The Highwaymen

JayhawkerJayhawker ModeratorPosts: 14,936 Senior Member
edited March 30 in Clubhouse #1
Just watched on Netflix....Really good movie about Frank Hamer and the hunt for Bonnie and Clyde....the weapons we spot on and identified properly....and they actually used a Colt Monitor...an amazing variant of the BAR with a Cutts Compensator..
Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
«1

Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,457 Senior Member
    I've read a little bit about Frank Hamer. Too much different source info for the legend not to be real. An amazing law man.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,469 Senior Member
    Watched it last night. Excellent.
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,511 Senior Member

    BIg Chief started a thread on this earlier.  He just didn't mention the name of the movie.  I replied to that thread.

    I liked it.  A lot.

    For a more complete description of the movie, check this web page.

    https://www.newsweek.com/highwaymen-true-story-netflix-movie-bonnie-clyde-frank-hamer-kevin-costner-1379421

    It was interesting to me that there wasn't a single line of dialogue for Bonnie or Clyde, and the movie did not even show their faces until they met their final destiny.

    Also, according to the credits at the end of the movie, 20,000 people attended Bonnie's funeral and 15,000 attended Clyde's.  In a way, they were folk heroes.  In a much bigger way, in my humble opinion, they were wanton killers.

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,076 Senior Member
    Am I the only one who thought this was going to be about Willie, Waylon, Johnny, and Kris?
    Overkill is underrated.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,457 Senior Member
    I've read about Bonnie and Clyde. He was an unconscionable murderer, that only prolonged his existence by a dogged persistence of long distance at a time when distance was prohibitive of travel and law. Any folk hero status they received was unfortunate and misguided.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,936 Senior Member
    My Dad was incarcerated at Eastham Prison Farm about the same time Clyde Barrow was...(He stole a car and drove it across state lines which was a Federal beef under the Dyer Act)...the abuse he suffered there ultimately contributed to his death at the age of 47...

    I have often wondered if Dad knew Clyde...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,936 Senior Member
    Anyway...back to the movie...refreshing to see this side of the story...the two murdering pieces of excrement have received far too much attention for far too long...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 1,793 Senior Member
    Am I the only one who thought this was going to be about Willie, Waylon, Johnny, and Kris?
    I thought about them 
  • Billy_BuddBilly_Budd Posts: 638 Senior Member
    Thanks for the recommendation. Will give it a go tonight. 
  • Billy_BuddBilly_Budd Posts: 638 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    My Dad was incarcerated at Eastham Prison Farm about the same time Clyde Barrow was...(He stole a car and drove it across state lines which was a Federal beef under the Dyer Act)...the abuse he suffered there ultimately contributed to his death at the age of 47...

    I have often wondered if Dad knew Clyde...
    Not to make light of your Pop but I find that Interesting history. My great-grandmother (she lived to be 102) would tell the stories that her dad told her when he was incarcerated in a Union POW camp during the Civil War. He was 16 when captured and ended up losing his hand due to an infection. Looking back, I find it incredible that a then living relative was relating Civil War stories to me. I was only around 12 back then but I remember those stories so vividly. I would always just sit there and listen in complete fascination. 
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,457 Senior Member
    I'm guessing any kind on incarceration during the depression was worse than any historical information can indicate. Very hard times. My grandpa ran liquor across the Detroit River from Canada for the Purple Gang until he realised the danger and quit. Road the trains for awhile too.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,936 Senior Member
    My Granddad on my Father's side disappeared without a trace during the Depression...we have been searching for him for years without success
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,256 Senior Member
  • mosseybuckmosseybuck Member Posts: 459 Member
    Am I the only one who thought this was going to be about Willie, Waylon, Johnny, and Kris?

    One of my favorite songs!

    USMC '59-'65, NRA Lifer, Tennessee Squire
  • Billy_BuddBilly_Budd Posts: 638 Senior Member
    Just finished watching. Wow! Great movie. 
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 702 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    My Dad was incarcerated at Eastham Prison Farm about the same time Clyde Barrow was...(He stole a car and drove it across state lines which was a Federal beef under the Dyer Act)...the abuse he suffered there ultimately contributed to his death at the age of 47...

    I have often wondered if Dad knew Clyde...
    Damn Jayhawker, that is a close connection to a pretty ruthless time and place, I wonder what he would have made of him.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,936 Senior Member
    Whether Dad knew him or not , I heard him opine on several occasions that Bonnie and Clyde were " inbred white trash"...but what did he know? I mean, he only lived through it...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 444 Member
    I also watched the movie Sunday. I liked that they done the movie from a different prospective. I wouldn’t say it was an excellent movie but I did like it. Jayhawker tjat is some interesting history. You may be able to get some information from the prison. 
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 702 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Whether Dad knew him or not , I heard him opine on several occasions that Bonnie and Clyde were " inbred white trash"...but what did he know? I mean, he only lived through it...
    I'd say he hit the nail on the head there....everything I've read leads me to believe that they had scant redeeming qualities.
  • olesniperolesniper Senior Member Posts: 3,749 Senior Member
    edited April 4 #21
    Just watched it. My dad used to get books from the Outdoor Life Book Club, in the late 50's, until his death, in 1961. I remember one was a collection of random stories, one of which was the story of the ambush, written by Gladys Hamer, as told to her by Frank. In the story, she said Frank stepped out and told them to get their hands up, when they reached for their guns, Frank fired 2 shots from his Remington Model 8 in .35 Remington.  A deputy, armed with a BAR, had orders to bust the engine block, if they tried to escape. Clyde's lifeless foot slid off of the clutch and the car started to roll and the deputy opened fire, followed by the rest of the posse members. The autopsies later showed that, besides all their other wounds, both Bonnie and Clyde each had a single .35 caliber bullet in their head. Hamer's Remington was the only .35 at the ambush. But who knows what actually happened. Every time I read something or see a video about the ambush, it's always a little different.
    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
    I will fear no evil: For I carry a .308 and not a .270
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,133 Senior Member
    I tried twice to watch the movie, but failed twice.  It was too slow for me.  I'll eventually watch it and I hear good reports on it
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 3,457 Senior Member
    olesniper said:
    Just watched it. My dad used to get books from the Outdoor Life Book Club, in the late 50's, until his death, in 1961. I remember one was a collection of random stories, one of which was the story of the ambush, written by Gladys Hamer, as told to her by Frank. In the story, she said Frank stepped out and told them to get their hands up, when they reached for their guns, Frank fired 2 shots from his Remington Model 8 in .35 Remington.  A deputy, armed with a BAR, had orders to bust the engine block, if they tried to escape. Clyde's lifeless foot slid off of the clutch and the car started to roll and the deputy opened fire, followed by the rest of the posse members. The autopsies later showed that, besides all their other wounds, both Bonnie and Clyde each had a single .35 caliber bullet in their head. Hamer's Remington was the only .35 at the ambush. But who knows what actually happened. Every time I read something or see a video about the ambush, it's always a little different.
    I've also read about the possible head shots. Frank Hamer was according to what I've read, not only an expert shot, but very cool under fire.
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 9,502 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    I tried twice to watch the movie, but failed twice.  It was too slow for me.  I'll eventually watch it and I hear good reports on it
    Yeah, it's not an action flick. It was a good movie still........
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 1,464 Senior Member
    Dead is dead......I like the 'old school' way of dealing with scum bag criminals.
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,936 Senior Member
    The gun shop scene was priceless...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,993 Senior Member
    WOW!  That was excellent!  I'm trying to think of a fugitive pursuit movie that ONLY follows from the L.E. side.  When you get right down to it, when you're hunting rabid dogs, who cares about the rabid dog's life back story?

    A little bit of Hollywood flair, but I'll forgive them.  I'm guessing Hamer dropped the equivalent of about $20,000-$30,000 dollars in today's money in the gun shop scene.  They weren't cheap, even then. :D  
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,936 Senior Member
    $30,000 today would have been about $2000.00 in 1930 dollars...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,410 Senior Member
    edited April 13 #29
    Haven't watched yet, but I'm wondering if the scene is factual (ish), or is it completely fabricated?  It strikes me as being borrowed from the dramatization of the "Hollywood shootout" (I don't remember the actual title and don't care enough to look for it) TV movie.  
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,410 Senior Member
    After reading a few articles on the killing, it appears to be fabrication.  Hamer used the Remington Model 8 that he had owned for some time, with another Model 8 he owned used by the other Ranger at the shooting. One of the Louisiana officers had a BAR.
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,993 Senior Member
    Haven't watched yet, but I'm wondering if the scene is factual (ish), or is it completely fabricated?  It strikes me as being borrowed from the dramatization of the "Hollywood shootout" (I don't remember the actual title and don't care enough to look for it) TV movie.  
    Having seen the actual car at Whiskey Pete's in Nevada, I think the car in The Highwaymen may have been shot up LESS.

    When you look at the photos of the car that were taken in 1934, while the windshield was still  more or less intact, the passenger side of the windshield has about a dozen holes in a basketball-sized group - that look like fairly straight-on impacts (from front or back of car, who knows? Both front and rear windows were hit) -  but the driver's side is still there and effectively clean, so I tend to doubt the story of Hamer taking two deliberate head shots - at least from the front.  I'd guess that the bulk of the posse was on the driver's side and whoever was shooting from the front probably figured they had Barrow covered, so he/they decided to focus on Parker.

    Most of the lead that did the job came through the driver's side doors at close to 90 degrees, and there are a lesser quantity of dents and exit perforations on Parker's door.  Barrow's shirt - also at Whiskey Pete's -  is an interesting study in what a large rifle will do to a small person.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.