Old Guns ......New Guns

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  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    That first one you posted looks just exactly like my old Mossberg .410 Shotgun.

    It is the first gun I ever bought & it is a 410 that I got at monkey wards at the age of 9.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,132 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    It is the first gun I ever bought & it is a 410 that I got at monkey wards at the age of 9.

    I got mine at age 10. I turned 70 last Monday.

    Did you ever have problems with your safety on it?

    My dad gave it to me for Christmas 1958 I think.

    BTW, thanks for starting this thread. It's been pretty interesting. Maybe it should be a sticky.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    I got mine at age 10. I turned 70 last Monday.

    Did you ever have problems with your safety on it?

    My dad gave it to me for Christmas 1958 I think.

    BTW, thanks for starting this thread. It's been pretty interesting. Maybe it should be a sticky.

    Never had a problem with it & I took home a lot of squirrels with it. I bought mine on time at wards & paid for it by shining shoes & shoveling snow. I am 66 so that had to be around 1959.
    I don't know forum stuff but figured I would come here & babble on & maybe meet new people that have the same interests & want to share thoughts.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 27,037 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    I was thinking tung oil ....seems like that is not as glossy as true oil is.
    Enough applications of tung oil can end up looking almost like glass once all the pores in the wood are filled using Al's methods. The good news is you get to decide what the end result is by carefull use of steel wool and other fine abrasives. You can go as shinny or as dull as you want.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    I use 0000 wool & up to 1000 paper. For some of my other projects. Thought that might be good for stocks too.
    If it doesn't turn out can always rattle can it & clear the heck out of it.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,777 Senior Member
    I don't like to use steel wool, it tends to pull finish out of the wood and shards can break off and imbed in the wood and will leave little speckles because it will rust! I go as fine as 1000 or 1200 wet/dry. Then rub it down with a cotton pad or cloth dampened with a little finish and some rottenstone. The wiped with a dry cloth. That will make it glow!
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,132 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    I was thinking tung oil ....seems like that is not as glossy as true oil is.

    I like tung oil. I also like boiled linseed oil and True oil. I can do them all. But I prefer the True Oil. It just works.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 27,037 Senior Member
    Big Al1 wrote: »
    I don't like to use steel wool, it tends to pull finish out of the wood and shards can break off and imbed in the wood and will leave little speckles because it will rust! I go as fine as 1000 or 1200 wet/dry. Then rub it down with a cotton pad or cloth dampened with a little finish and some rottenstone. The wiped with a dry cloth. That will make it glow!
    Interesting. I've used steel wool rubbing VERY lightly to just knock the gloss down just a little bit to good effect on a few stocks and then finished with a cloth with some diluted finish on it. I'll try it your way next time.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,777 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Interesting. I've used steel wool rubbing VERY lightly to just knock the gloss down just a little bit to good effect on a few stocks and then finished with a cloth with some diluted finish on it. I'll try it your way next time.

    I've tried about every kind of finish there is. My mentor taught me that method, and he did flawless work, he knew what he was doing. The best looking finish I ever used is Velvit Oil http://www.velvitproducts.com/ That's what Don used, but it did not hold up well in weather. It is best suited for custom show pieces that are not dragged through the woods. That's what I used on my .284 and after the first trip out west with it, the finish was well worn. I re did it with the Permalyn and it's held up since!
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Big Al1 wrote: »
    I don't like to use steel wool, it tends to pull finish out of the wood and shards can break off and imbed in the wood and will leave little speckles because it will rust! I go as fine as 1000 or 1200 wet/dry. Then rub it down with a cotton pad or cloth dampened with a little finish and some rottenstone. The wiped with a dry cloth. That will make it glow!

    I have never used rottenstone Al. Is that like a fine pumice ? With the grips I did I let them dry a day between each coat. Seems like I do that with everything I do. That's why I keep so many projects going at the same time. I just have to watch that I don't kick up dust on other projects while one is drying. Grinding & welding really puts dust in the air.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,777 Senior Member
    Rottenstone is finer than pumice. I just did the final rub down on the JW-15 stock. With the cold or rainy weather, it's been a slow project. I'll start laying out the checkering pattern hopefully next week.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Big Al1 wrote: »
    Rottenstone is finer than pumice. I just did the final rub down on the JW-15 stock. With the cold or rainy weather, it's been a slow project. I'll start laying out the checkering pattern hopefully next week.

    Can that be picked up at the paint stores ?
    I have tore up a whole tree of paper trying to get a pattern that I like & is different.
    How many coats did you put on your stock ?
    Does the amount of coats help or hinder the doing checkering ?
    Do you do 4 or more cuts per line ?
    Crapp I went wild there :uhm:
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,777 Senior Member
    I found it Lowes, but any good paint store should have it. One or two rub downs is all you need, as long as it looks right.
    Does not hinder checkering.
    Since I'm hand spacing, I'll be doing 16 LPI. When I had the electric checkering tool, 22 LPI is a small as I would go. Anything smaller is not practical.
    It also depends on the wood. Harder woods like English walnut will take finer checkering, with Black or Claro, 16-18 LPI.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Heading out soon & will check Lowes on my rounds.
    Quick one ......is curved lines easier or tougher ?
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,777 Senior Member
    Cutting straight lines over a curved surface will cause, among other maladies, sudden onset Tourette's!! I cut up and old steel tape measure to different lengths and use that as my guide around curved surfaces. The steel tape will maintain a straight edge over curved surfaces.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 27,037 Senior Member
    Big Al1 wrote: »
    Cutting straight lines over a curved surface will cause, among other maladies, sudden onset Tourette's!! I cut up and old steel tape measure to different lengths and use that as my guide around curved surfaces. The steel tape will maintain a straight edge over curved surfaces.

    I might eat these words some day but, Lord I WON'T do checkering!!! I tried once and I think a monkey with a dull nail and a rock can do better... It is NOT one of my talents.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,777 Senior Member
    You just raised the bar!!:jester:
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Ska will have to meet that bar because I am one step below a monkey with a nail !
    I went into my room of dreams to get the first attempt at checkering I did. I thought it might make ska feel a lot better about his checkering.......couldn't find it . I may have thrown it in the wood burner. If I come across it I will post a pic of it.It is just a small diamond pattern on dark wood so a photo may not show up well.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Al did you ever shape a laminated stock ?
    I have those 3 sitting but are shaped for bench shooting. I don't do much bench any more so am thinking of taking one & cutting it down & put a Remington 700 22-250 in it. ( I wonder how checkering would look ) My thoughts are that the patterns are so busy you wouldn't see the checkering work .Once I start the finish work on the other two stocks I should have time to play a bit. In between looking for parts & assembly.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 27,037 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    Al did you ever shape a laminated stock ?
    I have those 3 sitting but are shaped for bench shooting. I don't do much bench any more so am thinking of taking one & cutting it down & put a Remington 700 22-250 in it. ( I wonder how checkering would look ) My thoughts are that the patterns are so busy you wouldn't see the checkering work .Once I start the finish work on the other two stocks I should have time to play a bit. In between looking for parts & assembly.
    Laminated stocks are tough because of the stuff they put into the wood under pressure in the process of making the laminate. I don't know that they take classic checkering well. I remember reading somewhere that they clog up the tools. You can probably use alternate ways of adding texture to the wood like a stippling.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    That was my worries. All the glue it must take would play hell with clogging up. The shaping too could be problems with chipping . Really was kind of a brainfart type thing with those stocks. One will most likely be a bench gun but the other two I really didn't know what to do with because I already have the actions that will fit them. It may be belt sander time !
    I just got home from work & these 11 & 12 hour days are a pain. I still haven't found rotten stone but that will be down the line but I do want to try it on a couple stocks. The laminates may be a whole new learning curve on finishing.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,132 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    I was thinking tung oil ....seems like that is not as glossy as true oil is.

    Tung Oil can be very glossy. Both can be regulated to make a great finish.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Do you think tung oil will penetrate the laminate wood like solid wood ? If that stuff is anything like pressure treated wood it will be a mess to work with. By the way Al .....did you get your dock or deck done ? What did you end up using for it ?
    I have seen laminated stocks done & they look nice but usually they look more like wood than a Zebra on a acid trip.
    Oh well at worst more fire wood.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    I look at the gun porn a lot .....hope I don't go blind.
    At any rate I have (in my opinion ) some nice looking guns .....but I also have some clunkers. We used to call the sat. night specials.They are cheap guns & look like crap & wouldn't dream of firing one. Yet I still keep them. I call the odd wall hangers. Now I am thinking of them as practice fixer uppers. They still will be a crap gun but nicer to the eye. Am I alone in this ?
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    I bet this could trim up a stock.


  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Long week working here. May get some time to get back to my projects. If I get supply s & 6 cases of Pepsi. I should be good to get at them again. Pistols seem to be a lot quicker to get a done stamp on than long guns. I think I found a way to get nickel plating off with 12v DC & acid. It looked quick & easy in the video .......bet there will be a nasty smell in the shop.(note to self keep door open & a fan handy )
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Well yesterday was a project bust. To many time consuming things came up. I hope today turns out better in project land.
    I have only a week to get things ready to sell at a flea market. I usually manage to sell 3 or four tubs of gun stuff at those.
    May put a few shotguns in for that this time. Tools seem to go well too. ( thinking out loud here ) I need to do more inventory too but that takes up a lot of time & doesn't feel like I got much done. Seems like sanding & cutting myself is an every day thing here.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 27,037 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    Do you think tung oil will penetrate the laminate wood like solid wood ? If that stuff is anything like pressure treated wood it will be a mess to work with. By the way Al .....did you get your dock or deck done ? What did you end up using for it ?
    I have seen laminated stocks done & they look nice but usually they look more like wood than a Zebra on a acid trip.
    Oh well at worst more fire wood.
    I don't think tung oil penetrates (or anthyng else for that matter) laminated wood stocks. I think you just shape, sand and use spray polyurethane finish and be done.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Sounds easier than solid wood. I have never cut down a stock to shape it so it could go bad real quick.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 2,540 Senior Member
    Working on the older 97 & covered with sawdust. Ready to put the butt plate on so I can fit it. Getting the chisel marks out can be a real time consuming thing Al. This stock has some real small pits in it. I hope those don't look goofy when I sand fill it with sealer. It has an interesting grain to it & is nice watching it coming out better & better. Every so often I moisten it to get a peek at what it will look like .
    Forgot what I was doing & came in the office for a break.
    Came up to get my box of stock wood screws I think a 8x7/8" could do the trick.
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