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  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited June 2018 #32
    mitdr774 said:
    snake284 said:

    You can take solace in the fact that it's mainly just this forum where the .270 is dispised and some of those dispisers I suspect have owned or own one but don't bring it up here. They'd rather just take shots at those of us brave enough to admit it. They either just keep them in the safe or they hunt with them and call them somethng else when discussing them here. I mean how you gonna know? LOL!
    And why would you change the barrel providing it was in good shape? Try it, you might like it.

    And yeah, I think I would love a .270 Short Mag. It would spit out 150s as fast as my regular .270 will push 130s. Not that you need them for deer, but for Elk or other larger species I think it's definitely a winner.
    I assumed it was some kind of running gag that was mostly aimed at your expense based on casual observation.

    The rifle was purchased as a donor for a project.  It just happened to be a .270 WSM.  I was going to use a Rem 700 as a donor, but finding a Rem 700 in a short magnum is not easy around here.  A Model 70 in a short magnum can be found from time to time, but no where near as cheap as a 700 can be found.  A Model 70 came up and just happened to be a .270.  Dont see too many .300 WSM rifles pop up.
    Of course it's a running gag. I know that. I have a lot of fun on here because of it. I own a .270 Winchester and it has severed me well for 52 years, but I know others that have been served well by their 7x57s, 7-08s, .30-06s, .308s and so forth and so on. But this place can get pretty boring sometimes if we didn't have a joke or two. So when somebody brings it up in a bad light I'm always around to counter the argument. I also own 3 7mms and a bunch of .30s. Hell there ain't no bad one. They're all good and if you look hard enough you can find someting to gripe about any of them or praise any of them.

    I also have a couple of .25s that I love. They are not exactly the darlings of this forum either. I've had about everything. I've had a couple .308s, a couple .30-06s, and more. I enjoy em all.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    About .270 and 7mm-08 and my personal observations:

    Both of these were designed to provide less recoil and flatter trajectory by trimming down a great cartridge. In my experience, with the rifles I have fired them in, the .270 still has almost as much recoil as a 150 grain .30-06. On the other hand, the 7mm-08 has slightly more recoil than a .243, which is about as low recoil as I can get, and still notice it a little bit.

    I have noticed the same thing in .25-06 vs .243. The .25-06 has significant recoil, and the .243 doesn't. My perception is that a .30-06 has more recoil than a .308, but of course I'm not being scientific about it. I haven't factored bullet weight and charge - it is just my perception, and I think a lot of other people have the same perception.


  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited June 2018 #34
    In my opinion the only real gain you get with a .270 over a 7-08 is with the 150 grain bullet. But I don't normally use 150s for deer. The 130 is about perfect for it and most game this side of the Red River. But the same with the .7-08. For what I do, either one is a great choice. And though i've never killed jack with one yet I think the 7x57 is right in there with them.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited June 2018 #35
    While my own .270 Winchester kicks out of proportion to its cartridge, I have shot heavier .270s that had very moderate recoil. Mine just has a very light stock and I shoot max loads in it and it's like being on the business end of a mule's hind foot.
    ,
    But something to consider, since a .270 is rated by SAAMI at 65,000 PSI chamber pressure even factory loads are hotter than the norm. I have noticed in newer reloading manuals some of the loads for it have been toned down. But my load came out of a 45 year old version of the Speer manual and it's full bore. But still the 7-08 is still about as good for deer, at my ranges anyway. The 7-08 is one sweet cartridge.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited June 2018 #36
    bisley said:
    About .270 and 7mm-08 and my personal observations:

    Both of these were designed to provide less recoil and flatter trajectory by trimming down a great cartridge. In my experience, with the rifles I have fired them in, the .270 still has almost as much recoil as a 150 grain .30-06. On the other hand, the 7mm-08 has slightly more recoil than a .243, which is about as low recoil as I can get, and still notice it a little bit.

    I have noticed the same thing in .25-06 vs .243. The .25-06 has significant recoil, and the .243 doesn't. My perception is that a .30-06 has more recoil than a .308, but of course I'm not being scientific about it. I haven't factored bullet weight and charge - it is just my perception, and I think a lot of other people have the same perception.


    I think your perception would pertain more if you're using heavier bullets and full charges of powder. Then no doubt more powder is going to give you more recoil all else being equal. And an 06 is going to hold 8-10 more grains of powder than a .308.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 2,040 Senior Member
    30-06.......versatile, accurate, world wide acceptance and ammo availability. And face it, if a 180 gr bullet isn't enough, than you're hunting dangerous game.

    6.5x55......combines the 243, 260, and 6mm into 1 caliber. And heck, throw in the 25-06.

    264 Winchester Magnum.......smoking hot long range shooter
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 12,197 Senior Member
    7mm-08 by far my go to for deer.  .243 is fun and then there is the .35 Whelen, king of everything.  But I’m really looking forward to taking a deer with the Scooter some day.  So far Teach is the only one to have done so.
    Ah, that answers that.  Need to put the Scooter at the front of the line
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    Not talking science here, but my personal experience of hunting with people shooting deer with .243 is that they kill deer with 100 or 120 grain bullets, with as much (or more) certainty as those of us who have been using .30-06 or .308 with much heavier bullets. My perception is that there is a comfort level from shooting a light recoiling round that relaxes them enough to make more accurate shots. Many people I have known seem to dread sighting in their high velocity .30 calibers, while the .243 shooters are more relaxed, as if plinking with a .22.

    Personally, I have never missed a shot or failed to make a one-shot kill with a .30-06, but I'm not really very sensitive to recoil, and I don't take high risk shots. But, a lot of folks are sensitive, and do not practice enough to overcome that sensitivity. The people I know who shoot .243's seem to always make good shots, so I attribute that to being more relaxed and having more practice. That is really what makes me think that a .243 is such a great hunting round.

    The 'intangibles' involved, when the abilities of average hunters are applied, put the .243 on an even par with any other deer hunting round, in my opinion.
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,720 Senior Member
    I have killed more deer with my .243 than with all of my other calibers combined.  My .270 is next, and like Snake, my .270 is a light weight.  It is a model 1500 Howa with a plastic stock and it will kick the snot out of you.  BTW, I have two .270's, the  Howa and a  #1 Ruger, let the insults begin.  I load 100 grain Nosler Partitions in the .243 and 130 grain  PSP's with max charges of H1000 in each.....robin
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,271 Senior Member
    Top three Deer cartridge.

    1a) 30/06 b) 308W (a&b because I don't have a theaded '06 yet)

    2) 30/30W

    3a) 6MM Rem. b) 6.5 CM (tradition v. Latest and greatest)
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited June 2018 #42
    bisley said:
    Not talking science here, but my personal experience of hunting with people shooting deer with .243 is that they kill deer with 100 or 120 grain bullets, with as much (or more) certainty as those of us who have been using .30-06 or .308 with much heavier bullets. My perception is that there is a comfort level from shooting a light recoiling round that relaxes them enough to make more accurate shots. Many people I have known seem to dread sighting in their high velocity .30 calibers, while the .243 shooters are more relaxed, as if plinking with a .22.

    Personally, I have never missed a shot or failed to make a one-shot kill with a .30-06, but I'm not really very sensitive to recoil, and I don't take high risk shots. But, a lot of folks are sensitive, and do not practice enough to overcome that sensitivity. The people I know who shoot .243's seem to always make good shots, so I attribute that to being more relaxed and having more practice. That is really what makes me think that a .243 is such a great hunting round.

    The 'intangibles' involved, when the abilities of average hunters are applied, put the .243 on an even par with any other deer hunting round, in my opinion.
    The woman on our lease shoots a Model 742 Remington in .243. She misses more dear than the rest of us put together. I think she takes her rifle out and shoots about 5 shots a year and calls it good if she can hit a pie plate 3 times out of five. I want to tell her if she likes a .243 buy herself a nice bolt gun and don't be so cheap. Go buy 4 or 5 boxes of shells and go out and shoot the thing and get accurate with it. No excuse missing deer with a .243.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,985 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    About .270 and 7mm-08 and my personal observations:

    Both of these were designed to provide less recoil and flatter trajectory by trimming down a great cartridge. In my experience, with the rifles I have fired them in, the .270 still has almost as much recoil as a 150 grain .30-06. On the other hand, the 7mm-08 has slightly more recoil than a .243, which is about as low recoil as I can get, and still notice it a little bit.




    I hunt almost exclusively with a 7mm08, but to my untrained shoulder there is no noticeable recoil difference between comparable factory loaded 140gr 7mm08 loads and 150gr .308 Win. loads.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited July 2018 #44
    Maybe it's because I'm pretty substantially built but I have had 2 .308s and neither one has been a hard kicker especially with 150 grain bullets. And they killed with aplomb, whatever aplomb means. Nothing much ran away.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    About .270 and 7mm-08 and my personal observations:

    Both of these were designed to provide less recoil and flatter trajectory by trimming down a great cartridge. In my experience, with the rifles I have fired them in, the .270 still has almost as much recoil as a 150 grain .30-06. On the other hand, the 7mm-08 has slightly more recoil than a .243, which is about as low recoil as I can get, and still notice it a little bit.




    I hunt almost exclusively with a 7mm08, but to my untrained shoulder there is no noticeable recoil difference between comparable factory loaded 140gr 7mm08 loads and 150gr .308 Win. loads.
    I could be wrong about it. I was just stating my personal perception, based on a 7mm-08 shooting 139 grain Hornady hand loads through a Weatherby Vanguard 20" Carbine (basically, just a Howa 1500) and my AR-style 7mm-08 in a Remington R-25, and comparing them to an old Remington pump model (Model 760?) in .270, which is the only .270 that I have shot a lot.. I'm quite sure that the design of the particular rifles makes a difference, so it may not even be reasonable to make such a comparison.

    I haven't owned either a .308 or .270 since the mid-'70's, but I recollect the recoil on the Model 88 Winchester in .308, shooting 165 gr. hand loads was about the same as the push-feed Model 70 in 30-06 that I still own, with a similar hand load. I've fired a lot of 150 grain factory loads that people have given me over the years, through the Model 70.

    Basically, the .308 i used to shoot started to hurt a little bit after 15-20 rounds, but I have fired twice that many from both of the 7mm-08's, without noticing. As I get older, I favor the 7mm-08.

  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,982 Senior Member
    I keep buying new calibers and rifles, but when it comes down to it everything I've killed has been with a .30 cal of some kind, most in magnum form, some short some very long. 
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,982 Senior Member
    snake284 said:
    While my own .270 Winchester kicks out of proportion to its cartridge, I have shot heavier .270s that had very moderate recoil. Mine just has a very light stock and I shoot max loads in it and it's like being on the business end of a mule's hind foot.
    ,
    But something to consider, since a .270 is rated by SAAMI at 65,000 PSI chamber pressure even factory loads are hotter than the norm. I have noticed in newer reloading manuals some of the loads for it have been toned down. But my load came out of a 45 year old version of the Speer manual and it's full bore. But still the 7-08 is still about as good for deer, at my ranges anyway. The 7-08 is one sweet cartridge.
    Mine doesn't kick bad at all, and its likely a good pound lighter than yours. But, stock material and design make a huge difference. And we basically have the same rifle. 

    I didn't want to like my 270, buts it was pretty accurate with cheap factory ammo, and with that MPI stock its a dream to carry all day. My original plan was to have the tube opened up to a more suitable caliber, but the barrel is going to stay .277"......its just the chamber that'll be getting a work out.
  • ojrojr Senior Member Posts: 1,298 Senior Member
    Out of mine I'd vote
    6.5x55
    30 06
    9.3x62
    If I can't hunt it with one  them I got no business shooting at it.
    The flight was uneventful, which is what one wants when one is transporting an Elephant.
     Reuters, Dec 2020.
  • 1hogfan831hogfan83 Member Posts: 347 Member
    I have my Browning A-Bolt 270 WSM but for the the lightweight deer in Arkansas it's heavy even at 130 grains.  I took one at 45 yards at it nearly took the far shoulder off so it's defiantly over kill.  
    25-06 is one I defiantly want, hopefully in a Winchester 70.  
    6.5 Swede in a vintage Mauser is another desire.  
    .257 Weatherby is a distant 3rd if the rounds weren't $50 dollars a piece.  
    "Well he shoulda armed him self" William Munney-Unforgiven"
    "You believe there is one God, that is good, even the demons believe and shudder in fear" James 2:19
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #50
    1hogfan83 said:
    I have my Browning A-Bolt 270 WSM but for the the lightweight deer in Arkansas it's heavy even at 130 grains.  I took one at 45 yards at it nearly took the far shoulder off so it's defiantly over kill.  
    25-06 is one I defiantly want, hopefully in a Winchester 70.  
    6.5 Swede in a vintage Mauser is another desire.  
    .257 Weatherby is a distant 3rd if the rounds weren't $50 dollars a piece.  
    Are you shooting hand loads? Or rather can you hand load it? If so, just bring it down a little to 3,100 FPS. That's the velocity of my .270 Win.  Also, depends on the bullet you're shooting. I shoot regular Sierra Game King 130 grains. They're a bit frangible but hold together on light Texas deer pretty well. If you're shooting something like Nosler Balistic Tips at above 3,200 they can make a mess of a lot of meat if they hit a bone just right, although I have used them and still do in my .250 Savage, .257 Improved, and my .280 Remington.. At least that's been my experience.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #51
    Zee said:

    Next year i plan to use a .50 BMG
    MAN I want to see that!!  Pictures will be mandatory!!!
    Hey Zee will do it too. He killed a doe with a 40 something once. It's not that big a deal. We here shoot white tail all the time with big nasty bullets. I have a buddy that used to deer hunt with his .375 H&H. When I asked him why he used that cannon he just said, "I don't like it when they run away."  I've yet to gut n gill one yet on the hoof. There's always plenty of meat left to eat. I shot a deer with my 9.3x62 with a .270 grain Speer Hot Core and it made about .4 inch hole (that's point 4, not 4 inch)  on the entry and about 1.5 " on exit. That deer fell flat on his belly and never moved a mm frontward or back. He was DRT, with very little meat damage. Big has its advantages.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #52
    1hogfan83 said:
    I have my Browning A-Bolt 270 WSM but for the the lightweight deer in Arkansas it's heavy even at 130 grains.  I took one at 45 yards at it nearly took the far shoulder off so it's defiantly over kill.  
    25-06 is one I defiantly want, hopefully in a Winchester 70.
    6.5 Swede in a vintage Mauser is another desire.  
    .257 Weatherby is a distant 3rd if the rounds weren't $50 dollars a piece.  
    If you hand load the WBY that doesn't apply. I hand load for my .300 WBY Mag, Mark V. The only difference in cost per shot is the extra 10-20 grains of powder. I'm hard headed and use Winchester or Remington Brass('m a cheapo) and for .300 Weatherby the difference in cost of Weatherby Mag brass and say .30-06 is negligible.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ken_S_LaTransKen_S_LaTrans Posts: 108 Member
    44 Remington Magnum 300gr JSP at 1300fps (Handload)...RUGER Redhawk/Super Blackhawk ONLY...Not for Smith & Wesson N Frames.

    30-30 Winchester  

    30-06





    ONLY THE INFERIOR CRY FOR EQUALITY
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    .243 Win. with my dwindling supply of 120 grain Speer RNSP bullets no longer made. .243 has plenty of power for Southern whitetails, and the 120 grain RN expands well.
    6.5x55 Mauser using 140 grain spire SP bullets. The 6.5 is just an easy cartridge to reload for, shoots well, and recoil isn't a problem.
    .30-30 Win. from a Marlin 336 lever gun with no scope. Lots of shots in the woods on my farm are between 35-70 yards, and it works just fine.

    My REAL favorite is my T/C Hawken .50 cal. rifle firing 370 grain T/C maxi balls I cast myself. If I do my part, I don't have deer wandering around after being shot.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Ken_S_LaTransKen_S_LaTrans Posts: 108 Member
    tennmike said:
    .243 Win. with my dwindling supply of 120 grain Speer RNSP bullets no longer made. .243 has plenty of power for Southern whitetails, and the 120 grain RN expands well.
    6.5x55 Mauser using 140 grain spire SP bullets. The 6.5 is just an easy cartridge to reload for, shoots well, and recoil isn't a problem.
    .30-30 Win. from a Marlin 336 lever gun with no scope. Lots of shots in the woods on my farm are between 35-70 yards, and it works just fine.

    My REAL favorite is my T/C Hawken .50 cal. rifle firing 370 grain T/C maxi balls I cast myself. If I do my part, I don't have deer wandering around after being shot.
    I have a 1960s era straight stock 336.  I put on a Williams Peep years ago.  Perfect saddle and deer gun.  Even as "tacticool" as this generation is, it's hard to beat a good lever gun in 30-30 for an all around rifle.
    ONLY THE INFERIOR CRY FOR EQUALITY
  • 1hogfan831hogfan83 Member Posts: 347 Member
    I've never tried at hand loading but maybe in the future. BTW that was a ballistic tip that removed the far shoulder.  At the time I think nosler was the only company making rounds for the 270 short mag.  I'm hoping to go on a hog hunt sometime soon and it would be perfect medicine for a fat piggy!  
    "Well he shoulda armed him self" William Munney-Unforgiven"
    "You believe there is one God, that is good, even the demons believe and shudder in fear" James 2:19
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,410 Senior Member
    I'm coming to a place where I don't really care much so long as round/rifle/scope make an appropriate combination for the area.  The impressive penetration capabilities of the Barnes bullets we're shifting to in the People's Republik have moved my thinking toward shifting down in weight, up in speed, and farther out for a point-blank zero distance.

    So, for deer and deer only, I'd probably go with:

    1.  .280 Remington for the long distance rig.  I'll always take a .30-06 in any "one gun" debate, but again, we're only talking deer.

    2.  Probably .358 Winchester.  My local experience has been that a lot of deer die in the 70-170 yard bracket.  For this, I want shorter, lighter, faster handling, lower powered optics, and yes, I'll take more diameter if it doesn't compromise a point-blank trajectory at those distances on a 6"-8" tall kill zone.  This round would fill the role typically reserved for a .30-30, without the need to apply Tennessee elevation until past what I'd intend to use it for.  My Ruger Scout is a .308. . .possibly because they don't make it in a .358.

    3.  .243 Winchester.  Used to be I considered it a coyote round and the prairie dogger's big stick, with today's bullets, not anymore.  Flat shooting, extremely accurate, and a kid can shoot it.  It's neat in that it can be scoped big for the long shots, but often comes in packages highly appropriate to the type of shooting described in #2.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
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