Poor in Merica

2

Replies

  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    I don't think there is such thing as too many vegetables as long as you get some fats and quality protein.
    ...and that takes us back full circle to cooking vegetables like crap. Of course people don't want to eat them when they are cooked terribly!
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    Not when you put potatoes in as a vegetable and tell people to eat a LOT of them.

    Yep...

    https://www.cnpp.usda.gov/sites/default/files/archived_projects/FGPPamphlet.pdf
    Overkill is underrated.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,825 Senior Member
    Jerm,
    You've bothered to learn how to cook your food. How many folks don't like healthy food because it "tastes bad" or has a bad texture? And how much of that is because person cooking the food doesn't know what the devil they're doing? I cooked some asparagus for some folks who said they didn't like it - they loved it! Later I had the asparagus they were used to: canned and cooked to a big pile of mush. OTOH, cheap starchy foods are easy to get, harder to "ruin" it seems, and even when overdone taste better, generally!

    Don't get me started on food education in this country...

    I remember my Mom thinking that creamed (canned) asparagus on toast was a delicacy.....a disgusting mess. Never liked it. Moved to MI and discovered that lightly steamed with a bit of butter and salt, the stuff is delicious...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    Somebody on here said to grill asparagus. Olive oil, Kosher salt, pepper... delicious!
    Overkill is underrated.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    Roasted is good too.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,661 Senior Member

    Holy crap:
    Aren’t starchy
    foods fattening?
    No. It’s what you add to
    these foods or cook with
    them that adds most of the
    calories. For example:
    margarine or butter on
    bread, cream or cheese
    sauces on pasta, and the
    sugar and fat used with the
    flour in making cookies.

    That is so wrong, it's not even funny
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I like canned ass pa rag us, but it's crap compared to fresh, lightly cooked.
    I will admit to buying a can or two every few years. It is ok but I don't even consider it in any way shape or form the equivalent of fresh asparagus-- and especially fresh Michigan asparagus in season. My canned weakness is peas. Frozen peas are excellent and fresh ones are sublime, but I keep a few cans stashed in the pantry for a quick snack-- I eat them straight from the can.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,571 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    ...and your body will handle those sugars exactly the same way if you were mainlining corn syrup. People are idiots.
    Yeah I did a good bit of research on it and yeah body handles it the same, problem is it's in everything by the pound.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Hell no. Canned peas are disgusting.
    I think Jerm got possessed by a bearwalk....
    Overkill is underrated.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,571 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    That's only true if you do all of your shopping at some boutique grocery store like "Whole Foods". I can run down to our local grocery store and get a huge pork loin for 15 bucks and have enough lean protein for three or four meals. And a full meal at McDonald's hasn't been $3-4 since the early eighties.
    A mcdouble has like 500 calories and is $1.50 ($1 sometimes or used to be a year or two ago) a giant soda is $1 most of the time. Throw in 500-600 calories of fries for a buck or two and you're near your daily calorie needs.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,571 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    That is truth. Obesity and being poor CAN* be a symptom of the same problem- being lazy.

    *not always IS, by often
    Can't disagree with that.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    The Washington Post has a couple of articles that I found interesting. One is mocking Gwyneth Paltrow when she took the Food Stamp Challenge. The other discusses the issue of food deserts-- I can understand where some people may have issues taking advantage of the sales and values I get when your transportation is a subway, city bus, or walking. Living without a deep freezer would put a crimp in my style too, but those cost around the same as a new TV, so that is a matter of priorities.
    Gwyneth....
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/04/17/a-hungry-gwyneth-paltrow-fails-the-food-stamp-challenge-four-days-in/?utm_term=.624dc0fe9084
    Food deserts...
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2015/04/14/what-gwyneth-paltrows-food-stamp-challenge-gets-totally-wrong-about-poverty/?utm_term=.0f0f78a3ff09
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    ...and that's another problem. People wind up drinking their calories. Some don't know it. Co-worker was in a gym an overheard a personal trainer talking with a rather large woman. When he asked her what she drank every day and how much, she said something to the effect of it doesn't matter, there's no calories in what you drink.

    I think she drank 3 or 4 sodas per day. Maybe more. She was astounded there were calories in sodas. And in sweet tea. But she was trying to learn.


    I just looked up the calories and sugar in a large McDonald's Sweet Tea - it's something a lot of folks around here like to drink. Holy cow. 160 calories and 38 g of sugar.... It's in 32 oz., but I know folks who drink one or two of those per day. (edited to correct McDonald's new numbers. It was 280 calories and 69 g.)
    Overkill is underrated.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    I think Jerm got possessed by a bearwalk....
    I never claimed to be normal. Lunch today is sardines with hot sauce and pickled jalapenos, fresh spicy (with some of BML's evil peppers) homemade sauerkraut, and cold leftover brussels sprouts from last night.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,326 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Most people in America don't have the slightest concept of what "poor" is.....I have made ambulance calls to houses with dirt floors that had a satellite dish, a large screen TV and a new F150 in the drive way...the owner going near 400 pounds and the house knee-deep in McDonald's and Twinkie wrappers......America has the richest poor people in the world..,

    Same impression....poor people here (And I'm talking stone age poor) would LOVE to live in the conditions you describe.
    Yes, eating healthy in the US can get expensive; friend of mine living in NY while her husband was taking his master degree says that buying groceries for her usual dinner salad was as expensive as feeding a meal for her family of 3 at any fast food joint. Main problem is knowing what to eat and forcing yourself out of your comfort zone, specially if your income level makes eating virtually the only treat you can give to yourself and your family....and no treat rivals with sweets and greasy food!

    Takes both nutritional knowledge (Today easily available on the web if you do your work) and LOTS of strength of will to change feeding habits for good. In my case both the latter and a tough scare (My problem was the amount of food rather than quality) forced me to drop 50 pounds in 7 weeks during April-May....a gallbladder stone blocked the flow of bile somewhere and caused me a dreadful jaundice that lasted close to 2 months, but after loosing so much body fat (Mostly abdominal) it went through and went back to normal conditions, although had to gave up for good red meat, pork & derivatives, any kind of animal fat, most vegetable fats, sweets, sodas, any food coming out of a box or plastic bag, fried foods, spices and alcohol.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,724 Senior Member
    I like fresh asparagus steamed, not boiled in the water. And baby carrots steamed to tender, not overdone, and allowed to dry on a paper towel are good finger food with some ranch dressing. And I like/love celery with peanut butter or melted cheese in the 'channel'. If celery wasn't meant to be stuffed with something then it wouldn't have that channel the length of it.

    The pork loins are cheap at times in the grocery store, and I buy them on sale. Cooked in a slow cooker to falling apart tender they make a LOT of pulled pork for sandwiches.

    I buy the fresh frozen vegetables that are hard to get at times here in the actual fresh form. Those, A couple of potatoes, and a bit of the tougher cuts of beef cut into small chunks make a great stew in the slow cooker. Chicken noodle soup is easy in a slow cooker, too. Add browned chicken chunks, chopped celery, peas, a little brown rice, and pasta, and a can of chicken stock and let it simmer.

    I like baked fish better than the fried version. And if I buy catfish fillets, it's from a local seller. Channel cat fillets can be bought in 5# and 10# bags and the fish is caught from the Hiwassee River so it's pretty clean. I bake it on a raised mesh grill over a cookie sheet. There is a lot of different pond raised fish where I live now. People can make good money doing that, and the companies that buy it are anal about controlling the conditions of the farms they buy from.

    Those mesh grills are made in different sizes, and I use one that fits in my small cake loaf pans to make meatloaf that isn't soggy on the bottom. Meatloaf sammiches are really good made from that not soggy meatloaf.

    I buy a calf from my neighbor every year for slaughter. I pick one out at around 500# on the hoof, he takes the rest to the sale barn, and I pay him the high average for the calf, in CASH, when it's weighed at the slaughterhouse. No barn fee, feed fee, or other fees taken out of that one, and the local slaughterhouse cuts it to my specifications. We both win on that deal, and I KNOW the calf has been grass fed instead of loaded with corn forced fat.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,802 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    That's only true if you do all of your shopping at some boutique grocery store like "Whole Foods". I can run down to our local grocery store and get a huge pork loin for 15 bucks and have enough lean protein for three or four meals. And a full meal at McDonald's hasn't been $3-4 since the early eighties.


    Oh hell no. I go to Whataburger and/or McDonalds about once aweek. I get a burger and fries with drink. I cannot get out of there alive for less than $10.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,571 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    The Washington Post has a couple of articles that I found interesting. One is mocking Gwyneth Paltrow when she took the Food Stamp Challenge. The other discusses the issue of food deserts-- I can understand where some people may have issues taking advantage of the sales and values I get when your transportation is a subway, city bus, or walking. Living without a deep freezer would put a crimp in my style too, but those cost around the same as a new TV, so that is a matter of priorities.
    Gwyneth....
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/04/17/a-hungry-gwyneth-paltrow-fails-the-food-stamp-challenge-four-days-in/?utm_term=.624dc0fe9084
    Food deserts...
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2015/04/14/what-gwyneth-paltrows-food-stamp-challenge-gets-totally-wrong-about-poverty/?utm_term=.0f0f78a3ff09
    The food stamp thing is mostly bs. You can do it, it just takes some effort and planning and shift in thinking.

    Did not see link to food deserts article. Two articles about stamp challenge, but food deserts are a thing and not just in cities. Cities you have issues with no or difficult transportation and having to carry what you buy on public transit. In rural areas you may have to drive long distances to get to reasonably priced or well stocked stores. In both cases people find a way to manage, but it does make it harder and thus people who are more inclined towards laziness will more often resort to eating junk from the convenience store down on the corner instead.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,802 Senior Member
    It's way cheaper to get fat in this country than eat healthy. You can get 1200 calories of fat and sugar from McDonald's for $3-4 but will cost you at least 2-3x that to get a meal with actual vegetables, lean protein, etc.

    I challenge you to prove you know what you're talking about. Have you ever been to Asia, not Japan or Taiwan but to a poor Asian Country? Or Mexico? There is no comparison. People that far on their ass here get government subsistence. Those outside the country don't. We won't let people starve. True, they won't get Filet Mignon with Potato Souffle and Grilled Asparagus every night, but they won't starve. Most of these people won't eat right if they have enough money. They would rather buy beer and wine with their extra money than meat and veggies.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    Did not see link to food deserts article.
    Skip down to the 4th paragraph...
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2015/04/14/what-gwyneth-paltrows-food-stamp-challenge-gets-totally-wrong-about-poverty/?utm_term=.864e3c45497f
    They were complaining about that in Detroit. The solution? They gave incentives to bring in a Whole Foods in the now revitalized Midtown area.:bang:

    Meijer (a large regional grocer) just built a store on the far north end of the city right on 8 Mile Rd, plus they have had a very nice market district that has been going on for decades. Heck, we make the hour long trip from Flint to go there some times to get the good deals. Then there is a large group of independent Chaldean grocers that have been filling the void to cover most of the rest of the city.

    I understand how it can be an issue, but with some determination, it can be overcome.
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,571 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »

    I understand how it can be an issue, but with some determination, it can be overcome.

    Agreed on both accounts. One of my least favorite parts of the liberal side these days is the victim mentality. Yes food deserts are a problem and create a challenge for some people, and yes identifying and helping to fix the issue is a good thing, but in the meantime it seems it provides cover and an excuse for those too lazy to actually take responsibility for themselves and find viable work arounds for themselves.

    Unfortunately I now see the Republicans picking up on the strategy. Blaming illegal immigrants, China, etc. for all sorts of issues. It seems to be a successful electoral strategy on both sides of the isle these days :-(
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,825 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    [/B]

    Oh hell no. I go to Whataburger and/or McDonalds about once aweek. I get a burger and fries with drink. I cannot get out of there alive for less than $10.

    Double cheeseburger, small fry, large drink....$5.85...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,887 Senior Member
    Do the survey at the top of your MCD's receipt and you get a med fries free.

    SO----2 mac chicken, med fries, 2 drinks
    $4.04
    and the woman feels she was taken out for lunch.

    I rather go to chic-fil-A and get 2 chicken sangs & 2 refillable drinks for $6.19 or so. Don't have one in this town, you'd think with the Base
    here Chic-fil-A would move in.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 9,451 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    While I would argue that the body handles that exactly the same as sugar, I won't. I am going to argue that it is only found in convenience foods. If people actually cooked instead of simply reheating stuff, they could avoid HFCS entirely and the only added sugars in their food would be the ones they add themselves.
    HFCS drove down the price of sweetened drinks like soda where even the poor could afford to drink it on a daily basis

    Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    You do have a point with that. One solution that has been tried for that is a soda tax.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,724 Senior Member
    $1.50 for a bottle of soda, or $2.00+ for a bottle of tasteless filtered water. Which one you think they're gonna buy? :uhm:
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,540 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    $1.50 for a bottle of soda, or $2.00+ for a bottle of tasteless filtered water. Which one you think they're gonna buy? :uhm:

    Years ago I was in St Martin and a bottle of water was $2.00 and a bottle of Heineken was $1.00.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • alphasigmookiealphasigmookie Senior Member Posts: 8,571 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    $1.50 for a bottle of soda, or $2.00+ for a bottle of tasteless filtered water. Which one you think they're gonna buy? :uhm:
    Yep or $5-6 for a 24 pack. Not to mention $0.79 big gulps and free refills at every restaurant. Almost certainly the #1 contributor to obesity.
    "Finding out that you have run out of toilet paper is a good example of lack of preparation, buying 10 years worth is silly"
    -DoctorWho
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,802 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I'll also raise an extended middle finger to those who say "it's not fair, poor people haven't been taught about proper nutrition! "
    you, and the horse you rode in on. We had nutrition information when I was a kid, ALL THROUGH SCHOOL. (Starting 35ish years ago) That info has increased 10 fold, as has the focus on eating healthy. So don't give me the pity party BS. People know what to eat, they choose not to.

    It takes a real Cranial Vegetable to not know about nutrition. But my step daughter's first Husband, a real mental giant, didn't have a clue. All he ate was something sweet. And while they were living here his kids would scream and run around the house like they were high on meth. BECAUSE this liver brain would feed them anything with sugar thinking it would pacify them. All it did was make them hyper, I'm talking to the moon hyper. Now their mother has them with a new man in their life who gives a crap about nutrition and doesn't allow them to eat rocket fuel. They have calmed down 10 fold and this is to say NOTHING about the better health they are experiencing.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,724 Senior Member
    Might be a lot of this ADHD is caused in part by kids wound up like a two dollar watch on sugar. Sugar in everything for breakfast, a soda in the backpack, and candy in the backpack, too.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


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