So we need more transfer of wealth??

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Replies

  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,536 Senior Member
    horselips wrote: »
    You don't run the program all the time - just when there is a shortage of skilled labor. You can limit which contractors get the free labor by limiting convicts' use on low income-middle income housing - set an arbitrary limit of homes costing $250,000 or less -or whatever. When a "class" of convicts graduates, you stop the program until they are hired out. You can also set a limit on how many times a builder can use convict labor - say once every 5 years for no longer than 1 year. again, whatever! GEEZUS, we went to the freaking moon half a century ago, I'm sure the whiz kids in gov't can figure out a way to make it work.

    Or the contractor pays the wage to the prison sys, the prison sys cover health care and ins. It isnt free labor (FYI illegal) The contractor gets cheap labot, the prisoner pays part of his incarceration and learns a skill.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,025 Senior Member
    Bull.

    It took me exactly 10 seconds to search help wanted ads for my county to find jobs as a Fedex driver and a UPS driver. Both have medical and pay fair. Pass a drug test, have a clean driving record and you can have a career or at least a decent living. You have to move your butt all day long and that seems to be the problem.

    Not Bull. This ain't PA. Just my observations on construction sites I visit. I said construction, not truck driving work.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,536 Senior Member
    10 sec, 1500 mi away. Wellfield and Morton bldgs are hiring. FYI Fedex is hiring in Casper, roustabouts in riverton, insulator in casper 16-24/hr w/bennies, ......25 openings BTW

    https://www.helpwanted.com/wyoming-general-laborer-jobs
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    So you keep a full time staff on the payroll for any conceivable job or do you pass up anything that will expand your business? Second, he has a full time crew of skilled labor, he needs additional semi or non skilled labor for different jobs.
    My people are skilled or semi skilled and it takes time and money to get them that way. I have been growing but, intentionally slowly so we do not overpromise to our clients. For overflow, I have some high school and college kids that are available weekends and all summer long that will have opportunities in the future to come on permanently if they would like.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    You actually are making the point though. He need workers, the ones in the US are either stoned or dont want to work, which leaves furriners.
    My point was that there really is no shortage. There may be a shortage of quality workers at $10/hr for a certain job, but I bet there isn't at $20. These people that claim they can't find good help aren't telling the whole truth-- they can't find good help for the price they are paying. Because of that, they cry that they need to import workers from 3rd World countries to cover the shortage (at that wage). If Fed-EX really wants that driver, maybe $24/hr isn't enough to lure people in. If Houston wants construction workers, maybe they aren't paying enough to lure my crew down there.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,697 Senior Member
    Wait, how would they compete with the free prison labor once they are released? Why would any contruction company or contractor pay them if the can get free labor? How do you determine which companies get access to free labor and how much?

    It appears that someone figured all of that out over 35 years ago and without your help. I worked for a large furniture company in Wisconsin while I was going to school in the early eighties. Every morning, a bus from the Oregon (a town outside of Madison)State Prison dropped a bunch of guys off at the plant and picked them up at the end of the shift. Some of their wage went to them, and some went to the prison, and the company got a tax break for using them. Of course they used trusted guys that were close to getting out and the company got cheap labor and a tax break, the prison made some money to help defer the cost of their incarceration, and the guys learned a skill. There were several different industries in the Madison area that utilized their work release program and it worked well.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,744 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    My point was that there really is no shortage. There may be a shortage of quality workers at $10/hr for a certain job, but I bet there isn't at $20. These people that claim they can't find good help aren't telling the whole truth-- they can't find good help for the price they are paying. Because of that, they cry that they need to import workers from 3rd World countries to cover the shortage (at that wage). If Fed-EX really wants that driver, maybe $24/hr isn't enough to lure people in. If Houston wants construction workers, maybe they aren't paying enough to lure my crew down there.
    But that would reduce profits and increase inflation. Why would business want to do that when they can just buy a few politicians to ensure them a steady flow of cheap, indentured servants?
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,548 Senior Member
    And here is the gorilla in the room.....

    I was a construction bid estimator for 23 years. Higher labor costs and higher material costs were factored into the bid long before a contract was signed. Granted, unforeseen market circumstances (like the doubling of copper prices in '86) can absolutely destroy a contractor, but for the most part, much like business tax increases, they are passed on to the consumer. There's really no such thing as a "business tax". It's all passed on to the end user.

    What puts more reputable contractors out of business isn't taxes or labor shortages. It's waiting out the incompetent newbies to crater. But for every one of the newbies that go down, there's two more waiting in the wings to take their place. And the cycle continues.

    Incompetent competition is the bane of every competent contractor.

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,536 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    My point was that there really is no shortage. There may be a shortage of quality workers at $10/hr for a certain job, but I bet there isn't at $20. These people that claim they can't find good help aren't telling the whole truth-- they can't find good help for the price they are paying. Because of that, they cry that they need to import workers from 3rd World countries to cover the shortage (at that wage). If Fed-EX really wants that driver, maybe $24/hr isn't enough to lure people in. If Houston wants construction workers, maybe they aren't paying enough to lure my crew down there.
    You are going to pay 20/hr + bennies to a rake driver? That is a entry level job. You work as Manual Earth Transport until such time as you prove that you are going to show up the day after payday for a few months, and you might get to move the skid steer. If you take the 15/hr and get hammered Thurs night and dont show up for work, it isnt eh contractors fault.

    I know this guy, not real well but in passing, he isnt paying min wage. You dont landscape the US open as a fly by night. He needs people who will show up. it was cost effective for him to bring Nicaraguans over, buy a house for them, get their green cards for them, pay them and get a car for them because he cant get Muricans to show up.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    You are going to pay 20/hr + bennies to a rake driver?
    If I need one bad enough, I will. Who are you to determine what people get paid? I am not a fan of minimum wage, and I am not a fan of maximum wage either. If a fast food place needs to pay $20/hr to get someone to show up and flip burgers, so be it. If they can get them to show up for $5/hr, I am cool with that too. For the right price, some of these people will put down the bong, get off their mom's couch and take work seriously.
    it was cost effective for him to bring Nicaraguans over, buy a house for them, get their green cards for them, pay them and get a car for them because he cant get Muricans to show up for what he is paying.
    I fixed that for you.

    It isn't my fault some guy bids a job, unaware that the labor market may command a higher wage than what he is willing to pay. It sounds like he is trying to blame American workers for his poor business decisions and I am not buying it.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    For the record the total number of families getting cash assistance is 1.6M or about 1.5%. Cash assistance maxes out at between $200-600 a month in most states and is limited in the number of years you can receive it and has work activity requirements of 20-30 hours a week depending on the age of your children.

    singlemotherguide.com/temporary-cash-assistance-for-the-poor/
    For the record, realize that while not cash, there is a monetary value to the non-cash assistance that people get. What is medicaid, food tamps, and housing assistance (among other things) worth a month? I would guess a whole lot more than the cash payouts.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,548 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »

    It isn't my fault some guy bids a job, unaware that the labor market may command a higher wage than what he is willing to pay. It sounds like he is trying to blame American workers for his poor business decisions and I am not buying it.


    Yeah. That's kind of what I implied. Or actually said. Or maybe both.

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    Cpj has already made it known that he will switch careers for the right price. I will travel wherever you want me to work... for the right price. I have even said on one occasion or another that I will gladly work in the fields picking lettuce or whatever-- but I am not doing it for the $9/hr they want to pay.

    UPS and FedEx are hiring right now and offering an ok wage to attract temporary holiday delivery help. Come December 26th, they will be looking for another job. Benefits will not be available for that short of employment. Is it worth it to someone to quit their $12/hr year round job to come work for UPS for 2 months making $16/hr? I am not sure. That is for people to decide themselves and I would not hold anything against a person that decided to stay at their steady job for less cash.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    I had an attorney for a mortgage company command me to do this (like I was some peon), because his time cost $200/hr to do that. I laughed at him and went about my day.

    His time was worth considerably less than mine.
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 9,561 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    For the record, realize that while not cash, there is a monetary value to the non-cash assistance that people get. What is medicaid, food tamps, and housing assistance (among other things) worth a month? I would guess a whole lot more than the cash payouts.

    He's talking about single males not getting $$$$...... Guess what? I have two in my immediate family that have been getting $$$$ for years on end. How?

    Their baby momma gets the $$$ while 'Daddy' maintains a fake address so the Gov doesn't know they they actually live together.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,744 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    For the record, realize that while not cash, there is a monetary value to the non-cash assistance that people get. What is medicaid, food tamps, and housing assistance (among other things) worth a month? I would guess a whole lot more than the cash payouts.
    No doubt, but there is a persistent belief that there is some huge number of people living high on the hog off government checks. And honestly a lot of it is based on racism. I don't know exactly where these myths come from.

    Sure there are some single moms who scrape by just on government assistance. Yes there are some unemployed kids enabled by middle class parents who let them live in their houses. Yes a fair number of people make a living from illegal activity, primarily selling drugs. Yes more people collect disability checks than probably should, but most of them are middle aged rural white people living in places with no jobs who refuse to move. Yes too many people in this country collect food stamps, but the vast majority of them work jobs that don't pay a living wage so they're effectively a subsidy for businesses to keep wages low. Same thing for help with healthcare.

    Most of the programs are targeted at or limited to people with children which is my pet peeves. We give poor people way too much incentive to procreate. We need to do the opposite of that. But that's my bias.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    My thoughts on some of this stuff, and they're worth what you're paying for them.

    1. A minimum wage job is NOT a career; it's a starting point up the ladder. Squatting on the bottom rung of the ladder and griping is for those with no ambition to better themselves.
    2. Working at a minimum wage job and being stuck there is a choice. Some didn't pay attention in school; a bad choice. Some started working on building a rap sheet early in life doing crime like robbery, burglary, selling drugs; a bad choice. Others do not avail themselves to training programs to better their condition because it involves working to learn a higher paying job; bad choice. Work ethic is not hereditary; it's a learned behavior.
    3. National minimum wage is a farce. Cost of living is not the same plain vanilla flavor nationwide. California and the West Coast, and the NE Coast states have a higher cost of living than the South. Fed and State governments make that so with regulations and taxes. Minimum wage job is a foot in the door, not a permanent condition to be desired. And minimum wage was not ever supposed to be a living wage; the higher paying jobs are there if one is motivated to get up off their dead rear end and onto their dying feet and work and train for them. Learn a skill with the available programs or wallow in self pity; that's another choice.
    4. Channeling everyone into a 4 year college degree is another farce. If one is honest, then they will know that some people are doomed to fail at that path. A 2 year Associate degree can open some real opportunities for jobs that don't need a 4 year degree. And the trades schools can put someone in a field where there are good paying jobs with little to no student debt at graduation.

    WANTING a better higher paying job, and being WILLING to put forth the EFFORT and WORK to GET that higher paying job are not the same thing. Anyone expecting to make a viable living off minimum wage is just lying to themselves.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I think a lot more wealth gets transfered into corporate subsidies (aka corperate wellfare) than individual wellfare programs.

    A lot more.

    A whole bunch more.

    Like a really big amount.

    Just sayin'.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,697 Senior Member
    No doubt, but there is a persistent belief that there is some huge number of people living high on the hog off government checks. And honestly a lot of it is based on racism. I don't know exactly where these myths come from.


    I think that you're a little out of touch with what many think along with other aspects of reality. The issue is not about people receiving various forms of assistance living in the lap of luxury, it's about able bodied people working the system for assistance and choosing not to work. You can go almost anywhere in the country and find healthy, able bodied people living adequately without working or looking for work while claiming that the "system" is against them and they can't find jobs making a wage that they're worthy of.
    As for most people receiving assistance being rural middle aged white people, you tried that bs in the past and it was shot down and it still hasn't become true. Spinning numbers and percentages can make Manny things appear factual.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,744 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    I think that you're a little out of touch with what many think along with other aspects of reality. The issue is not about people receiving various forms of assistance living in the lap of luxury, it's about able bodied people working the system for assistance and choosing not to work. You can go almost anywhere in the country and find healthy, able bodied people living adequately without working or looking for work while claiming that the "system" is against them and they can't find jobs making a wage that they're worthy of.
    As for most people receiving assistance being rural middle aged white people, you tried that bs in the past and it was shot down and it still hasn't become true. Spinning numbers and percentages can make Manny things appear factual.

    Got it. People think there is a significant percentage of the population who are able bodied and working the system. I don't doubt that is something lots of people believe. Republican politicians have been peddling their welfare queen stories for decades. It doesn't make them true beyond anecdotes. Are there people who abuse the system? Almost certainly. Are most people even aware how any of our social welfare systems work? Very doubtful. Again cash welfare only applies to families with children and is a very small amount of cash (few hundred $ a month). The primary other way that people can get cash is disability which will pay up to $1,100/month. The system can be gamed, but is a bit harder and requires jumping through lots of hoops. 1.6 Million collect welfare checks, 10.2 million collect disability checks. If you're worried about people gaming the social welfare systems we need to focus on disability and not welfare. But we also need to be careful to not make it too hard. We need/want people who are genuinely disabled to be able to get benefits. The average age of disability recipients is 54. Here is a map of the percentage of people collecting disability based on where they live. Notice significantly higher fractions in rural areas and red states...

    1400x-1.png
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • sgtrock21sgtrock21 Senior Member Posts: 1,610 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    In my mind, "cash welfare" and ANY government assistance are the same thing. As with I'm guessing a lot of others here. Because, well, if you're rent and food is subsidized, that's the same as......cash.
    You forgot utilities, cell phone, and a computer to search for a job. Hah, Hah, Hah!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,697 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    In my mind, "cash welfare" and ANY government assistance are the same thing. As with I'm guessing a lot of others here. Because, well, if your rent and food is subsidized, that's the same as......cash.

    That's been pointed out but he keeps trying. By specifying cash welfare the numbers change and the statistics can be spun into anything.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    Yep. I paid out over $13,000 in CASH this year for health insurance premiums others got for free. That is money they are free to spend on something else. Food stamp allowance for a family of 4 is $649 a month. I buy food with my CASH. So even without cash assistance, a family of 4 gets at least $20k in non cash compensation where I have to work to make cash to pay the same. And that comes out of my taxable income. Go right to the monthly limit of $2665/month in gross income (for a family of 4) and with their income and non-cash benefits, they have a lifestyle of a family making $53,000/year.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    Median income last year was $56k.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    Yes too many people in this country collect food stamps, but the vast majority of them work jobs that don't pay a living wage so they're effectively a subsidy for businesses to keep wages low. Same thing for help with healthcare.

    Most of the programs are targeted at or limited to people with children which is my pet peeves. We give poor people way too much incentive to procreate. We need to do the opposite of that. But that's my bias.
    I agree with all of this, but can't really see a way around the kid thing. Those kids aren't responsible for their parents poor choices and it seems impossible to not punish the children any other way.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,230 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    That food stamp allowance would be real close to what I spend for a family of four. And in reality, a VERY realistic if not abundant amount if one spent those dollars wisely.
    I always buy stuff in bulk when it is cheap or in season, so if I really wanted to, I could stay in that budget and then some. Watching idiots screw up their "Food Stamp Challenge" cracks me up.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,697 Senior Member
    Got it. People think there is a significant percentage of the population who are able bodied and working the system. I don't doubt that is something lots of people believe. Republican politicians have been peddling their welfare queen stories for decades. It doesn't make them true beyond anecdotes. Are there people who abuse the system? Almost certainly. Are most people even aware how any of our social welfare systems work? Very doubtful. Again cash welfare only applies to families with children and is a very small amount of cash (few hundred $ a month). The primary other way that people can get cash is disability which will pay up to $1,100/month. The system can be gamed, but is a bit harder and requires jumping through lots of hoops. 1.6 Million collect welfare checks, 10.2 million collect disability checks. If you're worried about people gaming the social welfare systems we need to focus on disability and not welfare. But we also need to be careful to not make it too hard. We need/want people who are genuinely disabled to be able to get benefits. The average age of disability recipients is 54. Here is a map of the percentage of people collecting disability based on where they live. Notice significantly higher fractions in rural areas and red states...

    1400x-1.png

    That is the same spin that you tried before. Those numbers are percentages of the populations of those sparsely populated rural areas.
    Not overall numbers!
    you're trying to use those pecentages to represent something that they're not. (Again)
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    Got it. People think there is a significant percentage of the population who are able bodied and working the system. I don't doubt that is something lots of people believe. Republican politicians have been peddling their welfare queen stories for decades. It doesn't make them true beyond anecdotes. Are there people who abuse the system? Almost certainly. Are most people even aware how any of our social welfare systems work? Very doubtful. Again cash welfare only applies to families with children and is a very small amount of cash (few hundred $ a month). The primary other way that people can get cash is disability which will pay up to $1,100/month. The system can be gamed, but is a bit harder and requires jumping through lots of hoops. 1.6 Million collect welfare checks, 10.2 million collect disability checks. If you're worried about people gaming the social welfare systems we need to focus on disability and not welfare. But we also need to be careful to not make it too hard. We need/want people who are genuinely disabled to be able to get benefits. The average age of disability recipients is 54. Here is a map of the percentage of people collecting disability based on where they live. Notice significantly higher fractions in rural areas and red states...

    1400x-1.png

    Did you EVEN look at that map and the arrows? Do you even KNOW what is the major industry in those counties? Do you have a CLUE why there are a lot of disabled people in the South?

    Let me 'splain that map to you. The counties with the arrows pointing to VA are COAL MINING AREAS. Heard of black lung and other diseases, lack of medical treatment, and work injuries from backbreaking manual labor in the mines? Did you even think about WHY?

    Those other dark areas are mostly farming with some mining and other dangerous jobs. Farming is a dangerous profession. So is mining. So is timber cutting and logging. And those dark areas have a LOT of veterans from WWII to the latest wars that are disabled due to their injuries. The South supplies the military with soldiers, Marines, Navy, and Air Force personnel all out of proportion to their population percentage, and ESPECIALLY little West Virginia.

    North and South Carolina, and and some of the GA, and Alabama dark areas coincide with military bases for the most part. Now I wonder why that would be? Got any ideas? Might it be that there are active and discharged disabled living within reasonable driving distance to the VA Hospitals in those areas?

    Lots more dangerous than being a prairie dog in a cubicle farm where the worst injury incurred is most likely a paper cut or spilling hot coffee on one's junk.

    Jumpin' Jesus on a pogo stick! Posting some map with absolutely NO EXPLANATION or breakdown of the disabilities is as useless as teats on a boar hog! It proves nothing and is meaningless without the breakdown of the disabilities it is supposed to represent, and their cause.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,744 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Did you EVEN look at that map and the arrows? Do you even KNOW what is the major industry in those counties? Do you have a CLUE why there are a lot of disabled people in the South?

    Let me 'splain that map to you. The counties with the arrows pointing to VA are COAL MINING AREAS. Heard of black lung and other diseases, lack of medical treatment, and work injuries from backbreaking manual labor in the mines? Did you even think about WHY?

    Those other dark areas are mostly farming with some mining and other dangerous jobs. Farming is a dangerous profession. So is mining. So is timber cutting and logging. And those dark areas have a LOT of veterans from WWII to the latest wars that are disabled due to their injuries. The South supplies the military with soldiers, Marines, Navy, and Air Force personnel all out of proportion to their population percentage, and ESPECIALLY little West Virginia.

    North and South Carolina, and and some of the GA, and Alabama dark areas coincide with military bases for the most part. Now I wonder why that would be? Got any ideas? Might it be that there are active and discharged disabled living within reasonable driving distance to the VA Hospitals in those areas?

    Lots more dangerous than being a prairie dog in a cubicle farm where the worst injury incurred is most likely a paper cut or spilling hot coffee on one's junk.

    Jumpin' Jesus on a pogo stick! Posting some map with absolutely NO EXPLANATION or breakdown of the disabilities is as useless as teats on a boar hog! It proves nothing and is meaningless without the breakdown of the disabilities it is supposed to represent, and their cause.
    So you're saying is that maybe a large chunk of the people on disability are actually legitimately disabled and not just leaches abusing the system?
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,536 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    If I need one bad enough, I will. Who are you to determine what people get paid? I am not a fan of minimum wage, and I am not a fan of maximum wage either. If a fast food place needs to pay $20/hr to get someone to show up and flip burgers, so be it. If they can get them to show up for $5/hr, I am cool with that too. For the right price, some of these people will put down the bong, get off their mom's couch and take work seriously.
    I fixed that for you.

    It isn't my fault some guy bids a job, unaware that the labor market may command a higher wage than what he is willing to pay. It sounds like he is trying to blame American workers for his poor business decisions and I am not buying it.

    Hardly unaware. When the pay is equal to or greater than the competitors, and the bet you can get is someone who will only work past payday 1, it is not cost effective to pay more.

    As to your point about FedEx looking for seasonal workers, wrong. They will be at work 26 Dec, and likely as long as they keep showing up.
    I put the telecom into one of the largest distribution operations that was built from the ground and opened up last year. Ads for drivers and package handlers have been up since day 1 -90. They pay what they do and have churn. OK, so what? If one chooses to work, you can work at a starting wage that you can live on. If you stay and are competent, you get more. Quit because you think the world owes you a living and you will be out od work. IAW your plan, they should not have opened the distribution center because they are not going to pay skilled labor wages to package handlers because they seem to still be looking for workers.
    If I need one bad enough, I will. Who are you to determine what people get paid?
    If it was me doing the hiring, I would be the payee. That puts me in the ultimate position to determine what people who work for me get paid.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
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