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Nebraska bird hunting sucks

Six-GunSix-Gun Senior MemberEastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
Ok, now that we have that little fib out of the way to throw off the internet scouters, let me tell you about yet another amazing day on the Nebraska public lands.

In short, Haidar and I both limited out on teal once again, this time by 7AM. We were done so quickly that we had to come up with an alternate plan for the rest of the morning. More on that in a bit...

We also brought his brother-in-law along, Anmar (who, if you recall, is the guy I went turkey hunting with back in the Spring), for his first-ever teal hunt. He struggled a good bit, only bagging 2 birds entire the morning, but he has also never shot at any bird this fast and is working with a brand new Stoeger M3500. He has some pretty significant mechanics issues we'll have to iron out, most notably his propensity to keep his face off of the stock when swinging on a moving target. It's absolutely killing his accuracy, as the barrel is looking somewhere totally different than he's intending to point it. He was pretty flustered by the end, but we encouraged him and promised to get him to a skeet range for discipline training as soon as possible. He knows he has work to do, but overall he had fun.

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After Anmar headed home, Haidar and I broke out our over/under upland guns and some steel #7 shot to work the nearby mudflats in search of snipe. I had never hunted these fast, jinky birds before, but Haidar had promised me for some time that he would show me how to hunt them. I found out quickly why the term "sniper" carries their call. They are a true test of wing shooting skill.

Ironically enough, I killed my very first bird with one shot. It took significantly more than that to bag the other two that I would kill a bit later. We closed out with 9 snipe total + one unlucky dove that flushed from the nearby grass during our walk. Sadly for him, he's in season right now. All in all, snipe hunting was WAY more fun than I anticipated - like a waterfowl/upland combo hunt chasing what is actually a migratory webless game bird.

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It goes without saying that this was, once again, a helluva hunt. That's two teal limits in two hunts for me (three in a row for Haidar since he also went out yesterday and limited out solo), plus an opening day dove limit. The best part is that all of this was on public land. The bird hunting here is so good, it's easy to forget that the state is 90%-privately owned! These little public gems are just that well-managed that they are absolutely worth visiting. I you haven't tried wingshooting here, you're missing out!

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Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Thornton COPosts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I have never hunted birds, ever.
    It looks like good exercise.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Between the 200-yard, chest-deep slog through a tangle of weeds to set up duck decoys, and the muddy walk through cattle-printed muds flats, it's definitely not something you want to try if you don't like a challenge. Exercise is assured.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,281 Senior Member
    Funny that your friend had such difficulty...according to the Discovery Channel, teal are the slowest flying ducks and easy prey for the novice hunter...Note: the guy who made this statement has obviously never seen a teal in full afterburner....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Funny that your friend had such difficulty...according to the Discovery Channel, teal are the slowest flying ducks and easy prey for the novice hunter...Note: the guy who made this statement has obviously never seen a teal in full afterburner....

    Hah! Teal. Slow. Right. Yeah, he definitely has never seen a teal with the can lit and snapping side to side on it's way to land. A novice hunter doesn't stand a chance.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,281 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Hah! Teal. Slow. Right. Yeah, he definitely has never seen a teal with the can lit and snapping side to side on it's way to land. A novice hunter doesn't stand a chance.

    And a dozen of them flying in a mob...... doesn't increase the odds of connecting...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    And a dozen of them flying in a mob...... doesn't increase the odds of connecting...

    It's times like that when you realize that telling a noobie to "pick just one bird" is futile. They're gonna shoot right in the center of the flock and miss everything.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • NNNN Senior Member NCPosts: 25,221 Senior Member
    Snipe hunting alone can be fun, flush one out of range and they probably will fly back over ya to take a look see.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Colorado SpringsPosts: 7,821 Senior Member
    In Louisiana they're called woodcock. I'm no good at quail, but these things are almost impossible to hit on a regular basis.

    Quail...not easy......are easy compared to these.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Dellrose TNPosts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Is it true some dogs don't like the taste of snipe? I've heard a few bird dog trainers say its difficult to get them to retrieve the little buggers!
    Jerry
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Woodcock are actually a different critter as it relates to the NE hunting regs, though the "woodcock" name coliqually covers both snipe (more of a wading bird) and American woodcock (a true woodland dweller). The big tell is that the woodcock (aka timberdoodle) looks like its eyes sit almost under its beak and is a chestnut brown. Both are virtually impossible to see sitting still on the ground of their respective habitats.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,281 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Is it true some dogs don't like the taste of snipe? I've heard a few bird dog trainers say its difficult to get them to retrieve the little buggers!
    Jerry

    Never had an issue with my dogs retrieving anything but doves...too many loose feathers I suspect...my old lab would pick them up by a wingtip to bring them in. With my current dog however, it's an even bet whether he will retrieve it or swallow it....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,281 Senior Member
    Used to hunt woodcock a lot, under the auspices of grouse hunting. If you want to see great dog work, it's the perfect bird... usually hold tight for a point with rare wild flushes. Don't shoot them anymore though...a hard luck little bird that I don't really care for as table fare...I'd rather just watch them fly....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    They are most certainly impossible to see. Until your 12" away from one and it explodes at your feet, causing you to full your pants with poo.

    I enjoy your hunting report, but there will never be one better than the turkey hunt. I'm still rolling thinking about that.

    Wait...you referring to the turkey hunt in Montana that may have involved a stranger pocketing another stranger's poo rags?
    Teach wrote: »
    Is it true some dogs don't like the taste of snipe? I've heard a few bird dog trainers say its difficult to get them to retrieve the little buggers!
    Jerry
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Never had an issue with my dogs retrieving anything but doves...too many loose feathers I suspect...my old lab would pick them up by a wingtip to bring them in. With my current dog however, it's an even bet whether he will retrieve it or swallow it....

    I didn't bring my dog on this hunt because the water is just too deep for him in the teal hole, but I do wonder if he would've retrieved a snipe. He absolutely HATES retrieving doves and will spit them out just a few yards after picking one up.

    And woodcock...yeah, not the best tasting bird. They eat a ton of worms and taste accordingly.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Colorado SpringsPosts: 7,821 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Used to hunt woodcock a lot, Don't shoot them anymore though...a hard luck little bird that I don't really care for as table fare...I'd rather just watch them fly....

    Wow. I think you just channeled my dad. Possibly word for word, as best I recall.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Funny that your friend had such difficulty...according to the Discovery Channel, teal are the slowest flying ducks and easy prey for the novice hunter...Note: the guy who made this statement has obviously never seen a teal in full afterburner....

    That's the dumbest thing I ever heard. They're freaking swamp rockets!

    How many shells have I wasted on them? I've killed a few, but when they come through you better not blink. And it's not so much they're fast, they're quick, I mean quick to turn and whip around. Put a north wind on their tail and they're a blurrrr.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    I have never hunted birds, ever.
    It looks like good exercise.

    Man early, you need to try it. But go shoot some skeet first, lots of skeet.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 28,061 Senior Member
    Looks like a wonderful time.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member South DakotaPosts: 2,040 Senior Member
    Looks fun. Way to utilize what is available.
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    bellcat wrote: »
    Looks fun. Way to utilize what is available.
    If you make it down here, bring along some waders or well-fitting mud boots (whatever won't suction off of your feet when you go to step out of the mud). We'll hit the snipe flats.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Yes. The Montana hunt. I've got tears in my eyes laughing about it again.
    Just imagine trying to keep a straight face as the guy who just picked up the poo rags is wiping his hands all over your buddy's truck...
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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