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Is It Wise Changing CCWs Often?

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  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,192 Senior Member
    My opinion is worth exactly what you may pay for it.

    If you life, or the life of others, depend on your proficency with your EDC firearm, you should be a familiar with said piece of equipment as possible. If you are comfortable changing from one weapon to another, by all means, do so.

    I would stay with similar triggers, mag release, and so on. A Glock is a Glock, as well as M&P, XD, CZ etc. Going from one caliber to the next, or full size v. compact, I doubt would be a huge difference.

    My reason for my opinion.

    Once upon a time,

    I came into pocession of an H&K USPc LEM and a Don Hume thumb break holster. I became quite fond of both of these peices of equipment.

    I did a exceptional amount (especially for me) dry fire practice, drawing from concealment, mag changes, clearing drills, all sorts of manipulation. I also obtained some excellent professional training.

    I found when I changed to a different firearm / holster, I had issues. Return to the H&K/ retention holster, I had issues again.

    Not going for the thumb break automatically, wnich obviously delayed bringing the weapon to bear on my target.

    The USP has a quick or short reset, and I either moved the trigger too far and lost the advantage of that feature, or other things that required actual thought to fire as opposed to autonomously action.

    I made the decision that, should there be a do or die situation, I needed to be as proficient with this system as I could become.

    I cleaned up my other handguns, parked them, and used the H&k for everything for approximately the next five years. After that point, I did shoot some of my other handguns, primarily in controlled, deliberate range time.

    When I had this system on my strong side hip there was never a doubt that should the wolves be at the door, I knew where my weapon was and I would be able to bring it to bear on my intented target as expeditiously as possible.

    A side note,

    During the 12 years that I had this particular firearm, I fired approximately 22,000 rounds (20,000 I can document, quit keeping accurate records after that number), wore out three holsters, (the snaps actually), broke a firing pin, and a hammer strut.





    Sent from my SM-T520 using Tapatalk
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • BAMAAKBAMAAK Senior Member Posts: 4,484 Senior Member
    I don't carry outside the waistband, inside only. But in competition, one of the things I try to concentrate on is getting my grip correct out of the holster. It makes a big difference on the first shot speed and accuracy. Of course that is out of a competition holster which I would think would be easier then a retention holster. That's kind of why I carry IWB.
    "He only earns his freedom and his life Who takes them every day by storm."

    -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German writer and politician
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,802 Senior Member
    Personally, I think that carrying in the same place is more crucial than the mechanics of the handgun. No personal data, but just some anecdotal evidence I've read. So it could be confirmation bias.

    I tend to agree with that to an extent, in combination with what 41 touched on in his post. I tend to see more issues with changing locations and retention styles than the firearm itself.

    I drove trucks with the gear selector on the column for years. My current truck has the shifter on the center console. Know how many times I grabbed for a ghost shifter without thinking about it after I got the new truck? We call it reflexive action, as opposed to “muscle memory.” Personal preference. Happens with any repetitive action we perform enough times. I’m more inclined to keep my carry location and retention style the same and learn to work the tools properly from there.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,788 Senior Member
    41magnut wrote: »
    ...During the 12 years that I had this particular firearm, I fired approximately 22,000 rounds (20,000 I can document, quit keeping accurate records after that number), wore out three holsters, (the snaps actually), broke a firing pin, and a hammer strut.

    I did a little math on that to get a comparison to the way I used to practice. That is about 150 rounds per month, which is probably comparable with what I did for about a year, when I first started carrying concealed.

    So, I calculate that you are now approximately 12 times as good as I am, because I have backslidden horribly since then.
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,192 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    I did a little math on that to get a comparison to the way I used to practice. That is about 150 rounds per month, which is probably comparable with what I did for about a year, when I first started carrying concealed.

    So, I calculate that you are now approximately 12 times as good as I am, because I have backslidden horribly since then.


    I always thought it funny when people would drop their collective jaws when I mentioned that round count.
    Many questioned the fact, even after it was pointed out how this was a relatively small number of rounds fired on a monthly basis.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
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