Gun Trivia

JayhawkerJayhawker ModeratorPosts: 15,213 Senior Member
Just in case you ever wondered....A 16" 50 cal. Mk 7 Naval Rifle has a right hand twist of 1 in 25 in a 66 foot barrel...
Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"

Replies

  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,323 Senior Member
    Now I can finally sleep at night knowing this.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 5,766 Senior Member
    SIGgal wrote: »
    To be specific, right hand twist and indeed 1/25 twist. Iowa and Montana class ships used this very same gun. USS New Jersey is one such vessel.
    The newb knows her naval guns! Must be a New Jersey thing.:tooth:
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 19,898 Senior Member
    I used to work with a pressure test vessel that was actually made out of a 16" shell. It was built as a pressure tester at China Lake, probably in the 50s, and ended up at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Ca where I first saw it. It was kinda cool!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,213 Senior Member
    SIGgal wrote: »
    To be specific, right hand twist and indeed 1/25 twist. Iowa and Montana class ships used this very same gun. USS New Jersey is one such vessel.

    Montana Class , though approved, never got off the drawing board...no keels were ever laid...Navy decided it needed aircraft carriers worse.

    Would have been an awesome ship based on firepower alone....4 turrets mounting 12 16" rifles...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,213 Senior Member
    SIGgal wrote: »
    Sure is. Doesn't hurt that she can also use wiki lol

    I was kinda thinking that I:jester: :jester:
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,087 Senior Member
    Was there any kind of break in period, or just go out a blast away??!!:jester:
  • NCFUBARNCFUBAR Senior Member Posts: 4,324 Senior Member
    Big Al1 wrote: »
    Was there any kind of break in period, or just go out a blast away??!!:jester:

    Good question. Wonder if they clean after each round for "X" number of shots? Man, that would that some big patches and looooooong cleaning rod plus a lot of bore cleaner? Wonder if they use chipmunks or something way bigger?
    “The further a society drifts from truth ... the more it will hate those who speak it."
    - George Orwell
  • Jack BurtonJack Burton Member Posts: 379 Member
    What impresses me is the fire control computers they originally had were all cam, shaft, and gear driven.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1i-dnAH9Y4
    Imagine how they built these with no cnc, no pc's, not even a pocket calculator.
    Came for the fishing, stayed for the guns.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,987 Senior Member
    To think, I used to worry about flying into one of those shells, if I'd only known they were right hand twist I would have slept better.

    Just saying
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • hawk18hawk18 Senior Member Posts: 737 Senior Member
    Big Al1 wrote: »
    Was there any kind of break in period, or just go out a blast away??!!:jester:

    There was none on our 5"/38's. Just haul ass to Subic, rebarrel, haul ass back to the line and shoot. The most was around 1200, or so, in one 24 hour period with two barrels. You can judge your rifling by how crisp the smoke rings are. Our barrels had a ramrod and brush/swab attachments. Imagine what that would be like on 16"/50's.

    Hawk
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 7,100 Senior Member
    What impresses me is the fire control computers they originally had were all cam, shaft, and gear driven.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1i-dnAH9Y4
    Imagine how they built these with no cnc, no pc's, not even a pocket calculator.

    What's more impressive is that when they upgraded those ships in the '80s with Tomahawk cruise missiles, they left the targeting system for the 16-inchers alone, as there wasn't really any improving on it. Unlike your iPhone ballistic software, an EMP wouldn't phase it.

    The Iowa is parked about 70 miles from me, & I toured it a couple years ago. Truly impressive that such a thing can not only float, but slug along at over 30 mph. There's a stamped metal walkway around the bridge to go out and survey the horizon with your binoculars, but go inside and you're looking through a slit in well over a foot of solid steel

    On one of the turrets, there's a painted-over dip maybe a quarter-inch deep and perhaps 8 inches across with a painted yellow arrow pointing to it. If no one told you, you'd think it was just a shallow rust pit or some other tiny flaw in the steel. Nope. Hit from a Japanese 5" gun, Wonder if it pinged like a wine glass on impact. . .

    On the inside, even the light switches on the wall are solid to the point that you could take them off and make lethal clubs out of them.

    They've got a dummy shell and powder bags laid out on deck, & it struck me that the proportions were exactly that of a .30-06 or a .50 BMG. Guess they knew a good thing when they saw it. It also amuses me greatly that those big guns use a .30-06 blank as their primer.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,213 Senior Member
    I have been amazed by those guns since I was a kid and got to tour the U.S.S. Alabama shortly after she was turned into a museum. Back then they allowed tour groups inside the turrets and I could have spent the whole day in there.

    The Alabama is a South Dakota class BB with slightly different guns...16" 45 cal. MK 6...but damned impressive

    One interesting story is that during an air attack in 1944 her #9 5" gun mount fired a shell into the #5 gun mount...killing 5...certainly Murphy's Law at work...I have had the opportunity to converse with the son of one of the men who repaired the damage....you can still see the repair today..
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,190 Senior Member
    The actual barrel was fitted with a rifled liner, like our normal hunting rifles are repaired when the rifling worn out or pitted. After test firing the barrels had to go back to the factory to bob the liner; it stretched during test firing.

    For the real 'gun geeks' here's some info about the guns, and their manufacture, and some ballistics data. Cool stuff! And those 16" guns were also used for coastal defense.

    http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNUS_16-50_mk7.php

    http://www.oocities.org/fort_tilden/16ingun.html
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



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