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PTSD

hawk18hawk18 Senior MemberPosts: 742 Senior Member
I need opinions from those of you who have gone before. Several of you fit this category, having served in some form of combat. 

At 71 I have decided to quit putting off checking into and enrolling for VA benefits. I signed up Wednesday and am waiting for my booklet and ID card. I met with the VA disability people this morning. We discussed and submitted paper work for a loss of hearing due to naval gunfire. We'll see where that leads. 
Then, the lady references my DD214 and says that this, the Combat Action award, automatically qualifies me for PTSD classification and compensation. I'm a little sceptical, since I'm nearly perfect, and jokingly poopoo the whole idea. (I did ask her how much compensation but she had no idea). She pressed the issue. Actually, quite hard. I explained that I was living quite happily in my digital pond and didn't look forward to a bunch of analog people jumping into my head. She finally gave up but only after impressing upon me that I could change my mind at any time. 
So, have any of you gone through this PTSD thing and how much weight do they place on firearm ownership and and do you think it was an unnecessary invasion of privacy. 
Sorry this is so long. And, I don't need anyone to divulge private info beyond the obvious. You are a gun nut and your association with this bunch makes you suspect. 

Hawk

Replies

  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    PTSD designation can in some places conflict with gun ownership.


    I have a VA disability and go in for regular hearing exams. They always ask if I have PTSD
    I do not and tell them so and DO NOT HAVE PTSD.

    For the hearing exam to determine how bad your hearing is, they want to put you in a lighted closed booth, hence the PTSD question; if you can go in the booth with the door closed they
    drop the PTSD questions until next time.

    Bonified PTSD is a 100% disability; but, you have to positively apply for it. They don't
    automatically slap in on you just because you have been in some form of combat.


    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 3,966 Senior Member
    What NN said.

    First off, do you have PTSD? I'm guessing no, you probably would've known by now.

    Not sure, check here.

    Can the VA be a pain? Yup, it's happened to others so educate yourself on the topic. Here's a good starting point.

    If you don't have PTSD, don't worry about it and consider yourself fortunate.
    B)


    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    FWIW, I am 81, a vet, never been to the VA , I dont have PTSD all I can tell you is friends that go to the VA have related to me this same story, some of them said they had to really think as they were sure the questions were "loaded"

    I am sure this is the same tactic that some MDs and hospitals use on there questionnaire to find out if you are a gun owner.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 601 Senior Member
    Ill chime in in with my .02. They have been trying to get me  to put the ptsd on my disability for several years. I’m currently at 50%. I’ve been at the same 50% since I got out in 2004. They say i have ptsd my wife agrees I don’t agree. They have really tried pushing it since the middle of Obama’s first term. They tell me if I add it I would go too 100%. The money difference is huge i still have not and will not put it on there. They have started asking more firearms questions when I go to see my psychiatrist. It scares me to actually have a disability rating due to having ptsd. So I would say no to the ptsd part. There may be nothing to it and then it may lead somewhere you wouldn’t want it to lead too. On the good side my v.a experience has been good. 
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,915 Senior Member
    Ill chime in in with my .02. They have been trying to get me  to put the ptsd on my disability for several years. I’m currently at 50%. I’ve been at the same 50% since I got out in 2004. They say i have ptsd my wife agrees I don’t agree. They have really tried pushing it since the middle of Obama’s first term. They tell me if I add it I would go too 100%. The money difference is huge i still have not and will not put it on there. They have started asking more firearms questions when I go to see my psychiatrist. It scares me to actually have a disability rating due to having ptsd. So I would say no to the ptsd part. There may be nothing to it and then it may lead somewhere you wouldn’t want it to lead too. On the good side my v.a experience has been good. 
    You are a wise man.


    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • das68das68 Posts: 662 Senior Member
    PTSD is not nice
    ignore last  send



  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 601 Senior Member
    Yes the money would be nice. Around $3200 a month tax free and able to work all I want. It just scares the **** out of me. The way they do the ratings is weird to you would think 50% would be half of a 100% but it’s not.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Fortunately, all my 8 years in the USAF in Southeast Asia cost me was a marriage and an engineering degree, and a little while being unemployed, homeless, and living in my car.  My combat exposure was at 20,000 feet or more, and we only had to count a few holes in the airplane when we got back after some of those missions.  I probably could have made a pretty convincing case for disability overt that, but I chose not to.  Others of my friends and family were not so lucky, and they ended their military enlistments with some really scary emotional baggage.  I'd strongly suggest that you do everything in your power to avoid going on record with a PTSD diagnosis and concentrate on dealing with any issues unofficially through the various veterans' organizations and developing close ties with your fellow combat vets.  I get the same intrusive questions when I interact with the VA over my hearing loss issues, and I don't tolerate them, even to the point of being rude if necessary.  After a few tries, the inquisitors usually get the message and move on.  The same basic thing happened when I was interviewed for the Agent Orange registry, and I approached those questions the same way.    
  • hawk18hawk18 Senior Member Posts: 742 Senior Member
    Thank you gentlemen. You have confirmed my original feelings. 

    Hawk
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    Yes the money would be nice. Around $3200 a month tax free and able to work all I want. It just scares the **** out of me. The way they do the ratings is weird to you would think 50% would be half of a 100% but it’s not.
    A person on 100% VA has to read their disability designation carefully------if you get an unemployable designation you cannot openly work; they can and have taken action to
    pull your disability.

    I know of one martial arts instructor it happened to -----there are others, I just do not know them.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 601 Senior Member
    NN said:
    Yes the money would be nice. Around $3200 a month tax free and able to work all I want. It just scares the **** out of me. The way they do the ratings is weird to you would think 50% would be half of a 100% but it’s not.
    A person on 100% VA has to read their disability designation carefully------if you get an unemployable designation you cannot openly work; they can and have taken action to
    pull your disability.

    I know of one martial arts instructor it happened to -----there are others, I just do not know them.
    A person can work even receiving a rating of 100% from the va. Except if the person also has the designation of Total Disability Based On Indivisual Unemployabillity or also called (TDIU). Aside of this one designation you can work and make as much as you are able and still receive you’re va disability.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    Good you are aware of the rules.


    I had unemployable designation when I was 100%; I got cut to 60% after I
    had surgery for the agent orange cancer --but, the unemployable designation remains
    in my yearly disability letter.

    Not sure I care since I don't want a job anyway.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,094 Senior Member
    NN said:
    Good you are aware of the rules.


    I had unemployable designation when I was 100%; I got cut to 60% after I
    had surgery for the agent orange cancer --but, the unemployable designation remains
    in my yearly disability letter.

    Not sure I care since Clean won't let me get a job anyway.
    FIFY Ned,
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


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