Winchester .223 Supreme CXP2 ammo for whitetail deer

AntonioAntonio Senior MemberPosts: 2,283 Senior Member
Friend of mine has been invited to hunt next month up north close to the local border with Equador.
Terrain is thick dry brush with no more than 100 yards clearences, most shots being made from hideouts between 50-100 yards tops against the local variant of a tad smallish whitetail deer.

The only rifle he has available for that trip is a scoped bolt-action .223 Kimber Super America and the only available ammo for such job he has been able to find (Other than 55gr. FMJs) are 3 boxes (60 rounds) of Winchester Supreme CXP2s.
He's wondering if the round would be up to the task (He's a good shot and a seasoned small-game & feather hunter so is well aware of the basic requirements for taking a shot) as the factory box states ("For thin skinned game").

Reloading is a no-no, no other .223 hunting rounds are currently availabe and it's already too late for him to do the legal paperwork required to take another rifle from his stash. Any inputs about that particular round and its behavior in hunting situations?

Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    I wouldn't hesitate one second to use it.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,117 Senior Member
    Need more info. 

    Bullet type and weight. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    When I googled it, looked like a 64 gr silver tip.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,224 Senior Member
    That should be their 64gr PowerPoint. if so, I've heard nothing but good things about it for smaller southern whitetails
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,117 Senior Member
    I still want confirmation as to type of ammunition before giving an opinion. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,283 Senior Member
    edited May 14 #7
    Thanks for the replies; boxes say "64gr. Power point plus" and look like FMJs with an open tip (Like the .308 match bullets) covered in a greyish coating.
  • Troy800Troy800 New Member Posts: 19 New Member
    Yep, that will drop a whitetail easily as long as the person pulling the trigger does their job.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,224 Senior Member
    Appears to be a moly coated PP  and POSSIBLY winchester's version of "High Energy" or "Light Magnum" (slightly higher velocity) load.

    And yes, should be a fine load for "smallish whitetail deer"
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,117 Senior Member
    Slay away. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,283 Senior Member
    Cool! Thanks a lot for the inputs.
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,154 Senior Member
    That is exactly the round chosen for SS3's first deer hunt  (goodness was it that long ago? :| )

    As far as Whitetail, I can't give you first hand knowledge, but worked well on Turkey.

    Winchester Power Point has been my 1ST choice in factory hunting ammo for years, and never felt compromised.

    Happy Hunting. 
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,283 Senior Member
    Update: My pal went into this hellish trip (700 miles of poor roads, car broke down, etc.) into the local subtropical dry forest; for three days he tried different spots in a river bed for the small window of time when deer comes down of the hills' brush to drink some water for a couple of minutes and then disappear again, and just when he was about to be picked up by the rest of his hunting party to leave, a 120-ish pounds male popped out of the cover and hid behind some tall weeds to ease its thirst....it was now or never!

    He had already unloaded the rifle to pick up his stuff, seeing only the back of the animal above the vegetation, but enough to risk a shot; had to quietly load 3 rounds in the magazine, close the bolt, aim and fire through cover.
    The animal jumped, ran parallel to the shore for 100 yards and then dove into the forest; took for a while to him and the guide to find its track of blood but finally found it like 100 yards uphill.

    Round does a nasty work; he was aiming to the shoulder area and as he pulled the trigger the deer apparently turned, so the bullet hit above the rear left leg leaving a massive wound with lots of lost blood. Haven't heard the full story (He arrived 4:00 a.m. and had to dump his stuff at home and head straight to his job; called me 6:00 a.m.) but as you guy stated, the cartridge is a perfectly performing round for this type of prey.

    Still need the details of wound channel, if he recovered the bullet, distance, etc. so will be eagerly waiting. This was his 1st. deer ever (Not easy to find them here), and will probably take him a while to go hunting for them again.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    Sounds like less than ideal shot placement with fairly good results.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,283 Senior Member
    Right; he's kicking himself for such a poor hit despite being a very good shooter, but it was either taking the risk or losing the chance since he could already hear his buddies coming down the trail, and that plus the brief moments those animals show themselves in that area forced him to shoot before the deer stood still.
    Maybe the bullet hit the vegetation partially covering the prey and deflected....who knows? Anyway he's quite happy!
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    Hunt long enough and things happen. Would have been worse without his skill.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,077 Senior Member
    This sounds exactly like a bullet deflected by vegetation.  I have had some wild hits on game due to unseen/last light grass and twigs with both archery and firearms shots.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,504 Senior Member
    Six-Gun said:
    This sounds exactly like a bullet deflected by vegetation.  I have had some wild hits on game due to unseen/last light grass and twigs with both archery and firearms shots.
    I agree.   
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,283 Senior Member
    Talked to him yesterday night before he fell asleep, mauled from the 13-hour return drive, the saddleless horseback ride, the 100+ degree heat and all the delicious shenanigans usually enjoyed in the sub-tropics, and he said that despite the 3-9x40mm. scope, he couldn't clearly see the deer's actual position, so he guessed which side he was seeing and took the shot as it was turning towards the hill almost for sure ready to flee as the rest of the hunting party approached.

    Distance was 120 yards from opposing river banks; he said that he could have ventured an open sights shot with his '94 if its paperwork had been issued on time, or any of his surplus military Mausers. Have seen him shooting with irons and think he's right.

    Bullet hit the Hind leg's upper joint and made a mess out of it, tearing skin, flesh and bone in a fist-sized wound; after dressing it they couldn't find any traces of the projectile. 

    As a side note, one of the local guides shot an aadvark the day before (Using a single-shot 20GA rechambered to 16GA....go figure!) and cooked it by smoking the meat in flat strips, sort of a beef jerky; surprisingly for them it was pretty edible, with a little sweet aftertaste.
    Also was surprised when the guides dressed the 2 other deers his pals hunted and left it hanging from a tree branch the whole night (Temperature drops severely to around 45°F or less) but not before rubbing the meat with cooking oil to avoid flies from laying eggs in it during the daytime.
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