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Learning to run the mill, machinist help please

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  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,051 Senior Member
    And no.....if you need something really fine and clean, 1/4" won't get you there. 
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,684 Senior Member
    And no.....if you need something really fine and clean, 1/4" won't get you there. 
    What would you recommend?
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,051 Senior Member
    I can't really, without knowing the actual material, tool, speed, feed, and rigidity of the table/vise.


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,684 Senior Member
    The slide I think is 416R stainless. The table is pretty solid and I’m using a shars 4” cnc vise.

    im thinking I should start by chamfering the corners first then do the barrel cut outs.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,400 Senior Member
    timc said:
    tennmike said:
    Get started in some of their non gun projects and you'll become a 'machine shop hermit'! :D
    The wife will probably like me better if I do!
    Learn to turn brass candlesticks and she'll force you to stay out there making neat stuff! :D
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,684 Senior Member
    tennmike said:
    timc said:
    tennmike said:
    Get started in some of their non gun projects and you'll become a 'machine shop hermit'! :D
    The wife will probably like me better if I do!
    Learn to turn brass candlesticks and she'll force you to stay out there making neat stuff! :D
    She likes gold stuff but not brass.....

    Speaking of making stuff.......after several hours of youtube watching, soaking up all the great advice I have gotten, lots of practice and a few prayers I made my first for real cut. 

    This is definitely a learning experience that probably shouldn’t have started with stainless steel. The cut came out pretty nice, I have a lot of finish work and two more slot cuts to make, then cutting the serrations on the back of the slide but I can say I got one cut down!

    I am learning how difficult stainless is and how easy it is to damage end mills (broke 2 today) but I gained a lot of experience.


    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,400 Senior Member
    Stainless steel wouldn't have been my first choice for a first project piece, either. It's all dependent on the alloy as to what type of cutter you use. My automatic fallback cutter on SS is carbide end mills. High speed steel(HSS) will work on some SS, but on other alloys, HSS just won't do the job as the SS is HARD and will dull the end mill with the first touch of the cutter. On other SS alloys, the SS smears like butter and clogs the end mill teeth, and that causes clogging and breakage. Carbide and lube is the only answer, along with slow cuts, and you still have to watch for that smearing thing going on.

    With a little care and some slow machining that cutout can be cleaned up. And I'm about to honk off everyone on here that does machining work but I also have a favorite go-to lube for cutting. Kerosene and unsalted lard mixed to the proportions that make it the consistency of runny hand lotion. Brush it on with a small chip brush (1/4" cheap ones). It's both slick and catches and carries away chips for easy removal, and gets them out of the cutting area. Chip buildup in the cut is hell on end mills. Works well with lathe cuts, too. And when it gets hot it smells like bacon, so there's that, too.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,684 Senior Member
    tennmike said:
    Stainless steel wouldn't have been my first choice for a first project piece, either. It's all dependent on the alloy as to what type of cutter you use. My automatic fallback cutter on SS is carbide end mills. High speed steel(HSS) will work on some SS, but on other alloys, HSS just won't do the job as the SS is HARD and will dull the end mill with the first touch of the cutter. On other SS alloys, the SS smears like butter and clogs the end mill teeth, and that causes clogging and breakage. Carbide and lube is the only answer, along with slow cuts, and you still have to watch for that smearing thing going on.

    With a little care and some slow machining that cutout can be cleaned up. And I'm about to honk off everyone on here that does machining work but I also have a favorite go-to lube for cutting. Kerosene and unsalted lard mixed to the proportions that make it the consistency of runny hand lotion. Brush it on with a small chip brush (1/4" cheap ones). It's both slick and catches and carries away chips for easy removal, and gets them out of the cutting area. Chip buildup in the cut is hell on end mills. Works well with lathe cuts, too. And when it gets hot it smells like bacon, so there's that, too.
    This is all about learning and I definitely have a lot to do yet. I know I'm in over my head on this one but I think I'm doing ok despite. I do think I may need to turn slower and will adjust for my next cuts. May hit the sides tomorrow.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    I learned the lard trick a little over 50 years ago from an oldtimer who was using it as a drill press lube.  I think he was using automatic transmission fluid to dilute the stuff, and back then, Type A ATF still had some whale oil in it.   
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