P-dog Shooters, need your advice.

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Replies

  • QuinianQuinian Senior Member Posts: 707 Senior Member
    've shot some .308s that would wear your out pretty fast reguardless of shooting position. The one I have is very nice to shoot. Not much kick at all. I'd say it's about like shooting a standard M16 as far as the kick goes
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,475 Senior Member
    dlk wrote: »
    If that's the case I think you need to change your shooting position.

    A decent day of pdoggin' with a .308 Win will wear you out regardless of shooting position or perceived recoil-insensitivity. I'd even go so far as to say there's no exceptions to the rule.

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,282 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    A decent day of pdoggin' with a .308 Win will wear you out regardless of shooting position or perceived recoil-insensitivity. I'd even go so far as to say there's no exceptions to the rule.

    Mike
    I think he be referring to "wearing your a** out" as a case of needing to "stop clenching," if you know what I mean...and I'm not talking about anything you do with your hands. :tooth:
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,981 Senior Member
    Weight of the rifle and a good brake will make a big difference.
    308 is not my pick for a pd rig.
    I usually will go no higher than a 7mm when doggin
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • QuinianQuinian Senior Member Posts: 707 Senior Member
    Yeah the .308 isn't my first choice either it's just what I had at the time and the land owner wanted some dogs dead. I'll be headed back to his place when it warms up but I think I'll bring the stevens .233 bolt gun someone suggested to me a long time ago. Not sure where you guys are shooting but the ranges I was shooting were no where near the insane stuff you guys are sayin. I didn't have a range finder that day but I'd doubt it if the back end of the field was even 300m out.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,981 Senior Member
    In some places in Colorado and Wyoming you can really stretch your barrel if you want to:jester:
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,516 Senior Member
    The only prairie dog shooting I've done has been with my good buddy Linefinder. To say he's a lot better shot than I am when it comes to hitting small targets at long ranges is a huge understatement. He's the best I've ever seen.

    I have seen him make one kill at nearly 800 yards with his 6mm, and routinely make 400-500 yard kills with his .223.

    As for me, I shoot a .204 and a .222 Remington, and have made just a few kill shots over 400 yards.

    Based on these results, I really don't see any need for anything more than a 6mm/.243, and think that most of one's shooting can easily be accomplished with something in the .204-.223 range. As long as you have a good solid rest to shoot from, a good scope with adjustable target turrets, a come ups table, and a good range finder, you should be ok. There's also a better selection of frangible bullets available for those cartridges, and I have learned that ranchers like it when you tell 'em you load your own. They're not real big on ricochets.

    Now here comes my disclaimer, and it's strictly my opinion.

    Prairie dog shooting is NOT hunting. You hunt for a prairie dog town. Once you find one and secure permission to shoot it, it's a matter of shooting. There is no hunting involved. Taking long shots on prairie dogs is not the same as taking long shots on game animals. If you miss, they either run off and dive into a burrow, or stick around and give you another chance. If you make a good shot, they die. Sometimes they even do a flip for you. If you make a wounding shot, they die more slowly. Sometimes a hawk will get them, and sometimes another prairie dog will eat them. Regardless, it's something I can live with.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,832 Senior Member
    In some places in Colorado and Wyoming you can really stretch your barrel if you want to:jester:

    Yeah, I think Linefinder said once his personal best was around 800 yards. Hell that's half a mile! God he must have good eyes or a strong scope. I don't think I could see a beer can size target at that range even through a 30 power scope.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,981 Senior Member
    I'm pretty sure that Linefinder could go beyond 800 fairly easy if he put his mind to it.
    You can do a whole lot with good glass beyond 800 yards in the 20-25 power range.
    snake284 wrote: »
    Yeah, I think Linefinder said once his personal best was around 800 yards. Hell that's half a mile! God he must have good eyes or a strong scope. I don't think I could see a beer can size target at that range even through a 30 power scope.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,832 Senior Member
    Wow! you think So? That's stretching it out on such a small target, but I know zilch about such shooting so I'll take your word for it. But iffin anybody here's gonna do it it would be Linefinder or you. I wish I had a range to practice such long range shots. I get bored at 100-200 yards. I feel I have a couple of rifles that would work like a charm at much longer range.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,981 Senior Member
    From what Jerry has posted, I don't see that being an issue for him.
    You do need a combination of: good conditions, pd's who will give you multiple opportunities, a shooter and gun that are capable of the task.
    snake284 wrote: »
    Wow! you think So? That's stretching it out on such a small target, but I know zilch about such shooting so I'll take your word for it. But iffin anybody here's gonna do it it would be Linefinder or you. I wish I had a range to practice such long range shots. I get bored at 100-200 yards. I feel I have a couple of rifles that would work like a charm at much longer range.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,475 Senior Member
    From what Jerry has posted, I don't see that being an issue for him.
    You do need a combination of: good conditions, pd's who will give you multiple opportunities, a shooter and gun that are capable of the task.

    And, IMO, the most important part of all........knowing for a fact what the range is. Under most circumstances, PD's are invisible to the naked eye much past 400 yards, so you're "spotting" them through the scope. The magnification and the "f-stop" effect of the optics removes any semblance of stereoscopic (or depth perception) vision, so you'll be relying on other ranging aids.

    Ranging aids can be lasers, of course, but in the terrain I shoot pdogs, they don't consistently return accurate reading against pdogs (or what few available landmarks are in the area) much past 400 yards. My Swedish mortar-ranging scope is good, but it's way too cumbersome to lend itself to quick target ranging. I've even tried putting out fluorescent surveyor flags at 100 yard increments, but past 500 or so yards, it's often difficult to tell if that particular pdog is between the 500 and 600 yard flag, or the 600 and 700 yard flag. No kidding.

    A thousand yard hit on a pdog, in and of itself, isn't something that'd make me go starry-eyed. With the proper equipment and certainty of the range, I think one could reasonably expect a 30% hit rate with a little practice. But watching someone who could consistently call a thousand yards (+/- a little change) in this terrain would make me go starry-eyed. Much as I wish I could do it, I can't and never will be able to.

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,981 Senior Member
    For me, knowing the range or approximate range is a given. So much for assumptions. I agree, I should have mentioned that.:head:
    The places where I shoot dogs at 1K or beyond is such that it is not flat.
    I am shooting from a higher position shooting down, and on one town, the further you go a gradual hill is there, making spotting and ranging much easier.
    When I am shooting dogs, beginning around 1K, I am up on that ridge above the black line.
    The pd in the pic was Sebastian Lambang's (Maker of the SEB, NEO and MAX Coaxial Rests) first 1k+ pd. The day before, was his first ever pd shooting in his life.
    We were not shooting from that ridge that day, because he was working his way out to 1000 yards.
    IMG_2200-1.jpg
    Using good LRF with the topography in your favor helps.
    Swarovski and the new Leica 1600 are great LRF's. There are better LRF's out there, but the price gets steep quickly
    When shooting from the same spot, you also know the distance approximately.
    I have known of some guys setting up some flagging in the town, with different colors for different distance.
    If shooting from fairly level ground, hard to tell (as mentioned above).
    This give approximate distances, plus what the wind is doing at the same time.
    With a good MOA or MIL reticle on the spotting scope or rifle scope you can see the hit and make quick corrections if your LRF goes down or is beyond its capability.
    Most of the time I use a portable bench and a front rest for LR dogging, and can spot my own shot the majority of the time even with my specialty pistols.
    I have taken some dogs at distance using a bi-pod though
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,475 Senior Member
    The kewl factor on a 1K pdog with a hand-cannon is way the heck up there.

    That's some nice terrain for bustin dogs. There's actually stuff to look at. Unfortunately, the highest features in the area I shoot is the center-stripe on the nearest highway it seems like. Once you're beyond the effective range of your laser, it's almost exactly like trying to judge distance over open water.

    It's not unusual for me to have two bushes sort of in line, and I'll get a 327 yard reading on the first but nothing on the second. Judging by the difference in size, I'll make a guess of....say 450 to the second. Then miss every pdog around the second bush, because it was only forty yards beyond the first, but only a third as tall. I've wasted a lot of ammo like that....:bang:

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
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