Recoil difference in shotguns

kansashunterkansashunter Senior MemberPosts: 1,512 Senior Member
I am still looking for a shotgun, was looking at O/O but lately have looked at autoloaders. I have found one I like but it is not gas operated and I have read that the recoil is worse with these (inertia) as compared to gas operated. I know stock and recoil pad and other things effect recoil but just how much difference does the type of action make?

Replies

  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,958 Senior Member
    I am still looking for a shotgun, was looking at O/O but lately have looked at autoloaders. I have found one I like but it is not gas operated and I have read that the recoil is worse with these (inertia) as compared to gas operated. I know stock and recoil pad and other things effect recoil but just how much difference does the type of action make?

    I know the old Browning hump Backs do have a bit more recoil but it's bearable. I've always heard that gas guns were lighter on the push than inertia guns. But I don't think any of them is abusive. I think gas guns are slower acting than inertia guns.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
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  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 11,112 Senior Member
    Not enough to worry about, gas feels more like a push in my 1100/1187 and recoil feels more like a snap in my Benelli, heavier sustained fire in my Benelli affects my target shooting more than in my 1100/1187, say like 10-12 rounds in a row.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,231 Senior Member
    Well, I have a Browning humpback Sweet 16, a Remington Model 11 12 ga., and a Remington 878 12 ga. The Browning humpback and Remington Model 11 kick a LOT harder than the gas operated Rem. 878. The recoil operated ones tend to have a lot more thrust towards the back due to the recoiling barrel. And the action of a recoil operated action sits higher than the action of a gas operated shotgun, and that higher action does accentuate recoil.

    In autoloaders, you could do a LOT worse than a Remington 1100 trap model.

    I have an Ithaca 12 ga. O/U shotgun, and it kicks like a blind bridled mule. I HATE it. Took it dove hunting once, ONCE, and my right cheek looked like someone laid a 2x4 up side my haidbone. MARVELOUS multicolored bruise that took some 'splainin' at the nuke plant! :tooth:
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,273 Senior Member
    As stated...gas guns have a softer recoil impulse...while I am not very sensitive to recoil, we can use my wife as a study subject...she finds my Mossberg 500 so abusive, she won't shoot it...the 870 she finds tolerable..she's not wild about the A5.the 1100 she can shoot all day without complaint...all are 12 gauge by the way...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,209 Senior Member
    I am still looking for a shotgun, was looking at O/O but lately have looked at autoloaders. I have found one I like but it is not gas operated and I have read that the recoil is worse with these (inertia) as compared to gas operated. I know stock and recoil pad and other things effect recoil but just how much difference does the type of action make?


    I've had one O/U and one inertia shotgun. I still have the inertia gun--a Stoeger M2000. I also have a Beretta AL-2 gas operated shotgun. I feel no perceivable difference that has any meaningful effect on my follow up shots.

    For that matter, the O/U didn't really either. It had a bit more jab, but it also only had one follow up shot. You made more judicious decisions about using the second one.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    I have a Stogeger M2000, I think it recoils less than my Mossberg 500 even though it is lighter and doesn't have as cushy a pad. The real difference between a pump and auto, for me at least, is that last round. When the bolt locks back and you only hear cha, instead of chachunk from the action.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
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  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 1,498 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I find that with most 2 3/4" shells the difference is not enough to loose sleep over. When you move to 3" shells then you'll know you are shooting inertia vs. gas. But again this is HIGHLY dependent on gun and shooter.

    Concur....3" is when you begin to truly feel recoil. The Franchi Affinity I got last year does pretty well.
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • NCFUBARNCFUBAR Senior Member Posts: 4,324 Senior Member
    This past Spring I went thru a shotgun course with my old Benelli M1S90, going on 30!years old, which is inertia drive. We ran about 500 rounds over the day with over half being slugs or 00 buck. Most others ran pumps so in the morning I had to hear how semiautos we're not going to feed all this and they could do that ... well by day's end I had no problems and my shoulder was fine ... my thumb was the only thing a little sore from loading all the shells. Mine is an old Benelli imported back then by H&K that is 7+1 with a 18.5" barrel and pistol grip stock. At the end of the day the way the inertia drive works the gases out the barrel not back into the chamber my gun was not really dirty and just a wipe down before back in the sleeve (it did get a cleaning back at home). The others in the class were shocked at it even cycling low brass field loads and how clean the chamber and action was at the end. When I said the gun was a late 80's early 90's pre ban that blew their mind. One of the instructors said the Benelli M4 might be a little better shooter being gas but the M1S90 was his favorite.

    To me that little M1S90 is the best shotgun I own overall. Don't get me wrong, I love my old Wingmaster for birds, my Browning for clays (even though I suck at it now) but that Benelli is what I have tucked in the bedroom to greet those uninvited guests. I've messed with the M4 and it is a smoother impulse and probably 15% or so less recoil but it is also a heavier gun and the balance is not the same as my little M1S90 which for me means better handling. I am 5'11" and go 185lbs ... I ain't young and have a touch of arthritis in my shoulder but unless it's a colder day the recoil isn't going to bother me once the shells start flying.
    “The further a society drifts from truth ... the more it will hate those who speak it."
    - George Orwell
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,765 Senior Member
    I've always been told that gas operated are softer recoiling, but have not honestly felt it in my own experience. I have fired more than ten boxes of 'souped up' Rio dove loads through my Stoeger M-2000 over a three day period, and was no worse off than when I was shooting a similar amount through an O/U. I suspect that the stock geometry affects recoil more than the action.
  • kansashunterkansashunter Senior Member Posts: 1,512 Senior Member
    bellcat wrote: »
    Concur....3" is when you begin to truly feel recoil. The Franchi Affinity I got last year does pretty well.

    This is what I have been looking at and I found one at a good price.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,209 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    I've always been told that gas operated are softer recoiling, but have not honestly felt it in my own experience. I have fired more than ten boxes of 'souped up' Rio dove loads through my Stoeger M-2000 over a three day period, and was no worse off than when I was shooting a similar amount through an O/U. I suspect that the stock geometry affects recoil more than the action.

    It's an old wives tale, I believe. If anything a semi auto just lengthens the recoil impulse time a tad which can create a slightly "softer" recoil, but the overall recoil energy is still present.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 2,446 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    It's an old wives tale, I believe. If anything a semi auto just lengthens the recoil impulse time a tad which can create a slightly "softer" recoil, but the overall recoil energy is still present.

    :that:

    It's just a matter of perception. When I was around 8 years old, I would swear I could "feel" the difference between .22 target loads and CCI Mini Mags! I felt very confident with my mini mags when out shooting rabbit. Today, I can only tell them apart by the sound. :roll2:

    Once you get use to the recoil, you won't really feel the difference unless you shoot loads you don't normally shoot. In a single shotgun using the same load, the recoil energy won't change but how you perceive it can change a lot for a whole number of reasons.

    I wouldn't fear the inertial system. It'll just take getting used to. If you don't like the "kick", change your "Hold", "Stance", "Recoil Pad", "Stock" or even your load choice and then shoot it until you get used to it.

    Most importantly, Have Fun!
    Beware of false knowledge -- it is often more dangerous than ignorance.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,000 Senior Member
    I, also, do not think gas or recoil operater, or pump gun makes that big a difference until you start getting above 1&1/2 oz of shot.

    Weight of the gun and a good recoil pad for magnum shells is important
    I would not go below 7.5 lbs gun with 3 inch magnum and that can still bruise your shoulder
    with a box of shells in say less than an hours time. I'd rather have an 8 pounder. I think 6 guns shotguns are buffered to handle heavy loads better than what I have shot.

    I never will shoot 2 oz loads again and not 3.5 inch shells either.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,748 Senior Member
    My own personal experience is based on carrying out culls on wildlife which can involve shooting up to 500 rounds of 12g in a day.

    I own 2 O/U, 2 Pump actions and 3 1187's ( one which I use as a parts gun to keep the other two running) . I stopped using 3" shells quite a few years ago due to the increased recoil after a days culling. While they were effective, slapping the trigger on more than a box full meant the rest of the day was not pleasant.

    The difference in felt recoil between the 3 types of actions over a days culling was significant. With the 1187 I could shoot all day without any effects and that included many multiple magazine dumps. ( 5 shots). With the 870 pump action I could comfortably shoot between 2-3 boxes before the cumulative effects of recoil started to bite. The O/U was only taken on one cull as a backup to my 1187 ( I had loaned my second 1187 to another guy that turned up with a single shot :roll:) and after shooting 2 boxes of field loads I pulled the 'pin' on the rest of the day.

    My suggestion is this. Borrow a inertia operated 12g, head to a gun club and put between 2-3 boxes of shells through it and see how you feel when you have finished. Do the same thing a week later with a gas operated 12g. I think you will find that the cumulative effects of the the recoil will be different.

    You probably wont notice the difference in recoil between the 2 if you fire a few shots out of each.......but the cumulative effect of multiple shots can be significant.

    Your mileage may vary of course.

    ( As a side note, all my 1187's are getting to the point where I am looking at replacing them due to wear, my choice for a replacement at this stage is the Versamax V3)
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 11,112 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    My own personal experience is based on carrying out culls on wildlife which can involve shooting up to 500 rounds of 12g in a day.

    I own 2 O/U, 2 Pump actions and 3 1187's ( one which I use as a parts gun to keep the other two running) . I stopped using 3" shells quite a few years ago due to the increased recoil after a days culling. While they were effective, slapping the trigger on more than a box full meant the rest of the day was not pleasant.

    The difference in felt recoil between the 3 types of actions over a days culling was significant. With the 1187 I could shoot all day without any effects and that included many multiple magazine dumps. ( 5 shots). With the 870 pump action I could comfortably shoot between 2-3 boxes before the cumulative effects of recoil started to bite. The O/U was only taken on one cull as a backup to my 1187 ( I had loaned my second 1187 to another guy that turned up with a single shot :roll:) and after shooting 2 boxes of field loads I pulled the 'pin' on the rest of the day.

    My suggestion is this. Borrow a inertia operated 12g, head to a gun club and put between 2-3 boxes of shells through it and see how you feel when you have finished. Do the same thing a week later with a gas operated 12g. I think you will find that the cumulative effects of the the recoil will be different.

    You probably wont notice the difference in recoil between the 2 if you fire a few shots out of each.......but the cumulative effect of multiple shots can be significant.

    Your mileage may vary of course.

    ( As a side note, all my 1187's are getting to the point where I am looking at replacing them due to wear, my choice for a replacement at this stage is the Versamax V3)

    This is supposed to be a solution, please post up if you go this route.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,748 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    This is supposed to be a solution, please post up if you go this route.

    Will do...............after I finish paying for and getting my latest Gus out of purgatory.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,231 Senior Member
    I've never done a cull shoot like Orchidman, but dove hunting can cause you to go through a lot of ammo. And you're limited to three shots due to the migratory fowl rule. If you're on the far end of the field and the dove is coming from the other end of the field then it is experiencing a LOT of shooting at it. By the time it gets into range to you, it is on full afterburners and you can see the shockwave forming as it approaches the speed of sound. So you empty the shotgun, putting up 'flak' as it were hoping to connect to the near supersonic feathered missile. Even shooting 2 3/4" low brass field loads, my Rem. 870 pump was unpleasant to shoot for long periods. I usually took two .50 cal. ammo cans of my reloaded shotshells on a hunt, and came back with not many loaded rounds left. That's why my 870 got a thick Limbsaver recoil pad early on.

    I won a Remington 870 3 1/2" Mag. turkey gun at a Wild Turkey Federation raffle. I bought a box of five 3 1/2" mag turkey loads to try it out. It has a good recoil pad on it, too. I have 3 rounds of that 5 round box left. That thing is brutal shooting 3 1/2" mag loads, and the few times I took it duck hunting shooting 3" mag loads wasn't much better. The thing has a 24" barrel and wood furniture and weighs about 8 1/2 lbs. At least pass shooting ducks on the river you don't shoot that much! :roll2:
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • ojrojr Senior Member Posts: 866 Senior Member
    I recently bought a Remington V3
    I only did this after reading many reviews and trying it a few time in the store as I was going to buy another Beretta or Browning Maxus , however I am sold on this gun, absolute works, fits and shoots.
    It has the same gas system as it bigger brother the 3.5" versamax but being a 3" gun, it is not such a "Big' gun.
    I like it an thoroughly recommend it and the price is very good.
    My only gripe is I wish it had just one more shot capacity in standard form, how ever that ain't enough to sell it down and eventually a two shot mag extension will find it's way onto it when the occasion calls.
    The recoil is just so much more tolerable than my Miroku for big days out shooting.
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,765 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    The Stoeger, while a very nice gun, is an inertia system and the stock is not optimized for recoil absorption like it's Franchi and Benelli cousins. It's a little better but not much of an improvement over an OU or a pump. You fire a 3" mag out of that gun and it'll punch you in the cheek pretty good. I Kronos because I owned one for years. If you fire the same loads side by side with a REMINGTON 1100 or just about any semi-auto Beretta you will feel a tremendous difference in recoil.

    The Stoeger M-2000 action is the same as a Franchi. It, and the Franchi, differ slightly from the Benelli, in that the recoil spring terminates in the receiver, whereas the Benelli spring extends on into the stock. I didn't mean to suggest that the Stoeger was gas operated. I haven't shot gas guns much, since buying the Stoeger, so I can't really compare the recoil, but the Stoeger is fine with field loads. 3 or 3-12" duck loads might be a different story. I no longer duck hunt, so the Stoeger is fine for me.
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