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Most scared you've ever been, while hunting.

knitepoetknitepoet Senior MemberPosts: 21,641 Senior Member
My particular story is actually quite funny. 

We can ALL use a laugh.

Here's mine

When I was a teen, my dad was a member of a hunting club in west Alabama that was wholly on one familiy's farm. It was old enough, that 80-100 years previously, the head of the family had given a few acres of land to former slaves for a church and cemetery. (Church on one side of the road, cemetery on the other)

Once you crossed the back border of the cemetery, you were back on hunting club property. There was a large white oak tree 50-75 yards behind the cemetery that was dropping acorns, and the deer were all over it. Dad and I decided I would hunt that tree stand, and so he dropped me off in the church parking lot and then drove a mile or so further down the road to where he planned on hunting

It had rained the evening before, and had cooled off enough that "ground fog" had formed. You know, that thin layer of fog, only a foot or two deep that hugs the ground.

I was walking through the cemetery, about in the middle of it, in the dark, in the fog, and I walked into the midst of a covey of Bob White quail.

They decided it was time to go and exploded from all around me.

For those of you that have never experienced a covey rise, they call out as they're taking off. I guess to warn the rest that it's time to go. It's sort of a brrroooo sound, at least that's the best way I can describe it in letters.

Middle of a cemetery, in the dark and fog with numerous brrroooo, brrroooo, brrroooos, rising from the ground all around me.
I BELIEVE if anyone had been watching, they would have seen me running ON TOP of that thin layer of fog back to the road.

I walked the 2 miles back to where dad's travel trailer was parked, and didn't hunt that day. As a matter of fact, I never hunted that stand.

So, funny or scary, let's hear yours too





Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,265 Senior Member
    Thats funny right there.

    I was startled when I woke up from napping to an unexpected visit with local bears.

    I was scared when a freind of my Dads found a dead woman lying in the road one morning. When we investigated the State police told us she was kidnapped by two guys that robbed the gas station and executed there in the road. As a sixteen year old kid I was a bit unnerved in the woods that day.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,189 Senior Member

    I got a mite worried the day I got shot in the leg while pheasant hunting.  24 hours later, including visiting 3 hospitals, 4-5 hours of surgery, flat lining a few times and a flight for life helicopter ride, I woke up and found myself in intensive care.  I got to keep my leg, so I guess it was all ok.

    Believe it or not, it turned out to be a blessing in disguise.

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    I posted this story, in detail, once before, so I'll give the quick and dirty version this time. I'm too stupid to find it with the search function, which I can't even find, sometimes.

    I was 15, and on my first deer hunt, in Colorado. I had gotten very tired, walking the saddles on a pretty good sized mountain, and had sat down on a rock, near an active game trail. I had dozed a little, off and on, and my eyes slammed open when I heard some crunching sounds up the mountain. It was dark-thirty, and I should have already been headed back to camp. But, I was a little bit unnerved, and waited, attempting to get sight of the varmint above me. I saw a flash of dark hair with silver tips about 100 yards up the slope, and my heart jumped up in my throat - Grizzly!

    I waited to see if it was going to move away from me, but soon decided it was coming down the trail toward me. So, I got up and started moving quickly down the steep slope - way too quickly, as it turned out. I had my rifle slung across my back and was attempting to walk quickly, but finally had to break into a run to keep my feet under me. I swear it felt like I was flying, with my feet hitting the ground once every six feet or so. That obviously could not last, and soon I was cartwheeling and somersaulting out of control, finally coming to a sliding stop against some cedar brush, considerably bruised and skint up. I fumbled to get my rifle up, just as the very large silver-tipped porcupine rustled past, oblivious to my presence (or at least unconcerned).

    Unfortunately, my dad and uncle were nearby and saw the whole thing. They ribbed me about it as long as they lived, and I have heard it told so many times, with such outlandish exaggeration that I'm not even sure, myself, if I told it right.
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,951 Senior Member
    I stalked my way into the middle of a heard of elk in the dark.  Having a herd of elk basically stampede around you when it's pitch black dark is pretty spooky.

    I was working my way up the side of a draw where I had been seeing elk early in the morning.  Trying to sneak in there at first light wasn't working, as it was difficult to work up there without them spotting me and running.  So that morning, I decided to sneak in before first light and get to a position where I might have a chance when the sun came up.  I was walking on the opposite side of the draw from where I had been seeing them in the mornings.  The ground was green and grassy, so I was able to work up slowly and quietly.  Apparently, this morning they were on my side of the draw instead of where I thought they'd be.  I got close enough to them and they spooked and the whole herd stampeded around me.  All I could do was crouch down and hope I didn't get run over.  After they ran, I waited for the sun to come up and heard them up the canyon a little ways.  I started working in their direction, when they came over the top of the ridge and started down the canyon right in front of me.  Looked like a herd of about 50 cows and one bull.  I ended up taking a shot at the bull with the Hawken I was using for that muzzleoader hunt.  Adrenaline and poor judgement got the better of me.  I misjudged the range and shot over his back and watched him run away.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    I got treed by a pack of feral dogs when I was squirrel hunting when I was 11 years old. I was hunting a neighbor's property, and had permission to do so from him. He, my Dad, and I hunted quail a lot together. His farm was a bit over 500 acres with only about 150 cleared; the rest was hardwoods and some pine. I was going through some knotty pines when the dogs got after me. I shinnied up one of the pines really quick. They weren't there for head skritches and back rubs, and I KNEW they weren't his dogs, or anyone else's dogs I knew. So I started shooting them, in the head, with my .22. After I'd killed five of them the others took off, but were still in sight, and out of range. I got out of the tree and beat feet to the neighbor's farm buildings, and he just happened to be working there. He didn't live on the place; his wife insisted on a big place in town; she ran a very expensive bridal shop. I told him what happened, and the dogs were in sight as they'd followed me at a distance. He took me home and told my Dad what had happened.

    I found out the next weekend that he'd set out about 3 dozen steel traps and baits, and caught most of the rest of them, and killed them. He came and got me on the next Saturday morning to I.D. the dogs as being part of the pack, and they were. The others must have departed for safer territory as he never saw them again on the place, and neither did I. And you can bet I looked for them when I was squirrel hunting!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,177 Senior Member
    Many years ago when I was bullet proof I used to go hunting possums at night by myself with a spotlight. Didnt have a quad in those days so everything was done by shanks pony ( on foot for those that dont know what shanks pony means)
    Was up the back of our 40 acre block about 2am and slowly working my way back to my Landrover in knee high grass. A fine mist/fog was settling cutting visibility to about 15-20 yds and it was so quiet I could hear the dew drops falling from the trees onto the ground.
    In those days my spotlight rig comprised of an old car spotlight taped to the rifle and a 12v lead/acid car battery in a back pack. Back up was a 2 cell flashlight.....non of the super bright stuff just a small domestic one. I was using a fully suppressed Stirling model 20 semi and had 2 spare 15 shot mags.

    You know the sound a dog makes just before it gets wound up ready to attack? Well I heard a low growl which lasted for about 10-15 seconds and all my hair stood up on end......I quickly turned a 360 looking for the source and didnt see anything. When I heard it growl again I couldnt tell which direction it came from as the sound was echoing from the fog. I knew which direction the vehicle was in so I started slowly heading that way but the noise got louder. so I turned back but no matter which way I went it seemed like I was always walking towards the source.

    At this stage I dont mind admitting I felt the involuntary beginnings of a bowl movement. Unfortunately there were only a few trees around and they were more like shrubs so there was nothing to climb ....

    I kept scanning 360 circles around me and saw a set of eyes off to my left about 25yds away and sent a ,22 between them, ( more by luck than skill) hearing the solid thump of a hit and the eyes went out, but the growling continued. ...I did another 360 and saw another set of eyes off to my right and sent a couple more shots away , again hearing the sound of a good hit....and the growling continued.....By this stage I think there were 2 of me cos I was beside myself with fright.

    Another set of eyes showed up and I shot at them with about half the mag, again with the sound of the bullets connecting............ And still the growling continued.  By now my mind was in overdrive as I figured I had hit something not of this world  and maybe I needed silver plated bullets or a crucifix!!!

    A 4th set of eyes showed up on my left and I emptied the mag at them, hit the mag release dropping it on the ground, rammed home the second mag, hit the bolt release and did another 360...........with the growling now sounding like it was coming from underneath me.

    Then I remembered that where I was on the property, there was a small drain running down the hill and the water had cut a few underground holes.
    I slowly moved downhill to a point where I knew I was on solid ground  and put the light on to where I knew the holes were and saw a much bigger set of eyes staring back at me from about 30yds away.........I emptied the mag so quick it sounded like a machine gun and the growling stopped.... Another quick mag change and everything was quiet.

    I headed back to the Landrover swapped car batteries cos the 1st one was getting weak and finally figured out what had happened ....sort of.

    Waited till first light and went back.

    I found a wild cross breed mongrel bitch had found the perfect place to have her litter in the biggest of the 'tomo's'  and by sheer luck I had managed to avoid falling into her den. I also found that where I had fired at the eyes there were 4 dead 5-6mth old dogs/puppies in a circle around where I had been standing. In the den were 2 more young ones huddled up to her body so I put them down. I also managed to find my 2 mags I had dropped.

    Went up the road to the farmers place that looked after our place and told him what had happened. He said he was going to ring me later that day to tell me that he had been up there the day before and he and his cattle dogs had been bailed up just on dusk  by a large wild male dog. He had shot it with his 12g........but not before it had killed one of his cattle dogs.

    Every time I go back to that spot I get the shivers thinking back about that night.



    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,284 Senior Member
    Not hunting...fishing on Black's Fork of the Green River in Utah...came around a corner in the trail and ran into a cow moose with a calf. She took umbrage with my presence, pinned back her ears and got all bristled up and ran me up an aspen tree and kept me there for the better part of a hour. The calf was just adorable...Mom not so much...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,371 Senior Member
    I was going to ask if fishing counted, but since @Jayhawker wrote his, here it goes.

    I live in South Florida, area is almost totally built out, but any empty land has cattle on it for tax breaks.  I found a small canal that had some nice bass in it,  Had caught 5 or 6 all between 4-7 pounds.  The canal flowed into an open area and I followed it casting as I went.  I noticed some cows on the other side of the canal. They were making all kinds of noise when I noticed one of them was a bull.  Figured all was OK, you stay on that side and I will stay here.  Little did I know that a bull had no problem walking into the water and swimming across.  I starting moving away thinking move slow and don't rile him up.  Wrong answer, he came straight for me and I ran for the fence.  Tossed my fishing pole over it and quickly followed. I could hear him grunting right behind me.  Realized I was  behind a Publix Grocery Store. Had to walk all the way around the neighborhood to get home and was late for dinner.  To this day the wife laughs about me being chased by a little cow and being late for dinner.  Today that field is a middle school and the canal blocked.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • terminator012terminator012 Senior Member Posts: 3,929 Senior Member
    When I was little, maybe 8 to 1o my dad and I went squirrel hunting. It was still pitch black couldn't see your hand in front of your face. Dad set me down under a hickory tree and told me he was going to another one about 100 yards away. Wasn't long before a panther started hollering from behind me. Every time he did it I could tell he was getting closer. I was scared to death. I cocked my old single shot 12 and just sat there. All I knew to do if he touched me was to shoot.His growls got closer and closer. One time he sounded like he was 10 feet away. Finally the growl was past me and I could tell he was moving away from me. I guess out of all my hunting trips that one was the scariest of all. After the sun cane up and we killed a few squirrels dad and I got back together. He asked me if I had heard it. I said heard it, he was 10 feet from me. Dad was over a hill down in a ravine and he said it sounded like it was further away. He said he would have came back if he new it was that close. I said probably a good thing you didn't walk up and touch me about that time. :)
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Another fishing story...My grandfather was gigging flounder one night. That night he found the body of a shrimper washed up in the shallows. The shrimper(s) had been missing for two weeks, so mother nature had their way with the guy my grandpa found. Being a genuine Texan, he told all of us kids the details of his find. Crabs, bloat, etc. Every damn time my dad took me floundering, I was terrified. I avoided floundering for the rest of my childhood. 
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 13,081 Senior Member
    I was sitting in my stand for a couple hours all nice and quiet and I hear a noise above me that I associated with something flying over me but it was very quiet so I was thinking owl, then the sonic booms hit, a couple of F-15's out of the Duluth NG airbase flying at treetop level, the boom rattled me so bad I almost jumped out of the tree stand I was in but I caught a glimpse of the jets as i was getting ready to bail.

    And, not necessarily scared, but, I had a pack of wolves sneak in just behind the tree line by my stand, under 50 yds from me, after i had been rattling and grunting on a buck grunt and they ALL started howling like they were standing under my stand when they figured out it was me and not deer and my hair on my head and neck involuntarily stood up, the base of my brain knew to hit the red alert.  
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,981 Senior Member
    Only been really scared twice, the first was i was fishing with my buddy and ex-wife on the Indian River in Chulitna Alaska, we came around a sharp bend and there was a half eaten fish in the bank, we heard a growl and a grizz stood up and looked at us we unslung our guns and the bear charged only to stop 10' from us , stood up bawling and growling, he dropped down and walked away, it was a false charge. When that bear stood up he was at least 30' tall.

    The second time I was deer hunting in the Blue Hills of Wisconsin with my youngest daughter, she was in her 20s and not hunting, i was just below the ridge and she was about 30' and slightly below me, she started pointing down the hill and i saw a good sized Black Bear walking up the game trail, i told her to be still and i laid on the ground put the crosshairs on his head and said " lord if you ever let me make a shot please do it now" that bear just walked up the game trail looked at her and me and just kept going.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,151 Senior Member
    Hunting moose for the first time in Alaska back in 04 I pulled a bone head move.  I got off my 4-wheeler and was walking on the tundra for the first time.  I was just looking at the most awesome scenery that I've ever seen.  I had my rifle and as I was walking never thought once to chamber a round.  I had walked about a quarter mile and had to pass through what I called elephant grass.  The grasses were like 8' tall. I was going to walk down one ravine and up the other side in this tall grass.  Once in I couldn't see my hand in front of my face and immediately got this overwhelming feeling I could be in be serious danger if there were a grizzly or black bear in there with me.  I stopped took my rifle off my shoulder and chambered a round and had it at the ready position just in case.  I finally cleared the tall grass and about had a stroke.  Two hundred yards away on the other ridge was a grizzly and her cub.   

    I just thought how dumb could I have been!  It was a one and done, never again did I leave the 4-wheeler without my rifle loaded.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,861 Senior Member
    I haven't had time to read the stories yet and will later.

    The only time I have been frightened while hunting was on the Chesapeake Bay duck hunting
    in a row boat. I tied up to my registered blind site with the decoy spread in place.

    After hunting for a bit a big storm moved in with high winds and waves. I was able to get
    the decoys picked up and started to row to shore when I started to be blown out to sea;
    so to speak, I could barely make headway into shore and moved sideways more than I did forward.

    I was getting wet and taking on some water and also worried I might break an oar.

    I guess I was blown a half mile off course and at that moment I entered an area shielded by a bluff.

    The wind lessened then and I was able to reach the shore and then get out and walk in the
    Bay along the shoreline and drag the boat and my gear back to the Naval Research Station
    where I had started out.



  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,871 Senior Member
    Haven't thought about this day in a while. But I was out hunting with my brother, pretty far back from the cabin (Chiro, the spot we went the first morning, west, but we went about 4 miles back. This incident happened though where we walked out by the fence)

    Steve had a problem with his toe he later got surgery on, but he was limping pretty hard. We had gone in a REAL long way and a blizzard hit in the late afternoon. We had finally worked our way out and were coming down the last valley that leads to the gate out of the hills and on to the ranch. It had been snowing real good for about 45 minutes. As we came past a stock pond I noticed cat tracks on the trail we were walking out. Obviously VERY fresh. I was about 20 yards in front of my brother and it was fading light pretty fast. I came around a big bend and noticed the tracks just STOPPED. Cat had jumped into some trees or the boulders, and I couldn't see where it ever set foot on terra firma again. I stopped and looked around and just got the feeling I was being watched. I pulled my rifle off my shoulder and racked a round in the chamber keeping an eye out for any movement or twitch. Steve was finally catching up and asked why I had chambered a round. I just said in case we see any last light movement. A target limping behind me and a hungry cat somewhere in the trees above me put me on full alert. I slowed way down and made sure he was never more than 10 yards behind me, but the whole time I KNEW something was watching me. That primal fear and neck hair is pretty ingrained in us I imagine. I didn't tell him what was going on until we had cleared the gate and were far enough from any cover that I felt we were totally safe. I never saw it, but I knew that damn kitty was watching us and probably figuring if we'd make an easy meal. 
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 13,081 Senior Member
    Dang, that cat was very close to civilization
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,496 Senior Member
    The scene: 

    I'm about 10-11 years old, still living in Illinois, walking at dusk along a trail in a national forest that had been bush-hogged out by the local running club for their cross country race.  Carrying my little 10-pump Crossman pellet rifle for the purpose of sniping starlings.

    The trail had been pretty well maintained so the edges of it had grown sufficiently thick that you really couldn't see too deeply off the trail.  Suddenly, from behind that impenetrable cover comes a very loud "SNORT!" from some creature with a very cavernous chest.  In retrospect, it was almost certainly a whitetail deer sounding an alarm, but this was about the time I had read Old Yeller, and its passages of the damage a feral hog can do to an unprotected leg were fresh in my mind.

    As I recall, there was some backing down the trail away from the source of the noise before performing a 180 and evacuating with due haste.  The creature that I pictured in my mind was NOT a problem that would have been solved by a .177" pellet at 600 fps!   EEEEEEEEEEEE!
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    I've never been really scared while hunting except a time or two when a coyote let out a yelp close by. If you're not ready for that it can be blood curling and cause you to need an underwear change. But that's usually more funny than serious. However, once when I was about 18 I was on a Boy Scout hunt on the Welder Ranch about twenty miles away and it was about end of shooting time, shadows real long and we were looking for a deer another kid shot at. We .Wwere in the Guadalupe River Bottom. I was walking along a fence and looked down in the dark and could see two snakes by my feet. They were poisonous I could tell by the shape of their heads. I didn't know if they were Cotton Mouths or Copper Heads but don't believe they were rattlers because they made no sound and didn't look like there were rattles on their tails. Something about a rattle snake you can damn near see in the dark. I know one thing, they didn't have my best interest at heart. I could barely make out their outline and movement in the near dark. I tell you, you don't know what kind of physical movement you're capable of until the need arises. But afterwards one of the chaperones later told me I looked like I was tight rope walking that fence. Whatever, I know I was damn near air born. I went down the fence about 20 feet I guess before I jumped off onto a path and made my way up the hill to the road and to the jeep I had come in. I've had other reptile encounters while hunting but that's about the closest I've been to actual harm.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 2,122 Senior Member
    I have had numerous run-ins with snakes during my years in West Africa as a teenager.  One day my brother and I were hunting along a jungle stream, I was in the lead with my brother a few steps behind me.  I stepped on a root.....but then the "root" started to wiggle.  I stumbled forward and turned just in time to see my brother yell "Snake!" and swing the barrel of his gun downward and sideways, slapping either a black cobra or a black mamba (same difference, mambas are just hoodless cobras) that was hanging on my pants leg off into the brush.  We then turned and ran back the way we came, knowing that snakes in the cobra family are often territorial (mambas especially).  I ran so fast I literally ran right out of one of my shoes.  :D  We then had to go back...... that shoe was brand new and I was more willing to face that snake again than to face my mother after having lost one of my new shoes.

    Another time I was hunting with a friend and again was in the lead.  I stepped up on a log, then stepped down to the ground on the other side and kept walking.  Hearing a noise behind me, I turned and saw my friend standing on the log, looking down at a large Gaboon Viper that I had stepped across without seeing.  My trusty 12 gauge quickly dispatched him.

    Another time I was out hunting with my other brother, this time he was in the lead.  A black cobra charged him from around a stump alongside the trail.  My brother had his cutlass (like a machete, but heavier) in his hand so he instinctively chopped down and cut the snake in half.  The front half escaped into the brush.....the back half was over 3 ft. long.

    Last story and probably had me the most scared.  My brother (the snake chopper, not the snake slapper) :D and I were hunting at night with single shot shotguns with flashlights strapped to our heads.  He had a 12 gauge, I had a 410.  We had to ford a small river and then about 200 yards further, we suddenly heard a very loud call of some type of animal.  We had never heard that before in the 4 years we had been in Africa at that point and it was really creepy.  It sounded like a combination of an angry bull and a chainsaw.  We looked at each other rather concerned because it was coming from behind us right about where we had just forded the the river........and sooner or later we were going to have to go back that way and ford the river again.  We were guessing maybe a crocodile, but didn't know.  We were extremely cautious fording the river again, but never did see anything.  We talked about that incident for years afterwords.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #21
    I have had numerous run-ins with snakes during my years in West Africa as a teenager.  One day my brother and I were hunting along a jungle stream, I was in the lead with my brother a few steps behind me.  I stepped on a root.....but then the "root" started to wiggle.  I stumbled forward and turned just in time to see my brother yell "Snake!" and swing the barrel of his gun downward and sideways, slapping either a black cobra or a black mamba (same difference, mambas are just hoodless cobras) that was hanging on my pants leg off into the brush.  We then turned and ran back the way we came, knowing that snakes in the cobra family are often territorial (mambas especially).  I ran so fast I literally ran right out of one of my shoes.  :D  We then had to go back...... that shoe was brand new and I was more willing to face that snake again than to face my mother after having lost one of my new shoes.

    Another time I was hunting with a friend and again was in the lead.  I stepped up on a log, then stepped down to the ground on the other side and kept walking.  Hearing a noise behind me, I turned and saw my friend standing on the log, looking down at a large Gaboon Viper that I had stepped across without seeing.  My trusty 12 gauge quickly dispatched him.

    Another time I was out hunting with my other brother, this time he was in the lead.  A black cobra charged him from around a stump alongside the trail.  My brother had his cutlass (like a machete, but heavier) in his hand so he instinctively chopped down and cut the snake in half.  The front half escaped into the brush.....the back half was over 3 ft. long.

    Last story and probably had me the most scared.  My brother (the snake chopper, not the snake slapper) :D and I were hunting at night with single shot shotguns with flashlights strapped to our heads.  He had a 12 gauge, I had a 410.  We had to ford a small river and then about 200 yards further, we suddenly heard a very loud call of some type of animal.  We had never heard that before in the 4 years we had been in Africa at that point and it was really creepy.  It sounded like a combination of an angry bull and a chainsaw.  We looked at each other rather concerned because it was coming from behind us right about where we had just forded the the river........and sooner or later we were going to have to go back that way and ford the river again.  We were guessing maybe a crocodile, but didn't know.  We were extremely cautious fording the river again, but never did see anything.  We talked about that incident for years afterwords.
    Brother Canyon, you win, no contest. Nobody on here, in my opinion, has been in peril while hunting like you. A Black Mamba was referred to by Steve Irwin, the Aussie Wildlife expert, who died from a sting ray barb to the heart, referred to the Black Mamba as "The Great White of Snakes !" Also, just about any poisonous snake in Africa trumps anything we call poisonous here. In fact, the Gaboon Viper is damn near as dangerous as a Mamba. There's more venomous snakes than a Mamba but not a whole lot. Plus the Mamba is very aggressive and the fastest of snakes. All that and there were lots of 4 legged species there that could kill you if confronted. You lived among some very dangerous species. Congrats on your survival.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 2,122 Senior Member
    Did I mention almost stepping on a couple of green mambas a couple of times?  Pretty much the same snake as a black mamba (including venom and attitude) but a pretty pale green color which transitioned to tan and then brown on the tail (yep, came close enough for a positive ID too many times).  The Gaboon Viper is very lethal if it bites you (holds the world record for the longest fangs in a snake) but fortunately they are very slow (they crawl in a straight line like a caterpillar) and they are not aggressive at all.  They are ambush predators and masters of camouflage.  I cringe to think how many I must have come close to stepping on without ever seeing them.  A 4 ft. long Gaboon Viper will have about the same girth as a large python but can be all but impossible to see on the jungle floor even 2 ft. away.  A friend of mine was night hunting and stopped to look around.  Hearing a noise at his feet he looked down and realized he was straddling a Gaboon Viper that was swinging its head back and forth between his feet.  The snake was not aggressive though and made no attempt to bite him.  We used to joke that the Gaboon Viper was not dangerous because of the extremely long fangs......if it bit you the fangs would go all the way through your leg and squirt the poison out the other side.  :D  (That was my dad's joke, I can't take credit for it.)  The venom of the cobra/mamba family affected the nervous system and would often be fatal before the victim could get to the closest place that would be able to treat it.  The Gaboon Viper venom was a blood thinner.  It would inject such a large quantity of anti-coagulants that if a victim could not get treatment in time they would actually bleed to death.  Here in North America the majority of snakes are non-venomous.  Where I lived in Africa (Liberia) the majority of snakes we ran across were venomous, so our policy was to identify them after application of the appropriate treatment from the business end of a 12 gauge.  I returned the last time from Africa in 1988 but even with all the close calls I had I would go back in a heartbeat given the chance.
  • Ken_S_LaTransKen_S_LaTrans Posts: 108 Member
    The most scared...actually the only time I was truly ever scared...while hunting was in 2014.  My oldest son and I were on an antelope hunt in southern Arizona.  We trailered our horses to the ranch of an old family friend in Sonoitam AZ, and packed out from there.  The area we were hunting was roughly 15 sue miles through the mountains to a plain between Sonoita, Patagoinia, and Canelo.  There aren't even old mining roads through there, so it is horses or hiking...and I grew up on horses ridiculing hikers.

    Anyway, I was on my steady old paint gelding Two Step and my son was riding his QH Amigo...both of them are rock steady trail horses with no bad habits to mention.  My friend Red was riding his Old Man and all was good.  My son Matty was taking his turn ponying the pack mule, bringing up the rear. 

    For some reason the mule boogered and started to buck on the trail which was only about 3 feet wide with mountain to the right, and nothing much but 60 feet of drop off to the left.  It was the most and only real treacherous spot on the whole trail.  The mule chose that one to booger and he yanked my son right off Amigo and my son went over the side.  I was off Two Step and had my rope in hand thinking that I was going to have to go down over the side to collect my son's broken body.

    Thank God, and I mean thank the Good Lord...Matty was only down about five feet holding onto a root.  I got the rope around him and dallied it off to my saddle. Red and I guided the rope, with Two Step backing up and pulling him up to us.

    The only thing damaged was his pride and a pair of sunglasses.

    I have never been so scared in my life...even when on a dope house or felony warrant entry when bullets were coming in my direction.  Losing one of my kids is my worst nightmare, I mean I can't think of anything worse.  I'd gladly step in front of a bus for my kids, or take a bullet, or donate my beating heart if they needed it.

    No...I didn't shoot the mule when we finally got the SOB back...but I am not saying I didn't think about it.
    ONLY THE INFERIOR CRY FOR EQUALITY
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    In my late 30’s I was once squirrel hunting a new state park that id never hunted before, by myself. All I had with me was my cellphone, shotgun and carhart jeans with pockets filled with shells. Before leaving my truck I had noted my gps location and direction via the compass that’s built into my phone. That season turned out to be pretty terrible hunting as there was a bad drought that year and not a squirrel in sight but I had trailed a few good miles deep into the woods when I decided it was time to head back to the truck since the sun was starting to go down. I pulled out my phone to look at my gps/compass to determine my path back to find that it wouldn’t acquire a signal. I was screwed. It was then that I realized just how ill prepared I was. I tried to keep calm but there’s always that panic feeling and dreadful worry of how the hell is this gonna turn out for me. After going in circles and wondering aimlessly for probably about an hour, I started to see something in the distance that relieved my fears. It was a small, old abandoned water tower that was near the trail that I knew led to my truck. I was finally safe then and made it back just in time because had 15 more minutes gone by I wouldn’t have had light enough to have seen that tower. I also learned that the moss on the north side of the tree and all of that is a load of horse ****.
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