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Randall Made Knives

JKPJKP Senior MemberNorth FloridaPosts: 2,657 Senior Member
My Dad recently gave me a couple of Randall Made knives that were handed down to him. They were purchased new in the 50s and had been sharpened with some sort of grinding wheel or similar prior to my Dad getting them. 

I sent them to Randall with hopes they could work some restoration magic. Did they ever! These things look new and are crazy sharp. 

Now I need to work on the original sheaths. I'm thinking maybe some saddle soap to start - any suggestions?


Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Those are beautiful!

    I think Wambli printed us up an in depth tutorial once on leather care and restoration. Perhaps he'll advise you.

    I only have one Randall. It's capable of taking a razor sharp edge.
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 4,711 Senior Member
    Beauties, love the dagger.

    Sako
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,908 Senior Member
    Use saddle soap, then Neatsfoot oil to restore the leather.
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Central MNPosts: 14,575 Senior Member
    Wow, those look very nice for 60 year old knives.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • wddodgewddodge Senior Member Northwest OhioPosts: 1,150 Senior Member
    Randall made knives are worthy of any collection. One day I'll have one or two..

    Denny
    Participating in a gun buy back program because you think that criminals have too many guns is like having yourself castrated because you think your neighbors have too many kids.... Clint Eastwood
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Pensacola, FLPosts: 10,809 Senior Member
    edited September 2018 #7
    Like the tooth pick. I had an Old Timer Boot knife years ago. Disappeared when I moved home from Alaska.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,908 Senior Member
    jbp-ohio said:
    Like the tooth pick. I had an Old Timer Boot knife years ago. Disappeared when I moved home from Alaska.
    You could replace it with one of these.  Not as pretty, but extremely functional.


    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,228 Senior Member
    edited September 2018 #9
    Randall’s are a substantial investment up front but they provide lifetimes of service and the company stands by their products forever.  

    The sheaths look to be in good shape.  I agree with what has been said about saddle soap.  I’d soak the sheaths overnight in warm water to loosen up dirt and body oils and then clean off surface dirt with a wet sponge and saddle soap.  Rinse off the saddle soap real well with warm water.

    Dry off all excess water with a rag or paper towels.  Then I’d let them dry overnight and give them a LIGHT rub with a rag with some olive oil on it and call it good.  I use neatsfoot oil on my saddles and whips but not usually on holsters and sheaths because it’s thick and tends to make the leather too soft.

    Those are BEAUTIFUL knives that should serve several generations really well.  
    This....while useful in so?some applications,  Neatsfoot oil isn't your friend with holsters and knife sheaths..
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,228 Senior Member
    Oh yeah...beautiful blades...I think I hate you
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JKPJKP Senior Member North FloridaPosts: 2,657 Senior Member
    Randall’s are a substantial investment up front but they provide lifetimes of service and the company stands by their products forever.  

    The sheaths look to be in good shape.  I agree with what has been said about saddle soap.  I’d soak the sheaths overnight in warm water to loosen up dirt and body oils and then clean off surface dirt with a wet sponge and saddle soap.  Rinse off the saddle soap real well with warm water.

    Dry off all excess water with a rag or paper towels.  Then I’d let them dry overnight and give them a LIGHT rub with a rag with some olive oil on it and call it good.  I use neatsfoot oil on my saddles and whips but not usually on holsters and sheaths because it’s thick and tends to make the leather too soft.

    Those are BEAUTIFUL knives that should serve several generations really well.  
    Thanks. By soak do you mean immerse in water overnight?

  • dlddld Member NE FlaPosts: 466 Member
    if you are going to use these Randall's buy a replacement sheath off e-bay. the original sheaths can be worth some money. If you are going to just admire them then you are in good shape.
    Don't store the knives in the sheath
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