 Senior Member
    Thank you, Jason.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • tubabucknuttubabucknut Banned Posts: 3,520 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    Thank you, Jason.

    I second this.
    It's because I hate Trump.
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,146 Senior Member
    It's inevitable that people or organizations will be greedy if you keep giving them "free money."
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,741 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    I've been reprimanded at work for not performing a CAF on a vehicle that had several ounces of powder cocaine in it.

    The registration showed two registrants: a 35 year old man (arrested) and a 81 year old woman. The man pleaded with me not to seize the car because his problems will leave his grandmother without the car. He lives with her.

    I had another squad go to the registration address and sure enough. It's the only car at the household. I didn't CAF the car. I had the old woman brought to the scene and take the car home.

    I was reprimanded. Not punitively, but I was read the riot act about how that car could have become the department's and made the agency thousands either by complete forfeiture or owner buy-back.

    I refuted and asked the supervisor if he thought the 81 year old woman could afford to pay thousands of dollars in buy back considering her grandson won't pay--he's a broke drug addict.

    I was told to leave the office.

    This among other things began my decline and what will be my eventual exit from law enforcement.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    :usa:

    Unfortunately your story illustrates exactly how institutions fail. Good people are reprimanded for doing the right thing and eventually get tired of it and leave. This leaves the institutions without their moral compass and only the "loyal" employees who blindly follow the existing order remain.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
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