A question for turkey hunters...

knitepoetknitepoet Senior MemberPosts: 18,672 Senior Member
Would this classify as a "long beard" gobbler?

I've been turkey hunting a grand total of ONCE in my life and know somewhere between very little, to nothing about it.
I have heard folks talk about one's weight and how long the beard and or spurs were on a "trophy" though.
Hence my question.
Cousin that owns the old home place won't allow turkey hunting, but was just wondering if this one would qualify as a "good one"?



Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,837 Senior Member
    Looks to be a mature but still a younger bird....if he's standing upright and his beard is coming close to touching the ground...he's a "long beard"
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,727 Senior Member
    What Jayhawker said, but, any turkey with a beard and in range is a good one
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    Thanks.
    He's been seen with a bunch of jakes with what, I would guess, are 2-3" beards
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    edited February 28 #5
    That bird pictured is assuredly a mature Tom.  At a glance, I'd guess him to be 7-8" beard range.  Jayhawker gave a very good reference to determine if what you're seeing is a true "longbeard" of the 10-12"+ range.  

    What you'll notice with REALLY old longbeards is a condition colloquially known as "beard rot".  That is, their beard has gotten so long that it drags on the ground almost perpetually and actually starts to degrade.  The tips of the beard get worn and grayish-white.  It's the reason why some folks argue that spur length is a more fair indicator of turkey trophy quality than beard length, as some otherwise massive birds lose a decent amount of beard length as they age to rot.  That's not typically the case with the spurs unless the bird is fighting constantly or otherwise damages them.

    All of that aside, if I see that bird in the pic come through, unless he has an absolute freight train Tom strutting in behind him with a beard near his ankles, he's getting shot.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,837 Senior Member
    Some years back I pulled off a spot and stalk on a henned up old boss gobbler that I had been chasing for awhile.When I first saw him he had a magnificent beard that was dragging he ground...when I shot him two weeks later his beard was a ragged 3" brush from all the fighting he had been doing....Still the biggest Eastern I have ever shot.,
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    Thanks guys.
    I think they've got the memo that they are safe, from the way some of them act.
    A couple of years ago, I had a flock of nearly a dozen hens walk, and feed within 15 feet of me, while I was prone on the ground.
    Last time I went to swap out the cards in my cameras(last week), had 3 jakes walking/trotting in front of my truck for nearly 200 yards. Their only concern seemed to be staying out from under it.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,545 Senior Member
    Hens are really careless and jakes are fairly careless so getting close to them is not a challenge. When you get a flock of hens eating out of your hand, scan the tree line and look around 30 to 50 yards back and you might see a mature tom watching his harem. He's the challenge.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    edited February 28 #9
    Hens are really careless and jakes are fairly careless so getting close to them is not a challenge. When you get a flock of hens eating out of your hand, scan the tree line and look around 30 to 50 yards back and you might see a mature tom watching his harem. He's the challenge.
    Very true.  I ended up shooting a hen with a flintlock .36 cal rifle during PA’s Fall turkey season because a group of careless hens walked within 70 yards of me during the preceding early muzzleloader deer season.  

    I made a mental note of where they walked and simply set up right there when Fall turkey opened for an easy kill a month later.  Had they ran away before I ever saw them, I never would’ve even realized they were in the area.

    On the flipside, I've had a boss Tom strutting for a hen in the middle of a pack of satellite Toms that made for an impossible approach.  Ended up taking a consolation prize Tom from the fringes since there was no way on earth I was going to get close enough for a shot on the big boy in the middle, and he wasn't budging from the girl in front of his nose.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,685 Senior Member
    My largest bird weighed 28 pounds and had a ragged 8 1/2 to 9 inch beard.  He was so old that his spurs were rounded and worn down to a nubbin.   He had good flavor but he was as tough as shoe leather.  I will only shoot jakes now...….robin
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,440 Senior Member
    I've harvested exactly one turkey in my life. He had a 6 1/2'" beard and all the Texas guys thought it a really good one. So much for "All things are bigger in Texas". 

    And said turkey succumbed to a single shot at 110 yards from a .270 Win. Standard, not magnum, mind you. So much for the .270 Win being inadequate against big game.

    So there. Don't believe everything you hear.

    Mike


    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    It's almost that magical time of the year, "turkey lurkey season as we call it here"!  This will be the first opening day of turkey season I've ever missed in 40 plus years of hunting them.  I'll be in France for a week of engineering meetings and then the wife and I are taking a week to see Switzerland!  However, come Sat the 13th I'll be back on them.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,837 Senior Member

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,727 Senior Member
    It's almost that magical time of the year, "turkey lurkey season as we call it here"!  This will be the first opening day of turkey season I've ever missed in 40 plus years of hunting them.  I'll be in France for a week of engineering meetings and then the wife and I are taking a week to see Switzerland!  However, come Sat the 13th I'll be back on them.
    Dude, get your priorities straight ;)
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    I'm pretty sure this is the same tom, in full strut

    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 1,784 Senior Member
    Good picture!
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    thanks, got lucky that he decided to strut in front of my game cam
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,597 Senior Member
    Chootem!!
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    Can't
    Cousin that owns the place lets me hunt deer, and kill pigs, coyotes and crows, but turkey aren't allowed to be targeted :cry:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,597 Senior Member
    If the population grows as it has here, he will change his mind soon enough!
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,672 Senior Member
    Doubtful, he lives out in SoCal
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • Great OutdoorsGreat Outdoors Member Posts: 218 Member
    if your cousin is dumb enough to live in SoCal- shoot his dang gobbler.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,534 Senior Member
    if your cousin is dumb enough to live in SoCal- shoot his dang gobbler.
    Your just kidding right?  The cousin owns the property, cousin makes the rules.  Why would @knitepoet ; cause a family problem and lose all privileges?  Cousin may live in California because of a excellent job opportunity.  Comments like that make people look down on all hunters
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
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