Winchester 1873, no calibre marking.

das68das68 Posts: 476 Member

A small query.

No calibre markings to be found on a Winchester 1873 carbine, suspected 2nd model, as the serial number is in the 87,000 range.

Was there much of an overlap from the 1st model  to the 2nd model, .44-40 calibre only wise?






History is littered with wars which everybody knew would never happen.

Enoch Powell



 










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Replies

  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,009 Senior Member
    It was only made in .44-40,.38-40, .32-20. and .22. Most popular was .44-40, should be easy to determine.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,266 Senior Member
    You sure that a light trace of a marking isn't visible on the barrel? Maybe shows better if damp/wet?
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 5,727 Senior Member
    Did you look at the bottom of the elevator?
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    I just did a pencil rub on mine & you can see it. But mine can be see with the eye too.
    Mine just has 44 WCF on the top end of the barrel.

  • das68das68 Posts: 476 Member
    If I could show you a photograph (NO PERMISSION, ALLOWED.) , but it is very tired.
    Elk creek said:
    Did you look at the bottom of the elevator?
    It is wiped clean.



    History is littered with wars which everybody knew would never happen.

    Enoch Powell



     










  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    About the only thing left is to measure the bore. Then you will know what it is.
  • das68das68 Posts: 476 Member
    edited July 2018 #8
    Tell you what, even with just a small question, I am very limited in my use of the form.
    I think I may be following alphasigmookie and "Taking a break".





    History is littered with wars which everybody knew would never happen.

    Enoch Powell



     










  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    Just checked & that # was made somewhere form 1920 to 1923 they don't have records of those years to get an exact date of mfr. 1919  ended with 702042
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    I post so much some might wish I would take a break !  lol  Not gonna do it !
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 5,727 Senior Member
    The world has done lost all its patients!
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • das68das68 Posts: 476 Member
    cpj said:
    Don’t be a baby. 

    Diver43 said:
    What took you so long to become a member?

    And you have to ask?



    History is littered with wars which everybody knew would never happen.

    Enoch Powell



     










  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,741 Senior Member
    When you leave stay out of the hot  sun.
    With such thin skin I see your blood boils easily.

    You only have to measure the bore see post #2
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,266 Senior Member
    I think 38wcf/38-40 was more popular than 44wcf/44-40 during the first part of the 20th century???
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,353 Senior Member
    I think 38wcf/38-40 was more popular than 44wcf/44-40 during the first part of the 20th century???
    Because the recoil hurt people who couldn't post photos... 

    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,544 Senior Member
    I considered it too much hassle to post a pic back when it was easier and I stopped when Photoshop went South. I just don't do things that I consider a hassle rather than whine about it and expect sympathy.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 932 Senior Member
    Calibre? British? Canadian?
  • TrueTone911TrueTone911 Senior Member Posts: 6,045 Senior Member
    edited July 2018 #18
    das68 said:
    If I could show you a photograph (NO PERMISSION, ALLOWED.) , but it is very tired.
    Elk creek said:
    Did you look at the bottom of the elevator?
    It is wiped clean.



    I don't think the post count has to come up much to get the training wheels off.
    Head over to the clubhouse and post about the weather, your favorite brand of tires, Pablanos vs Pasillas or whatever.
    This place is worth the wait. These dudes have knowledge you just won't find anywhere else.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,263 Senior Member

    Dust a little graphite powder into the chamber, then poke a wad of tissue paper in just past the chamber and fill it with candle wax.   Once it hardens, tap it out with a cleaning rod.  You'll have an accurate enough chamber casting to make a few measurements and determine which cartridge it's chambered for.  If the casting tries to stick, cry a few of those crocodile tears down the barrel to lubricate it.

    Jerry

    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,487 Senior Member
    OOOOooo Jerry your a real fart smeller!

    I mean smart feller ;)
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,803 Senior Member
    Do as Jerry says, that's all a gun smith would do and it's easy.

    Now if you want to get your post count up just tell everybody you are going to buy a .270 Winchester and you're going to use the "Shoot-Clean-Shoot Clean-Shoot-Clean" Barrel Break in procedure. I guaranty you'll have a thousand posts before tomorrow..... Jus' Sayin'. "Smile"
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • das68das68 Posts: 476 Member
    edited August 2018 #22

    It seems I am.

    For those who may have an interest:






    I don't think the post count has to come up much to get the training wheels off.
    Head over to the clubhouse and post about the weather, your favorite brand of tires, Pablanos vs Pasillas or whatever.
    This place is worth the wait. These dudes have knowledge you just won't find anywhere else.
    Thank you, will do.

    History is littered with wars which everybody knew would never happen.

    Enoch Powell



     










  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    Nice looking rifle there.
    You better get to working some oil in it  to keep the blueing you have. With mine I take the wood off & soak it in oil for a day or so.

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,266 Senior Member
    May not want to remove the wood. Get some oil on that rust and some paste wax. Careful TLC now, determine chambering later.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,544 Senior Member
    Nice carbine and especially nice ladder rear sight. The four calibers that they were made in are different enough to make it pretty easy to determine what yours is. It will be .22, .32, .38, or .44.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • TrueTone911TrueTone911 Senior Member Posts: 6,045 Senior Member
    What would those American Picker dudes call that...Farm Fresh, Rusty Gold
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,266 Senior Member
    I just noticed. There's no screws on that side plate. This dates the rifle as one of the early production one's. Later screws were used to hold them in place as they slid off alot during retrieval from a scabbard. Your 1873 carbine may be quite valuable and careful consideration should be given to any cleaning or restorative procedures.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    I just noticed. There's no screws on that side plate. This dates the rifle as one of the early production one's. Later screws were used to hold them in place as they slid off alot during retrieval from a scabbard. Your 1873 carbine may be quite valuable and careful consideration should be given to any cleaning or restorative procedures.
    The screw is on the left hand side. Mine dates to 1890 & has a screw .
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,266 Senior Member
    Old Ron said:
    O.oearlyagain said:
    I just noticed. There's no screws on that side plate. This dates the rifle as one of the early production one's. Later screws were used to hold them in place as they slid off alot during retrieval from a scabbard. Your 1873 carbine may be quite valuable and careful consideration should be given to any cleaning or restorative procedures.
    The screw is on the left hand side. Mine dates to 1890 & has a screw .
     Well that explains it.
    How'd you reference the date?
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 3,651 Senior Member
    Just go to Winchester mfg.date site & you will know the age of most of them or at least get you close. It goes by model & ser. #
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,266 Senior Member
    That will be good for the OP👍
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