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Saturday night special.

earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
edited June 2019 in Personal Defense #1
As the 1950's gives way to the next decade, a man owns a service station in Detroit Michigan. He's a good man that runs an honest business providing a needed service to his community. He has one employee and hires another. The second employee works exceptionally hard and earns advancements in pay and position surpassing the original employee. By random happenstance the shop owner and original employee are men of color while the new hire is caucasian. The original employee gets mad and is fired for hostile behavior towards the owner. Returning a short time later to commit violence against the owner and his new hire. He's immediately stopped in his tracks by a snub nose revolver quickly drawn from the owners cover alls pocket. Preventing escalation and injury to all involved.

Several years later a shop owner has his business repeatedly broke into and robbed. Instead of being forced out of business or the area he prepares himself for the challenges of reality. One evening he hears noise behind the shop. He investigates armed with a short barrel revolver only to discover two under age minors drinking beer. An understanding is reached and the youths seek a less contentious location.

Decades later a middle aged man lives in a neighborhood that is in decline. He feels threatened by people and circumstances beyond his power. So he keeps a small caliber revolver on him well doing yard work and close by well sleeping. Thus enabling him some small feeling of security to remain where he is until a change can be effected.

These stories are true. The people in them in need of the ability to immediately help  themselves and others around them when outside help is not immediately available. The small snub nose or short barreled revolver became an intricate contributor of good in businesses and homes across the country. Proving true the old adage and popular phrase of cinnema that a gun is a tool. No better or worse than any other tool. Its as good or bad as the person using it.

Replies

  • bisleybisley Senior Member East TexasPosts: 10,815 Senior Member
    Politicians that make their livings by promoting outrage cannot make much hay off of such a story, so they suppress them, or spin them so that employee number one is the victim. If a person can take care of himself, what does he need big government for?
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Alas;
    The pen may be mightier than the snub nose.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Many laws that came out of bad intentions are lauded by many as liberal panacea.  Ex. NYC gun laws which were born straight out of bigotry end elitism but that’s lost in the folks that somehow find them a cure for all evil in the city.  

    “Saturday Night Specials” have been used by many folks of meager means to protect themselves and their property for many decades until it was decided those folks do not need affordable firearms.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member East TexasPosts: 10,815 Senior Member
    Of course, let's not forget that the term "Saturday Night Special" grew out of the fact that some teenage gang members carried, and that low-level criminals used crappy revolvers or 'zip' guns for muggings and small-time hold-ups, on a somewhat regular basis.

    I always think of the RG .22 revolvers that you could buy for about $9, when I was a teenager, and the cheap smooth-bore .22 derringers that came from who knows where. I actually bought a used one, for $5, when I was 14 or 15. I owned it for about an hour, till my dad discovered it and made me return it. He told me that they were 'thug guns,' and that I should save up and buy something that would actually hit a target, and he would help me learn how to do that. It pissed me off, but he was right.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    Of course, let's not forget that the term "Saturday Night Special" grew out of the fact that some teenage gang members carried, and that low-level criminals used crappy revolvers or 'zip' guns for muggings and small-time hold-ups, on a somewhat regular basis.

    I always think of the RG .22 revolvers that you could buy for about $9, when I was a teenager, and the cheap smooth-bore .22 derringers that came from who knows where. I actually bought a used one, for $5, when I was 14 or 15. I owned it for about an hour, till my dad discovered it and made me return it. He told me that they were 'thug guns,' and that I should save up and buy something that would actually hit a target, and he would help me learn how to do that. It pissed me off, but he was right.
    I agree with your dad’s thinking wholeheartedly.  For those that know and appreciate firearms it’s almost sinful to spend any money on one of those types of guns.  But I do remember in my youth many of the local shopkeepers having those RG .22s under the counter.  These were not gun guys and those guns probably never got fired either in anger or even for practice.  They were just cheap insurance against an unruly customer or casual robber.  And the idea worked.

    How many folks have found those in grandmas drawer after she passed or inherited other types of inexpensive handguns from older relatives, usually accompanied with the original box of ammo purchased with the gun decades ago, missing only the rounds that are in the gun.

    Those inexpensive guns provided a level of protection and most important a measure of peace of mind to scores of folks in the old days when they were easy to acquire.  These folks neither desired or could afford the sexy stuff that sits in our nightstands.  But they certainly got a better night sleep because of them, and that is precious.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Similar to the Bulldog and its associated knock offs of the nineteenth century and the H&Rs and Iver Johnsons of the early twentieth century.

    Coat pockets, counter shelves, desk drawers, cookie jars, night stands, automobile glove boxes, tool boxes, tackle boxes, ladies hand bags, and maybe even a pair of old muddy boots by the door contained a potential life saving deterrent for the unexpected emergency.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    edited June 2019 #8
    Similar to the Bulldog and its associated knock offs of the nineteenth century and the H&Rs and Iver Johnsons of the early twentieth century.

    Coat pockets, counter shelves, desk drawers, cookie jars, night stands, automobile glove boxes, tool boxes, tackle boxes, ladies hand bags, and maybe even a pair of old muddy boots by the door contained a potential life saving deterrent for the unexpected emergency.
    Exactly!  If I had a dollar for every Iver Johnson I’ve been shown by a friend as Grandpa’s/Grandma’s nightstand drawer gun I could afford a nice dinner on that income stream.  Most of them have a nice stripe of rubbed off finish or rust on one or both sides of the cylinder from years of being shuffled around in said drawer and never having that cylinder rotate.

    Had one given to me with the firing pin ground off because Grandma wanted to make sure none of the kids ever had an accident with it.  It was just meant as a deterrent that would hopefully scare someone off without having to actually pull the trigger.  
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,309 Senior Member
    The term “Saturday night special” grew out of the racist term “N-word town Saturday night” implying that the guns were stolen and used by black people to shoot each other. 

    Almost all all gun control started off racist. 
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • bisleybisley Senior Member East TexasPosts: 10,815 Senior Member
    H&R and Iver Johnsons were 'real' revolvers that would fire every time and not break. I never heard anybody say they were 'nice,' or even accurate, but they were much better quality than the RG and some of those other no-names.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Some might be inclined to say that HiPoints have filled the nitch, but I think their larger size excludes them from the breed???
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    H&R and Iver Johnsons were 'real' revolvers that would fire every time and not break. I never heard anybody say they were 'nice,' or even accurate, but they were much better quality than the RG and some of those other no-names.
    By today standards they are actually pretty nice guns.  In their day they were an inexpensive alternative to the S&W and Colts the more we’ll heeled usually bought.  And yes they are better guns than Lorcins and Jennings.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Iver Johnson invented the transfer safety bar.

  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,309 Senior Member
    Some might be inclined to say that HiPoints have filled the nitch, but I think their larger size excludes them from the breed???

    https://www.sccy.com/product/cpx-2-tt-9mm/

    Street price of $179. 10 rounds of 9mm
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Some might be inclined to say that HiPoints have filled the nitch, but I think their larger size excludes them from the breed???

    https://www.sccy.com/product/cpx-2-tt-9mm/

    Street price of $179. 10 rounds of 9mm
    Even those are pretty well made compared to Bryco Jennings, Jiménez and such.  Again, they all fill a need somewhere.
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    While... I’m sorry but I had to. 
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,309 Senior Member
    Jennings?  I have one of those!


    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Jennings?  I have one of those!


    I see you tried to actually shoot it? 😁
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member crusted in sandPosts: 5,797 Senior Member
    I bought an SCCY a few years ago out of curiosity and it really is a well made gun. They are made in Florida and have an unconditional lifetime warranty and I have never had the first problem with it. Many years ago I had a Jennings .22 and it never successfully emptied a full five round magazine without at least one jam. My brother thought it was neat because of the size and I was happy to give it to him.

    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    I bought an SCCY a few years ago out of curiosity and it really is a well made gun. They are made in Florida and have an unconditional lifetime warranty and I have never had the first problem with it. Many years ago I had a Jennings .22 and it never successfully emptied a full five round magazine without at least one jam. My brother thought it was neat because of the size and I was happy to give it to him.

    It’s a fun balancing act between the recoil spring and striker spring to get them running right. They also have a tight coil on one end of the recoil spring that people don’t pay attention to and install backwards. It really messes them up.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member East TexasPosts: 10,815 Senior Member
    The only Jennings I ever watched someone try to shoot was a single shot. It had a completely dead mag spring, right out of the box.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,309 Senior Member
    The last time my Jennings fired, it was a slam fire as I chambered a round.  I would not feel safe selling or trading it to anyone, So I keep it in case I ever have a “buy back” in the area.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    The last time my Jennings fired, it was a slam fire as I chambered a round.  I would not feel safe selling or trading it to anyone, So I keep it in case I ever have a “buy back” in the area.
    I fired my little cracked frame Bersa today. Runs like a top. The slide releases from the jar of slammed home mag, but it don't fire without a trigger squeeze. I'll keep using it occasionally until there's an indication of trouble.
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