Home Main Category Hunting

Game Cameras: Crutch or Critical?

breamfisherbreamfisher Senior MemberPosts: 13,490 Senior Member
I've heard hunters say that they think a game camera's one of the best things they can find for scouting an area. It allows them to check out a likely spot in a remote location without coming back super regularly and burning up gas.

Others say they give valuable insights into the game present and game behavior.

Still others say they're the lazy man's scouting tool and have no place in hunting.


What's your opinion?
Overkill is underrated.

Replies

  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    As I've mentioned on other posts, I'm on a lease that covers in the neighborhood of 3000 acres and there are eight people on the lease. We have an occasional guest but they're just "placed" in a spot where they can shoot something easy. We've got about a dozen camera's between us all and they are invaluable for tracking the patterns of the deer on our lease. When the rut pops up, I prefer to be in an area that has a shooter buck rather than just bumbling around in the woods on a swag.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,634 Senior Member
    I never thought much either way about them; if I find one I do pose in front of it though.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Game cameras are a very valuable tool in wildlife management. I don't see how the value of these tools could even be questioned. Our native Florida Panther population is expanding, and game cameras have documented several of the big cats moving up the east coast of Florida. It's just a matter of time before one is recorded on a game camera in the Panhandle of Florida, too. An intelligent tool that will tell you a lot about wildlife! Anyone who says cameras are a lazy man's scouting tool and have no place in a hunting situation is, IMO, living in a fantasy world!
  • bklysenbklysen Member Posts: 473 Member
    I've had 2 set up on property that differs quite a bit from what I'd normally rifle hunt. Different agriculture, human activity, etc.

    Since Sep.15th, through last week I've 'captured' 85 deer, with only 13 showing up during legal shooting hours. That piece of information alone gives me a few things to think about that no amount of tracks, rubs, scrapes etc. could offer.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,737 Senior Member
    It's three and a half hours drive to where I hunt, I wish I had a few. A friend has a couple but they're not the ones that send their data via phone, too bad. We haven't found too many bucks but we do see cougar and bear alot. Most of the deer he sees are immature buck and doe.

    Usefull tool.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,745 Senior Member
    You left out the biggest and most important criteria for me, which is impractical. I hunt mostly public land, and some of it is pretty far from where I live. If the situation was different, though, I would consider using one.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,048 Senior Member
    Game cameras are a very valuable tool in wildlife management. I don't see how the value of these tools could even be questioned. Our native Florida Panther population is expanding, and game cameras have documented several of the big cats moving up the east coast of Florida. It's just a matter of time before one is recorded on a game camera in the Panhandle of Florida, too. An intelligent tool that will tell you a lot about wildlife! Anyone who says cameras are a lazy man's scouting tool and have no place in a hunting situation is, IMO, living in a fantasy world!

    :up:

    Not to mention they are invaluable for watching out for 2 legged critturs that frequent hunting areas......
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    Hey Alec, a while back you were gonna post some pics taken with that high dollar camera that you bought while you were here. Well?? Now that I think of it, you were also gonna post the pics that you took while you were here. Well?????
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,004 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »

    We use them more to see whats out there, not hard core scouting. I mean, we hunt in the same area regardless, so it really doesnt make a difference what is on the cam. And to be honest, its cool to just see the critters.

    We use them to check for patterns, see when the pigs come in, do population checks, see the health of the herd. They are a great tool.

    Plus, I put some really funny porn on the memory card of 45er's game camera. It's a new way to play hunting camp pranks :)
    (I asked him later if there was anything interesting on his camera. He said, "oh, just two does mating.")
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • Win73Win73 Member Posts: 41 Member
    Game cameras are great for learning what deer are in an area and patterning them. I leave mine out all year. (I am fortunate in that I don't have to worry too much about them being stolen.) I just like studying the pictures of the deer that I get. And you can get a lot of interesting pictures of deer and other subjects. Mine enabled me to identify a poacher on my hunting property.

    Here are some examples of interesting (to me anyway) pictures that I got.

    These two guys stared at each other for about five minutes over the pile of corn between them.
    http://i869.photobucket.com/albums/ab252/cesample/1101232307bb.jpg

    Dinner time
    http://i869.photobucket.com/albums/ab252/cesample/1108181813Nursingfawn.jpg

    Let's see who is boss here!
    http://i869.photobucket.com/albums/ab252/cesample/1106190650Fightingdoes.jpg

    13 deer in this picture
    http://i869.photobucket.com/albums/ab252/cesample/110506065112deer.jpg
    (Luke 11:21 KJV) When a strong man armed keepeth his palace, his goods are in peace:
    (Luke 22:36 KJV) Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,120 Senior Member
    If I had regular access to - or owned - private land, I would absolutely use them. I take pride in successfully scouting public land on limited time, but I'm nt gonna lie: if I could do it 24/7 without spending hundreds of $$$ in gas to get the same net effect, I would.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Stick12Stick12 New Member Posts: 24 New Member
    I recently just bought my first game camera and am super excited to get it out in the field. I think it will be a great way to locate deer patterns and, if nothing else, just a cool way to see the wildlife in the area. I don't see trail cameras are exactly a NECESSITY, but since the technology has been invented, may as well use it. It's perfect for people who don't have endless hours to go out and scout, which most of us don't.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 20,850 Senior Member
    I think game camera's are another tool in a hunter's arsenal, nothing more, nothing less.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • bmlbml Senior Member Posts: 1,075 Senior Member
    If I had private land, I would use them all year long. I enjoy just seeing the deer.
    scottd wrote: »
    The milk of human kindness is often out dated and curdled.

    This is like watching a bunch or **** trying to hump a door knob.....
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    I love using them for hunting.

    They also work great for a number of things. I had some chickens going missing. Now I know who's dog is doing the crime and I can prove it to the owner.

    I have a semi-resident bull moose. We have a window when he sheads his antlers.

    We use them for determining effectiveness of trapping lures/sets for coyotes and bobcats.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,297 Senior Member
    I wonder if Daniel Boone would have used them?
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • Win73Win73 Member Posts: 41 Member
    PFD wrote: »
    I wonder if Daniel Boone would have used them?

    I don't know if Daniel Boone would have used them if they were available to him or not. However, I am not Daniel Boone and I do use them.
    (Luke 11:21 KJV) When a strong man armed keepeth his palace, his goods are in peace:
    (Luke 22:36 KJV) Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I would erase those photos.

    Why? Am I missing a joke?
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    What I would do is to ventilate those pooches with great vengeance. Then toss their bodies in a ditch. I would hate to have photographic proof that they were even in my yard. Plausible deniability and all that.

    Ah, got it. My problem is the dogs show up during the day while I'm at work. My only absentee option is a 330 conibear.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,569 Senior Member
    I have 'em, use 'em, love 'em. Saves a ton of gas, and time scouting.

    Right now I have two set up about a hundred yards apart, on the same trail. It's amazing to see different deer, and how few of them cross both cameras.
    Sadly, they've also told me that the buck I'm after doesn't frequent my hunting area during the day.
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    That works too. Just might be a little unsettling for the owners to find their dog in your yard writhing in pain. However, you are protecting your livestock. Just dont let them know that you baited the trap with a can of Alpo.


    When a 330 fires correctly, there is no writhing in pain.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • DurwoodDurwood Senior Member Posts: 970 Senior Member
    I've used trail timers and cameras on public land without issue. The public land area I hunt is remote, but I only hunt bow season and muzzleloader season on public ground and not all the time. I mainly hunt private ground.
    You have the right to your own opinion, but you don't have the right to your own facts:guns:
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