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I thought y'all said it was only southerners....

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  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    My rule is, if the roads are ice, I stay home.  I've seen a Grayhound bus slide off the freeway sideways because he was forced to come to a complete stop on a banked curve.  Somehow on that day I managed to keep enough space between me and the vehicle in front of me that I never had to stop.  BTW, I idled all the way over that mountain pass, and haven't driven on ice since, except on a bicycle.
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    I learned to drive on red clay roads with no gravel. When it rained, those roads were slick as snail snot. Good for learning to drive on the occasional wet snow we get that turns to packed crushed ice after it's driven over a few times.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,920 Senior Member
    Even in the Great White North, there is an annual learning curve when snow falls for the first time in a given year...Folks end up in the ditch all over the place until they remember how to drive on the white stuff....

    Just had our first serious snow last night so yesterday I put about 300 pounds of sand tubes in the back of the truck in case I have to go anywhere....but... it's just easier to stay home until the county gets things cleared and salted...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Down South we don't have much in the way of snow removal equipment. We just wait until it warms up and melts.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,659 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    ...until the county gets things cleared and salted...
    Ugh - another reason to avoid the white stuff. I wouldn't be able to drive a 34 year old car in that kind of country - there wouldn't be anything of it left!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    The worst I've been in was a sudden white-out condition in Wolf Creek Pass. (Yep, it really exists). It took us over 3 hours to cover 10 miles, and it was white knuckle all the way. MY BIL was driving and for most of that time I had my head stuck out the passenger window trying to let him know where the edge of the road was. This was important since in switchbacks shoulders are almost non-existant and Colorado seems to not consider guardrails too important unless the drop is over 500 feet. But this was truly extreme. I've not experienced anything close since.

    Closer to home, while not as terrifying as above, I was driving home from work one evening. Light snowfall with maybe at most 2" accumulation. Traffic was backed up on the Interstate for a mile at every exit. My exit was a gradual downhill slope. I was having no problem while moving. The problem was after sitting stopped for a couple minutes my truck would start sliding forward and sideways even with me standing on the brakes. All I can figure is that the warmth of my tires would melt the top layer of snow, but after a couple minutes it would refreeze. The end result was that not only was the road surface frozen, but my tires had turned into iceskates. 

    That was one hairy commute.

    Mike


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,920 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    Jayhawker said:
    ...until the county gets things cleared and salted...
    Ugh - another reason to avoid the white stuff. I wouldn't be able to drive a 34 year old car in that kind of country - there wouldn't be anything of it left!
    That's why you run your vehicle through the car wash every couple of week...not a speck of rust on any of my vehicles...including my wife's 1998 Jeep.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,128 Senior Member


    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,493 Senior Member
     No experience with snow, but...

    Here in FL, folks seem to have a total brain freeze and anxiety attack when it rains. Doesn't matter what their license plate says.

    That's really inconvenient in this state.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    I get irritated when they plow the snow. If it’s over 8”,  okay I can see plowing it but I’d rather it just fall and lay the way it is. The city must not realize that it acts like railroad tracks and offers more traction than the mess the plow trucks leave behind.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,659 Senior Member
    edited November 2018 #42
     No experience with snow, but...

    Here in FL, folks seem to have a total brain freeze and anxiety attack when it rains. Doesn't matter what their license plate says.

    That's really inconvenient in this state.
    I have not seen this - people here seem to know how to drive in the rain to my observation - certainly better than in Mexifornia where they all go 45 in a 65 as soon as the first micro drop hits the windshield.
    Must be relative...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,093 Senior Member
    Mike, I concur with the 1-2" of snow being the worst. Unfortunately, that's about a normal snow total here and it normally follows a couple of warm days, then rain changing to snow. So there's almost ALWAYS a layer of ice under the snow
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    I get irritated when they plow the snow. If it’s over 8”,  okay I can see plowing it but I’d rather it just fall and lay the way it is. The city must not realize that it acts like railroad tracks and offers more traction than the mess the plow trucks leave behind.
    TRUE THIS!!!

    If 2" fall they plow endlessly until the only surface left is ice. My advice, if it's 6" or less.....leave it alone. More than that......plow it down to about 2" above the road surface. Scraping down to the ice is hardly helpful.
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    The worst I've been in was a sudden white-out condition in Wolf Creek Pass. (Yep, it really exists). It took us over 3 hours to cover 10 miles, and it was white knuckle all the way. MY BIL was driving and for most of that time I had my head stuck out the passenger window trying to let him know where the edge of the road was. This was important since in switchbacks shoulders are almost non-existant and Colorado seems to not consider guardrails too important unless the drop is over 500 feet. But this was truly extreme. I've not experienced anything close since.


    Mike


    My worst was the 4th. elk season in Colorado 1969, we were coming back from Gypsum on old hiway 6 before the tunnel and I-70 were completed I had my 67 Bronco pulling a 17' travel trailer. going up the west side of Loveland Pass wasn't to bad, snowing until we got close to the top (12,000') than we were in blizzard conditions coming down the east side was a nightmare, almost complete whiteout , I was in lo 4wd at about 5 mph and thanks to good trailer breaks and my wife holding a flashlite out the window so i could see the side if the road we made it to Georgetown where we spent the night in George Pugh's service station. For those of you who have never been across Loveland Pass the switchbacks are kinda like a snake with a broken back.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,093 Senior Member
    Yep, got the Eisenhower tunnel now, so you don't have to drive it
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    cpj said:
    The purpose of plowing even small amounts is to make it melt faster. What’s gonna melt faster? 5” of slush, or .5” of ice/snow combo? 
    Who cares! According to Al Gore the global climate change Ho, the polar bears are gonnna be wearing Raybans, wearing SPF 70 suntan lotion, and chasing seals on Hobie Catamarans in a few years anyway! :D:D:D:D:D:D
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,161 Senior Member
    edited November 2018 #48
    The thing about N vs S is that if it snows 1-12 inches, i still have to get my ass to work on time up here.....
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    cpj said:
    The purpose of plowing even small amounts is to make it melt faster. What’s gonna melt faster? 5” of slush, or .5” of ice/snow combo? 
    Except the **** isn’t even going to consider melting until the end of winter. I’d rather drive in the 5” anyday.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,625 Senior Member
    I get irritated when they plow the snow. If it’s over 8”,  okay I can see plowing it but I’d rather it just fall and lay the way it is. The city must not realize that it acts like railroad tracks and offers more traction than the mess the plow trucks leave behind.
    If you don' t clear around the intersections it gets all polished up from stopping and starting with spinning tires, that is the biggest problem I have, you find out the hard way the intersection is like this and you do the quick left and right look and just go for it if you can, once everybody gets the hang of winter driving this is usually no big deal, but stuff gets interesting some mornings. 
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    It does when the plows keep compacting it down to ice.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,625 Senior Member
    It does when the plows keep compacting it down to ice.
    True, timing is important.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,690 Senior Member
    Perspectives: For me driving in the US, usually in FL, is an absolute driver's pleasure, specially considering the kind of traffic we have to deal with down here; still, didn't drove in CO when we visited it 2 years ago since we didn't had to and winter driving conditions aren't my favorite, and noticed that people in NY tend to drive really fast.

    Our dull local climate that never drops below 55°F and has no virtual rains prevents us from learning snow driving skills; for me it was a first time some years ago when the in-laws took us from Chile to Argentina in a ski trip; had to attend a friend's wedding at Santiago so my BIL took his little Toyota Yaris along with my SIL's van so we could return 2 days earlier; basically got a crash-course of how to install tire chains and the advice of keeping a constant speed and never letting the accelerator go, and off we went in a dreadful snow storm through almost deserted country roads and with the mandatory crossing pass of the Andes as "bonus".
    Surprisingly the little front-wheel drive sedan withstood without chains most of the 120+ miles of steep, curvy snow-covered mountain roads, including many long non-paved sections, until just 2 miles short of the Argentinian side of the border checkpoint, where  I slipped into the curb and ended up stuck in the snow with no tire traction whatsoever; took some time, effort and hands freezing but finally was able to put the tire chains and free the car, but kept struggling with the snow for a few more hours until we reached the city of Pucon in the Chilean side, but then had to deal with a very heavy rain that poured on us for the rest of the 500-miles trip....not what I'd consider fun at all!!
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    I'd rather drive on rough rutted ice than snowplowed smooth ice. At least you have a bit of traction. Leave the plows in the barn until it hits 8". I don't care how long it takes to melt. Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Germans are good, but aggressive drivers. They pay a lot to go to mandatory driving school...............Fahrschule.

    If they weren't, their population would be more decimated on the Autobahns than it already is.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    One major issue that most folks don't consider anymore when buying tires is the compound that they're made of. You can find two similar tread patterns with one tire costing quite a bit more than the other and it's usually because it has a higher natural rubber content. Cheap tires are mostly polyester and wear out fast and don't grip for crap on ice. A high quality tire with a high rubber content will grip substantially better on ice. I grew up in Wisconsin in the days of chains and studded snow tires and in the mid seventies my dad put a set of General radials on my mom's car and they gripped so well that he didn't have to put the snow tires on it anymore. Tread pattern isn't the only big difference between tires.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,659 Senior Member
    Big Chief said:
    Germans are good, but aggressive drivers. They pay a lot to go to mandatory driving school...............Fahrschule.

    If they weren't, their population would be more decimated on the Autobahns than it already is.
    I think drivers pretty much anywhere in Europe are better than Americans from what little I've observed. Remind me to tell you about the time my wife almost ran a cop off the road just outside Rhodes town...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Italian taxi drivers were my overseas favorites. All were a bunch of Mario Andretti wannabes. One foot on accelerator, one hand on the horn, and screaming obscenities out the open driver's window. Best ride EVER! :D
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,161 Senior Member
    I'd rather drive on rough rutted ice than snowplowed smooth ice. At least you have a bit of traction. Leave the plows in the barn until it hits 8". I don't care how long it takes to melt. Mike
    That would work if every car had the same width. You may be fine in a truck, but try it in a Chevy Spark.

    I had a Cruze and it would bounce from one rut to the other like it had a mind of its own.....
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    If SOMEBODY would come up with some updated tire chains that didn't make the car/truck ride like it was self destructing, then that would be good.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,659 Senior Member
    Halftrack...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
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