Feeding the Hungry

ZeeZee Senior MemberPosts: 20,564 Senior Member
edited January 20 in Hunting #1
Got two more “Depredation Permit” deer this evening.  





A doe and her yearling. Shot the doe at 210 yards through the neck with my short .308 Win and 168gr ELD-Match bullets. She dropped and the yearling ran about 40 yards and stopped to look back. 



At 250 yards, I put a round through its head and done. 



Two buddies from work are appreciative of the free meat. Considering the current situation. 😒

Glad I have the opportunity to help others. 
"To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith

Replies

  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Think I’m gonna start using one of my .223 Remington ARs. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    I am very glad this all goes toward a good cause-- feeding hard working families that deserve a break. One year, I was having a rough time. My brother killed an elk and I got half of it. I didn't have any other option but to feed the family with elk every day for a couple of months-- it was all we had. Elk is delicious, but after a while and no other choices, it kind of wore me down but I felt blessed. I am forever grateful for that elk that sustained us.

    Anyway, you are doing God's work. Keep it up!
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member

    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,549 Senior Member
    It's a shame that government regulations prevent feral hogs from being donated. Knowing how  some folks take care of game meat, I can kind of understand it, but there should still be a way to grade the meat for the same program that allows deer meat to be donated. I don't know how it is elsewhere, but around here, you can trap feral hogs and take them to a slaughterhouse alive, or to an auction, but there are no provisions that allow hogs that were killed in the field to be donated for food. Lots of folks do it (or so I hear), but without consulting the government.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,939 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    Think I’m gonna start using one of my .223 Remington ARs. 
    Probably a decent call for cull work.  While it's not as if you don't know how to crank a bolt gun in a hurry, you seem to be doing a fair number of these "skeet doubles".  Since the game has now gone from fun and varying the diet to the essential feeding of folks, ya gotta be a good caveman and choose the most effective tools for the job.

    Continuing education on bullet design, no doubt.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,219 Senior Member
    edited January 20 #7
    Good on you, man.  This whole shutdown is a bummer, especially for the people who simply want to go to work and earn an honest living.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,525 Senior Member
    Good deal for the farmer, those that get fresh meat and you for science.
    Well done 
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,525 Senior Member
    .
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    It's a shame that government regulations prevent feral hogs from being donated. Knowing how  some folks take care of game meat, I can kind of understand it, but there should still be a way to grade the meat for the same program that allows deer meat to be donated. I don't know how it is elsewhere, but around here, you can trap feral hogs and take them to a slaughterhouse alive, or to an auction, but there are no provisions that allow hogs that were killed in the field to be donated for food. Lots of folks do it (or so I hear), but without consulting the government.
    I give dead pigs away all the time. But, it’s to friends and family, so no issues. 

    Food bank won’t take them. But, they’ll take deer. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Diver43 said:
    Good deal for the farmer, those that get fresh meat and you for science.
    Well done 
    Thanks. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Bigslug said:
    Zee said:
    Think I’m gonna start using one of my .223 Remington ARs. 
    Probably a decent call for cull work.  While it's not as if you don't know how to crank a bolt gun in a hurry, you seem to be doing a fair number of these "skeet doubles".  Since the game has now gone from fun and varying the diet to the essential feeding of folks, ya gotta be a good caveman and choose the most effective tools for the job.

    Continuing education on bullet design, no doubt.
    Well, I shoot two at a time because that all I want to deal with at once. Gutting, skinning, quartering more than two makes for a longer night than I want to put in. 

    Thirteen in two hours is the most I’ve dealt with. But, there was a food bank freezer truck at the barn. All that needed done was gutting/tagging and throwing them in the refer truck. The food bank picked it up the next day. 

    I ain’t gutting/skinning/quartering 13 deer!!!

    Using the .223 is simply because I want a change of scenery in firearms, don’t want to tear up as much meat, and it’s a little quieter. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,978 Senior Member
    The slayer is out helping people again-Good work!
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,549 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    bisley said:
    It's a shame that government regulations prevent feral hogs from being donated. Knowing how  some folks take care of game meat, I can kind of understand it, but there should still be a way to grade the meat for the same program that allows deer meat to be donated. I don't know how it is elsewhere, but around here, you can trap feral hogs and take them to a slaughterhouse alive, or to an auction, but there are no provisions that allow hogs that were killed in the field to be donated for food. Lots of folks do it (or so I hear), but without consulting the government.
    I give dead pigs away all the time. But, it’s to friends and family, so no issues. 

    Food bank won’t take them. But, they’ll take deer. 
    Yep, lots of folks do this, and I highly approve of it as a way to benefit even further than the main solution of ridding the farmers and ranchers of the scourge that threatens their livelihood, in many cases. I have passed up a lot of easy shots, simply because I didn't want to waste the good meat. I have always been encouraged to kill all of them I could, but I just can't overcome the feeling that I know I would get, if I let the meat ruin.

    Keep up the good work. Controlling the problem by efficient hunting and trapping is a much better conservation solution than 'eradication at any cost.'
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,476 Senior Member

    I'm surprised that Six-Gun didn't mention this, but the meat processor we used in Montana has a program like this.  You bring in your deer, pay regular processing fees plus $10, and the processed meat will be donated to a feeding the hungry program of some sort.

    Some of these government sponsored or monitored programs require that the animal be processed by a licensed facility.  I can see the need for that, although it does make it more costly to be generous.  If you know people who are willing to take your kill as is, that's the best way to go, in my opinion.

    When I was in high school, we tagged 10 deer one year, which was more than our family would eat.  We gave several away.

    Zee, well done!

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,219 Senior Member
    edited January 23 #16

    I'm surprised that Six-Gun didn't mention this, but the meat processor we used in Montana has a program like this.  You bring in your deer, pay regular processing fees plus $10, and the processed meat will be donated to a feeding the hungry program of some sort.

    Some of these government sponsored or monitored programs require that the animal be processed by a licensed facility.  I can see the need for that, although it does make it more costly to be generous.  If you know people who are willing to take your kill as is, that's the best way to go, in my opinion.

    When I was in high school, we tagged 10 deer one year, which was more than our family would eat.  We gave several away.

    Zee, well done!

    I actually thought about that, and should also mention that Nebraska runs a similar "Hunters Helping the Hungry" program that allows indigent families to receive donated game meat from state licensed processors at no cost to them.  The best part?  The program doesn't cost the hunter a penny (at least not directly).  

    The whole program is managed using donated dollars when folks buy licenses.  I try to chip in a dollar or two when I check out for tags.  The spare money adds up enough that all anyone donating a deer has to do is show up with a clean, field dressed specimen at one of the participating processors and drop it off.  The state pays the processors a fixed price and the families in need get the meat.

    The only catch is that you can't donate any deer taken outside of Nebraska.  A valid, cancelled Nebraska deer permit is a prerequisite for making a donation.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,045 Senior Member
    Just to put it out there, Michigan also has a program called "Hunters for the Hungry". When you buy your license online, you get asked if you want to contribute a dollar or two. Anyway, it enables hunters to donate their game at no cost to them that will feed needy people.

    I have seen the results on the other side too... a woman I know got a few pounds of ground venison as part of her food bank package. Since she loves venison, she was happy as hell! It really does go to help people down on their luck.
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