To/too/two/to a d fro

hawk18hawk18 Senior MemberPosts: 728 Senior Member
Here's a question you don't hear often. How sharp an edge should you put on a fro? I bought this a few years back and just now made a handle for it. It appears to be hand forged but, even though it's one piece, the eye is arc welded, not forge welded. I may use it to split kindling but it will mostly be a wall hanger.



Hawk

Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,830 Senior Member
    Want to make a bunch of cedar shakes?
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • hawk18hawk18 Senior Member Posts: 728 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Want to make a bunch of cedar shakes?

    I might, just to see if I can.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,891 Senior Member
    As sharp as you can get it without the edge chipping or breaking when you strike the other side.

    You want it to bite into the wood right away where you place it and not bounce at the strike.

    I admit I'm just guessing; but, I based the guess on other tools used make kindling----such as my negrito bolo and a hatchet.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,040 Senior Member
    That's a long froe! I'd say about the same edge as you put on an axe, but I don't know.*

    Found this on the web. Apparently, you don't need to put an edge on the blade.


    "Key to maintenance of the blade is, first of all, never hit it with anything but a wooden mallet. Secondly, it does not have to be sharp. It just has to have a blade that has the curved bevels shown but the edge must be dull. A flat of 1/32" on the edge is about right."

    *Wrong. No edge and a good reason to not sharpen it.

    http://www.leevalley.com/us/shopping/Instructions.aspx?p=67296
    Not too many problems you can't fix
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  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,891 Senior Member
    Interesting----must need well seasoned wood from straight grained log sections, then.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • hawk18hawk18 Senior Member Posts: 728 Senior Member
    Thanks Gene L. Interestingly, that shows a double convex bevel and mine has a single flat bevel.

    Hawk
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,736 Senior Member
    I used one belonging to my Granddad in GA helping him put cedar shakes on a corn crib. He had it axe sharp, both sides of the blade beveled. and a good wooden mallet, handmade from hickory to strike the blade. Once you get started and learn how to split the shakes off the piece of log, it goes pretty quick. A dull blade will bounce, and is the devil on the hand holding the handle. If you're gonna make it a wallhanger, sharpen both sides of the edge and put a good coat of oil on it. Good tools deserve some TLC!
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,540 Senior Member
    hawk18 wrote: »
    Thanks Gene L. Interestingly, that shows a double convex bevel and mine has a single flat bevel.
    Hawk


    A froe with a double convex blade is used more like a wedge to split shakes so it doesn't need to be sharp. A single bevel froe like you have is used to true beams and is kept sharp. Think of it as a really wide wood chisel. Sometimes a froe like that was used to start the beams and a draw knife was used to finish them.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
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