40-82 cartridge

ajkellerusmcvma311ajkellerusmcvma311 Posts: 4 New Member
We found this old cartridge in the desert near Winslow AZ. It is a 40-32 WCF with manufacturing marks from WRA Co. The bullet is lead and is corroded, the case is very tarnished.

Can anyone tell us how old this cartridge could be? It appears to have been laying in the desert for a very long time. 

Replies

  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,280 Senior Member
    Struck primer and lead still in the case too
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,171 Senior Member
    40-82 WCF was chambered in the Winchester model 1886 which where manufactured between 1886 and 1935. 
    I would guess it was a discarded miss-fire.
    Sako
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    Maybe a Sharps buffalo rifle?

    Nope I was wrong.
    Winchester 1885 single shot ( highwall?)
    1886 lever action.

    My book says rifles so chambered are rare despite its excellent for the time ballistic performance because they were usually rechambered later in life. It was a heavy game number loaded with blackpowder originally and lasted long enough to transition to smokeless. The popular bullet weight seems to be 260 grains.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 18,004 Senior Member
    I guess I missed that when I passed through Winslow last year...

    But this kind of thing fascinates me!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    When a auditory click reverberated through the dry desert air, was needed game lost? Or something more consequential?
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 28,144 Senior Member
    edited October 1 #7
    Looks like an old folded head case.  Maybe late 1800s early 1900s.

    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • ajkellerusmcvma311ajkellerusmcvma311 Posts: 4 New Member
    It for sure looks like the Folded head case in the illustration posted by Wambli Ska which means it has most likely been laying in the AZ Desert for close to 100 years! I wonder if it has a black powder charge inside or if it is smokeless powder?
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,409 Senior Member
    Pull the bullet and find out....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,409 Senior Member
    That cartridge is in remarkable condition...most discovered of that vintage are paper thin and brittle
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 18,004 Senior Member
    Send it back to Winchester and tell them its defective and you want a replacement...

    More seriously, what Jayhawker said - pull the bullet and see what kinda powder's in it - if any.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,280 Senior Member
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    I think it does. Smokeless powder will likely be dust. BP should still be recognisable.

    I'd leave it be and start a collection of desert artifacts. The OP could also research recorded events of the area for comparison.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,280 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    I think it does. Smokeless powder will likely be dust. BP should still be recognisable.

    I'd leave it be and start a collection of desert artifacts. The OP could also research recorded events of the area for comparison.
    I am guessing NO powder in it if it did not go off.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,494 Senior Member
    The primer's likely the dud. If not the bullet should have been propelled into the bore and got stuck there.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,409 Senior Member
    edited October 2 #16
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    As interesting an artifact as it is, it's dollar value is not significant. You can pull the bullet without damaging it with a kinetic puller after padding the chamber with some cotton balls. Gentle taps rather than big swings ( The only caution to keep in mind is if the case walls have deteriorated). After investigating the contents of the case, simply put the bullet back in the case
    It would also be interesting to see that kind of bullet it actually is.
    It's entirely possible that this is not a vintage cartridge at all...plenty of us straight wall cartridge nuts out there still shooting them on a regular basis. Plenty of rifles chambered for the are still out there in shooting condition





    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,280 Senior Member
    The primer's likely the dud. If not the bullet should have been propelled into the bore and got stuck there.
    Duh :s , you are correct.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,280 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    As interesting an artifact as it is, it's dollar value is not significant. You can pull the bullet without damaging it with a kinetic puller after padding the chamber with some cotton balls. Gentle taps rather than big swings ( The only caution to keep in mind is if the case walls have deteriorated). After investigating the contents of the case, simply put the bullet back in the case
    It would also be interesting to see that kind of bullet it actually is.
    It's entirely possible that this is not a vintage cartridge at all...plenty of us straight wall cartridge nuts out there still shooting them on a regular basis. Plenty of rifles chambered for the are still out there in shooting condition





    True, I assumed it was old.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • ajkellerusmcvma311ajkellerusmcvma311 Posts: 4 New Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    I think it does. Smokeless powder will likely be dust. BP should still be recognisable.

    I'd leave it be and start a collection of desert artifacts. The OP could also research recorded events of the area for comparison.
    I think I will keep it intact as You suggested, makes for a good conversation piece.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 28,144 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Does it lose any value if you pull the bullet?
    I think it does. Smokeless powder will likely be dust. BP should still be recognisable.

    I'd leave it be and start a collection of desert artifacts. The OP could also research recorded events of the area for comparison.
    I think I will keep it intact as You suggested, makes for a good conversation piece.
    Yep, that would be my call too.  The smokeless vs BP is just a curiosity thing since it affects nothing.  It's a neat old cartridge find in an interesting environment.  As has been said value is mostly as a curio and not a significant amount of money so I'd let it be just a conversation piece.  Sometimes it's more interesting to hod these things and day dream than to get real facts about them.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,812 Senior Member
    I googled it; it's an older cartridge indicated by the headstamp.  But it's not worth a whole lot, so whatever you want to do is fine.  From what I read, W.R.A. & CO means it's older, but I couldn't find a date reference. 
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
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