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How BIG guns were made in 1908

tennmiketennmike Senior MemberPosts: 27,395 Senior Member
Ever wonder how a big artillery piece was made? Here's a German silent film that shows the process. Pretty interesting stuff, and I thought you might like it. At the end of the video there are links to other videos of how guns are made.


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Replies

  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Here's another good one. Check out that rifling cutter at about the 3:25 minute mark!



      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    And just for kicks, some pre 1930 warships. You ought to get a kick out of the armament on them and the shape of the ships back then. They had some big guns on those things!



      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,622 Senior Member
    tennmike said:
    Ever wonder how a big artillery piece was made? Here's a German silent film that shows the process. Pretty interesting stuff, and I thought you might like it. At the end of the video there are links to other videos of how guns are made.


    2 minute mark, the guy is standing on a ladder pouring steel. 5 minute mark, apparently German chains NEVER break, wow, how did anyone ever work in those places and not die or get injured daily? 
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    tennmike said:
    Ever wonder how a big artillery piece was made? Here's a German silent film that shows the process. Pretty interesting stuff, and I thought you might like it. At the end of the video there are links to other videos of how guns are made.


    2 minute mark, the guy is standing on a ladder pouring steel. 5 minute mark, apparently German chains NEVER break, wow, how did anyone ever work in those places and not die or get injured daily? 
    Back then, personnel safety wasn't really a high priority.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,654 Senior Member
    Boy, the French sure made some strange looking boats!
    But has anyone anywhere ever made a Monitor that wasn't butt ugly?
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Thanks Mike, very interesting, OSHA would have had a ball back than.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    You're right about OSHA having a ball back then. Lots of people working in those factories overseas and here in the U.S. got hurt on a regular basis back then. Mining was also really dangerous, too. Rock dust, coal dust, and high concentrations of radon and other gases killed slow or fast. In that video on making the big guns, there are several instances where people were walking under a load suspended from a crane. Good way to check out of the chain breaks.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 601 Senior Member
    Back then on miming and construction jobs deaths were factored into the project. Safety sure wasn’t looked at the same then as now days. As much as I hate some of the bs on construction sites about safety. looking at old films or photos really make you realize you’re lucky to have the b.s.
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 2,119 Senior Member
    Back in the early days of power grids in the U.S. it has been reported that the mortality rate of linesmen was over 80%
  • kansashunterkansashunter Senior Member Posts: 1,812 Senior Member
    That was a neat video, thanks for posting it. My great great grandfather was killed in a sawmill and that was one reason my great grandfather homesteaded here at 16 years old. Back then if you got killed there wasn't an insurance policy or anything else so the widow was left with no income. 
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Kansashunter, sawmilling and tree felling was another of those jobs that was really dangerous back then, and still is now. Trees doing a running split up the trunk, or kicking back on the stump, or just falling wrong did in a lot of timber felling folk. And the sawmills had all kinds of stuff you had to watch out for. Both are still dangerous professions; the equipment has changed, but the trees are still dangerous.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 601 Senior Member
    Just watched the first video. It’s is pretty amazing what could be done at that time period. Wish I could find a version of that film in English my German is no bueno.
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 601 Senior Member
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXoP1f26FDE&feature=share
    This isn’t exactly big guns. Still interesting and who don’t like a Shiloh sharps.
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