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Cougar attack

hawk18hawk18 Posts: 742 Senior Member

http://www.kdrv.com/content/news/Sheriff-Oregon-Hiker-Likely-Killed-by-Cougar-492997141.html

It looks like we may have our first ever human killed by a cougar. However, no autopsy yet so she might have been dead before the cougar arrived. 

Hawk


Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    A good reason to be armed, even if its a post mortem event.
  • NNNN Posts: 25,200 Senior Member
    Better reason to increase hunting of the critters.
  • SpkSpk Posts: 4,767 Senior Member
    We've had 3 fatal attacks in California and even more non-fatal encounters.

    "A mountain lion’s killing of a bicyclist Saturday in Washington has brought renewed attention to the rare attacks by an animal usually averse to engaging with humans.

    Of six fatal attacks by lions in the United States in the past 25 years, three have been in California. The others, in addition to the Washington attack, were in Colorado and New Mexico.

    Before 1994, there had been only one California mountain lion attack in the 20th century that caused deaths — a 1909 incident near Morgan Hill."

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/05/22/killed-by-mountain-lions-details-of-california-attacks/
    That's why I carry, especially when I'm up there stomping around. You never know.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Apparently a confirmed attack now. 
  • BigDanSBigDanS Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    edited September 2018 #6
    Our backyard.  Lots of speculation as to what happened but I have been talking to locals and have some theories. She was hiking alone, and her backpack was found unmolested 2 miles down a trail on Mt Hood.  Her body fell off a cliff over 200 ft down.  My theory is she stopped to relieve herself, took off her pack on the trail, and was attacked while squatting.  In an effort to escape the cat she chose to cliff jump hoping to survive, and died from either the fall immediately or over time from both her fall and attack injuries.

    Cougar and bear hunting with dogs was outlawed in 1994 in Oregon and since Cats live 8-13 years, none are alive that have been hunted and those alive today have not learned to fear man.  The official estimate in 2015 by the fish and game department is 6000 total cougars in Oregon, but most outdoorsman believe that number to more likely 12,000 or more.  

    Currently they are trying to hunt that cat down with dogs, will kill it and then check its DNA to see if it is a match.  We will know more when and if they release the autopsy.

    My wife hikes alone and is hesitant to carry a gun, but I think I have at least convinced her to start carrying a larger fixed blade knife.  While it is not a concensus among NW outdoorsman I have been chatting with, many feel there are too many predators at this time and they need a cull.

    One attack in 150 years is not a trend and it may just be an anomaly.

    Certainly more to come...
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • terminator012terminator012 Posts: 3,930 Senior Member
    Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency reported there has been 9 confirmed different sightings of them here.
  • NCFUBARNCFUBAR Posts: 4,324 Senior Member
    I’m not to familiar with how a cougar attacks ... you most likely hear and then see black bear before they get to you but are cougars surprise ambush mostly or what? Depending on how they do I’d be rethinking my carry style if I were in that neck of the woods ... I’m not a big open carry but for ease and quickness I’d sure be rethinking it.
    “The further a society drifts from truth ... the more it will hate those who speak it."
    - George Orwell
  • BigDanSBigDanS Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    I have thought a lot about this.  I think weak side carry would be more appropriate, as your strong hand might be busy fending off an attack.  For me, left side draw, knife mounted on my right pack strap handle down.  A 7 inch blade  ka-bar would be just right
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • terminator012terminator012 Posts: 3,930 Senior Member
    I saw one cross the road from beside my house a few years back. He walked across the open field in front of my house and disappeared into the woods. Local game wardens at the time told me I was crazy but looking on Google confirmed what I saw. I always think about my dad messing around in the woods at his house on and off his 4 wheeler. I don't know how they attack but if they jumped off a low limb and landed on you and you didn't have quick access to a pistol or a good knife, I'd say you didn't have much chance.
  • rberglofrberglof Posts: 2,970 Senior Member
    When I was in California and was walking in the desert or mountains I carried my 44 special with me always, The Tehachapi mountains and surrounding area has lots of mountain lions.
    We have some in North Dakota but also a season on them unlike California
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Posts: 18,226 Senior Member
    NCFUBAR said:
    I’m not to familiar with how a cougar attacks ... you most likely hear and then see black bear before they get to you but are cougars surprise ambush mostly or what? Depending on how they do I’d be rethinking my carry style if I were in that neck of the woods ... I’m not a big open carry but for ease and quickness I’d sure be rethinking it.
    Cougars are ambush predators....a number of folks have been attacked from behind while bicycling or hiking creating a situation where the cat percieved their prey was fleeing.
    An acquaintance in Colorado was surprised by a cougar while calling coyotes...his son called his attention to the cat stalking up behind them.   After that he always made sure he had a rock face or large tree at his back when calling....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    What Jayhawker said; cougars are ambush predators that attack from behind, and go for the neck. They, and other similar sized cats, seem to try to get their teeth in the throat and clamp down and strangle their prey.

    Terminator, there are several sightings of cougars over here in East TN, too. Good place for them as there is a LOT of wooded land with no people in the National Forests and state owned forests and parks.

    People in India a few years ago that regularly go into the forests for whatever reason started wearing masks on the back of their heads to help ward off tiger attacks. It seemed to have helped.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • tennmiketennmike Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Thinking about it, if I lived where there were a good number of cougars around, I'd have a couple of good redbone or bluetick hounds with me at all times. They have great noses and good eyes, and would let ya know if something is around. And both love a good chase.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • SpkSpk Posts: 4,767 Senior Member
    edited September 2018 #16
    tennmike said:
    What Jayhawker said; cougars are ambush predators that attack from behind, and go for the neck. They, and other similar sized cats, seem to try to get their teeth in the throat and clamp down and strangle their prey.

    ...

    People in India a few years ago that regularly go into the forests for whatever reason started wearing masks on the back of their heads to help ward off tiger attacks. It seemed to have helped.
    This!

    If you're up in the hills walking or hiking, look up the slopes or at elevated position from time to time. They'll stalk you from a vantage point (good eyesight) and later attack you from behind.
    If the area is mostly flat, be wary of grassy areas where they'll lie flat and wait for you to pass by and then attack from behind.
    If they can't get to the back of your neck, they'll attack the throat and suffocate you.
    If you suspect a big cat in the immediate area and you're not actually hunting a cougar. Leave and keep a 360 degree lookout -- bear spray is better than nothing if you don't have a gun.
    Here's some cougar facts:
    https://wildsafebc.com/cougar/

    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • 104RFAST104RFAST Posts: 1,281 Senior Member
    OH, that Cougar!!
  • SpkSpk Posts: 4,767 Senior Member
    Because I look so young, I have be the victim of one or two cougar attacks...
    It was nickle beer night and the cougars were calling you "Chum".
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • BigDanSBigDanS Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    They killed a cat yesterday and are examining it and attempting a dna match.
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • BigslugBigslug Posts: 9,615 Senior Member
    Pondering from an animal behavior viewpoint. . .

    I'd be curious to what degree mountain lions follow the common "man eater" patterns of their big Asian and African cousins - the whole sick and injured thing -  or if human victims of cougar attacks are more often simply targets of opportunity or errors in prey identification by healthy animals.  Cougars eat deer.  People are roughly deer-sized.  Cats instinctively bounce prey-sized stuff that moves.  North American humans seem to be pretty good at terminating first-time offenders, so there aren't any Patterson / Corbett style stories of habitual mountain lion man eaters that I'm aware of.  I've got to wonder how many people killed by cougars are actually eaten, or if it's more often a case of "Oops!  Sorry!  Thought you were Bambi. . . and you smell and taste TERRIBLE!  Won't happen again".  Wiki at least isn't all that clear on the gruesome details, but according to California DFW stats,  only 3 of the of the 14 attacks since 1986 were fatal, and all of the five of little kids attacked were among the non-fatals when they should have been easy, quick kills if the cat was serious.  The DFW page also mentions a "non-attack" where the cat aborted the approach when it realized the "prey" it was stalking was a turkey-calling hunter who was camouflaged to the nines.  It also briefly mentions four fatalities among six victims over a hundred years ago - doesn't say whether they were killed and snacked on or died of infection in a pre-antibiotic age. 

    I hunt deer in an area where I have seen evidence of mountain lions doing the same thing I am.  If I go out rasslin' with one (or a black bear), I won't take it personally.  I'm no starry-eyed, bunny-hugging PETA freak - - I have no problems snuffing a confirmed man-eater, but I have to wonder about the efficacy/sense of killing a carnivore for having followed it's instincts on it's own turf; and I frequently roll my eyes at the outcry/policy to "DO SOMETHING" when such things happen.  If you walk in the woods, you might get to play Darwin Roulette with the things that live in them.  If you want a "safe" nature walk, maybe you should take your chances with the drug dealers in the local park instead. For my part, I'll be thankful for the spooky creatures keeping you scared and out of "my" National Forest.  Just sayin'.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Many years ago I made a high altitude back pack camp just below timberline. Earlier in the day I had crossed fresh cat tracks. I woke up predawn to answer the call of relief. Upon return to my bed, a low pitched growl pierced the darkness close by. I was well armed, but my flashlight was beyond reach and it was overcast black ink dark. I waited to be jumped on hoping to have a sure shot afterward as I was sightless. Never happened. In retrospect I think it was a lynx or bobcat.

    Would it have ended differently with a cougar? For all I know it was a cougar. 

    Just like life in general, we take it as it comes, try to stay calm and do the best we can. I think I was safer that night than I am driving home at night from work.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Posts: 7,800 Senior Member
    All I know about cougars is that their front paws are bigger than your face. I like them on the other side of the wire, though.
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    Anybody that’s watched a house cat hunt and kill a mouse can envision how damn terrifying it would be to have a 150lb+ cat stalk and attack you. I’m a dog person for a reason.
  • rberglofrberglof Posts: 2,970 Senior Member
    Have friends in Tehachapi that had the wife's elderly mother living with them. They saw her calling to an animal at the back patio door trying to get it to come in. Jo walks to the door and there is a mountain lion standing there looking at her mother. She said she was just trying to get the cat to come in.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    Reports are that she had a sharp object to defend herself and a walking stick and she put up a fight.  That's how they think they can match DNA.  Now that they have a cat it will be interesting to see what's what.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    edited September 2018 #26
    Teen kills a Cougar with her bow who was stalking her little brother, good for her. Saw this on the news this morn and giggled the story.



    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,908 Senior Member
    Big Chief said:
    Teen kills a Cougar with her bow who was stalking her little brother, good for her. Saw this on the news this morn and giggled the story.



    That girl has got some skills.
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • sgtrock21sgtrock21 Posts: 1,933 Senior Member
    Bigslug said:
    Pondering from an animal behavior viewpoint. . .

    I'd be curious to what degree mountain lions follow the common "man eater" patterns of their big Asian and African cousins - the whole sick and injured thing -  or if human victims of cougar attacks are more often simply targets of opportunity or errors in prey identification by healthy animals.  Cougars eat deer.  People are roughly deer-sized.  Cats instinctively bounce prey-sized stuff that moves.  North American humans seem to be pretty good at terminating first-time offenders, so there aren't any Patterson / Corbett style stories of habitual mountain lion man eaters that I'm aware of.  I've got to wonder how many people killed by cougars are actually eaten, or if it's more often a case of "Oops!  Sorry!  Thought you were Bambi. . . and you smell and taste TERRIBLE!  Won't happen again".  Wiki at least isn't all that clear on the gruesome details, but according to California DFW stats,  only 3 of the of the 14 attacks since 1986 were fatal, and all of the five of little kids attacked were among the non-fatals when they should have been easy, quick kills if the cat was serious.  The DFW page also mentions a "non-attack" where the cat aborted the approach when it realized the "prey" it was stalking was a turkey-calling hunter who was camouflaged to the nines.  It also briefly mentions four fatalities among six victims over a hundred years ago - doesn't say whether they were killed and snacked on or died of infection in a pre-antibiotic age. 

    I hunt deer in an area where I have seen evidence of mountain lions doing the same thing I am.  If I go out rasslin' with one (or a black bear), I won't take it personally.  I'm no starry-eyed, bunny-hugging PETA freak - - I have no problems snuffing a confirmed man-eater, but I have to wonder about the efficacy/sense of killing a carnivore for having followed it's instincts on it's own turf; and I frequently roll my eyes at the outcry/policy to "DO SOMETHING" when such things happen.  If you walk in the woods, you might get to play Darwin Roulette with the things that live in them.  If you want a "safe" nature walk, maybe you should take your chances with the drug dealers in the local park instead. For my part, I'll be thankful for the spooky creatures keeping you scared and out of "my" National Forest.  Just sayin'.

    Cougars like most predators are very territorial. For centuries they have seen humans kill deer which are one of their major food sources. Humans are competing predators and trespassers, rarely prey. The bicyclist in Washington State was one of the exceptions as the cougar was underweight and possibly nearing starvation. It was scared off by the other bicyclist so we wont know if it would have actually eaten it's human prey. A few years after the bleeding heart liberals accomplished the 1994 ban on hunting bears and cougars with dogs as being un-sportsman like. They were crying the blues when their kitties and poodles were disappearing. Not from bears.     


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