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Anyone know anything about hatchets?

breamfisherbreamfisher Senior MemberLiving in a van, down by the river.Posts: 14,032 Senior Member
This was my Dad's, who passed several years ago. I know no details, just know we have had it a while. Long enough to replace the handle.
Wondering what the spike is for....

I'm just here for snark.

Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Maybe for fighting fires?
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,280 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #3
    I have seen similar that Officers and "Truckees" carried in the Fire Service in some departments back in the day...sort of a small version of the Fire or Pickhead axe...
    I used to carry a small halligan tool...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member VirginiaPosts: 8,337 Senior Member
    We had a few of those when I was a young volunteer FF.  They just called them “entry tools”.
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Living in a van, down by the river.Posts: 14,032 Senior Member
    cpj said:
    If it ain’t sharp, it’s useless. ;-)
    That's some good advice...
    I'm just here for snark.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Central MNPosts: 14,659 Senior Member
    You could repel boarders in front of you and behind you without changing your grip.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    You could always bury it.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
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  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Living in a van, down by the river.Posts: 14,032 Senior Member
    You could always bury it.
    In whose skull?
    I'm just here for snark.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member In the sticks, OHPosts: 5,617 Senior Member
    Look for small stamps, proof marks,  etc.  Dont sharpen with a power tool, it messes up the temper.
    Much like old guns, the value in old axes and hatchets is in the patina, and original condition 
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Pensacola, FLPosts: 10,826 Senior Member
    Google Mattock.  It’s a tool with an axe blade on one side of the head and a adze or pick on the other used to aid in digging holes.
    A mattock has a horizontal blade for digging. A pickaxe is also for digging. That is a fire axe....

     nbb 
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Under a logPosts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Well, whatever you call it, the full growed version of that the same weight and length as an axe was what was and is called a 'grubbing axe' in these parts. In use the blade is used to cut tree roots, and the pick point is used to dig up/pry up the roots for removal. Also, when digging a ditch/drain line by hand, they come in right handy for removing any deep tree roots that you encounter while digging. They beat the devil out of a mattock for that job.
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  • ojrojr Senior Member New ZealandPosts: 1,341 Senior Member
    The ones your talking about tenmike we call a Grubber way over here as well.
    Don't see so many about now but when I was a kid every household had one in the shed.
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  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Under a logPosts: 27,457 Senior Member
    ojr said:
    The ones your talking about tenmike we call a Grubber way over here as well.
    Don't see so many about now but when I was a kid every household had one in the shed.
    I guess you and I don't see so many now is because people will hire stuff done rather than do it themselves anymore. I can't even begin to count the times I ended up on my backside pulling up roots cut with one of those things! :D  You'd be straining your guts out trying to get that root to move, and all of a sudden it would release and over you'd go. 

    I learned how to use a draw knife peeling bark of black locust fence posts when I was still in single digits age. My Dad showed me how to hold it and do one post, and then left me with a stack of posts that had to have been around 250 that needed skinnin'. At least I could work in the shade! The fence I helped build nearly 50 years ago still has a lot of those same posts in the fence row. Those things seem to last forever on high well drained ground.
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  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    This was my Dad's, who passed several years ago. I know no details, just know we have had it a while. Long enough to replace the handle.
    Wondering what the spike is for....

    Looks almost like a full grown axe. I've used the spike end for everything from busting up a stump to digging and busting up the ground. They're pretty useful.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
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  • hawk18hawk18 Senior Member OrygunPosts: 742 Senior Member
    Google "naval boarding axe". I doubt that that's what it is but it's more romantic than "fire demolition tool". 

    Hawk
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Miami, FL almost in the USA ;)Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    Design looks like the back is used for digging or leveraging in a crack like a door.  Would not be unusual in that time frame for a smith to have made it as a one off.  If the “pick” end is sharp you could also scrape narrow areas creating tinder for a fire.  Imagination is endless.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
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