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New PR Bowfishing

N454casullN454casull MemberPosts: 564 Senior Member
Shot this carp yesterday on the Columbia River. Biggest carp I have taken to date. 
those are size 12 crocs. 

Replies

  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,295 Senior Member
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,397 Senior Member
    Ah, the infamous 'Bugle Mouth Bass'! :D That is a BIG one, too!  They're fun to go bowfishing for here, too. And for checking your accuracy, nothing beats trying to hit those skinny gar at 40 feet. Not a lot of room for error with gar, and they don't allow close approach here. 40 feet is about as close as you can get.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,038 Senior Member
    Nice fish.

    Caney Lake, in Northern Louisiana used to be THE trophy largemouth spot in the state. It started getting overgrown with hydrilla, and the DOW introduced carp into the lake to take care of the problem. They stocked it with 20,000 carp.

    That was a miscalculation on their part. Turned out, for the size of the lake it should have been 2,000. So.......the DOW was literally begging folks to take out carp by any means available, including bow fishing.

    That was when I learned I'm no archer.

    OTOH, I was able to hit the lake with 100% of my shots.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,714 Senior Member
    I used to hunt those and longnose gar.

    Best one shot was 2 about that size-----arrow pasted through and stuck in another.
    What fun getting them in as they each ran in different directions.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,916 Senior Member
    We have some really large ones down here also. Introduced to keep the grass in check, seems they forgot nothing eats them once they are no longer fry.  Never used a bow, but have had a blast chasing them up and down the canals on bass gear.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,495 Senior Member
    edited July 2019 #7
    Just an FYI, N454's fish is a common carp. And a nice one!

    The ones that eat grass are.... grass carp. In FL (and I presume elsewhere) they are hatchery-produced steriles. Usually triploids (1 1/2 times the normal chromosome number) to keep them from reproducing if they escape.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,916 Senior Member
    ^^^^^  Thank for the update, good to know they do not reproduce as there are a whole lot of very large ones around here
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 2,122 Senior Member
    That is a nice carp!  First time I looked at the first picture I missed the 2 in front of the 7.8 on the scale......thought it looked big for an under 8 lb. fish.  :D  27.8 lbs. is more like it.
    I pulled in this gar yesterday on the St. John's at Deep Creek.  Best behaved gar I have ever caught.  It quit struggling as soon as I got it in the boat, held still while I took the hook out and even posed for the picture  😁 ......but as soon as it touched the water when I released it, it was gone!


  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,495 Senior Member
    Diver43 said:
    ^^^^^  Thank for the update, good to know they do not reproduce as there are a whole lot of very large ones around here
    They pressure shock the eggs to make 'em triploid.

    Oh, and because they are a stocked fish for weed control they are illegal to harvest, if I remember correctly.  In private water bodies they are property of the person or group that stocked them. Plus you need a permit to possess them.

    Not illegal to catch and release. 
    Overkill is underrated.
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,295 Senior Member
    Hey Breamfisher,

    I've got a small stock pond (and I do mean small) that has been taken over by what I think is duckweed. Will the sterile carp clean it up? 


  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,495 Senior Member
    Grass carp aren't my strong suit. From what i've read, they will eat duckweed, but it's not preferred. Best bet would be to contact your state's ag extension office, game agency, or something like that. I would be willing to bet you need a permit and maybe an inspection to make sure they can't get out into a lake or river.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • N454casullN454casull Member Posts: 564 Senior Member
    All we can shoot legally is common carp.

    There’s a couple lakes on the west side of the state with grass carp in them and they did, one time, open it up to reduce numbers but other than that grass carp are off limits. 

    That fish is pretty dang big for around here but not even close to what they shoot in southern Idaho. I saw some bigger ones but couldn’t get a shot on them if I can get one in the mid 30’s that will be a freaking monster. 
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,495 Senior Member
    Some areas folks like to fly fish for them.

    Both grass and common carp.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,038 Senior Member
    I'm not a grass carp expert, but from what I saw in Louisiana, they don't seem to pay much attention to duckweed.

    Other grasses, that's a different story. Two years after Caney Lake was grossly overstocked with them there wasn't a blade of grass within 10 feet of the shoreline. That area looked like an underwater beach. Caney went from being a gem to a practical dead zone.

    Maybe it's rebounded in the 15 years I've been gone, but it was in sad shape when I left.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,495 Senior Member
    I think eating duckweed depends on what grasses are there.

    As far as wiping out all the vegetation... yeah. They can do that. Even going so far as to beach themselves to eat lawn grass.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,038 Senior Member
    One thing I recall about the Caney Lake fiasco.......

    The lady biologist in charge of the project was related to the guy in Mississipi who raised grass carp commercially for just such endeavors.

    I don't know what, if anything, came of that. I left the state about the time that info became public. Shannon Hayes might know....he lives about 20 miles from Caney.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,793 Senior Member
    Can you eat those?  I’m no expert on fresh water fish.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,165 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    Can you eat those?  I’m no expert on fresh water fish.
    Yes. But like a pike there is a certain way to clean them to get all of the bones out.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,397 Senior Member

    jbp-ohio said:
    GunNut said:
    Can you eat those?  I’m no expert on fresh water fish.
    Yes. But like a pike there is a certain way to clean them to get all of the bones out.
    Quality, as in TASTE, depends on where they are caught. If taken from a muddy bottom lake or river, they are a LOT better if they are 'cleaned out' by putting them in a small stock tank and feeding them fish food for a couple of weeks. The ones caught in cold rocky bottomed rivers and streams don't require that clean out period.
    And like JBP said, they do require a lot of work when cleaning to fillet out the meat from the bones, like pike. They aren't bad as to taste, but I'd rather have a mess of fried bluegill, myself. :)
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,038 Senior Member
    Best way to clean a carp (or buffalo, a species of carp) is to skin it, then tear the meat off the bones in large chunks with your fingers. It's not pretty, but for some reason this method of cleaning allows those feather bones to dissolve when fried hot. The large bones, spine and ribs will still be there.

    As to taste, that's a matter for each to decide. As a kid I ate plenty of both and enjoyed it. After not having it for 15 years, trying it as an adult it was all I could do to choke it down. But as a kid, I liked even mud cats.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,658 Senior Member
    You do know how to cook a carp?
    Skin and fillet the fish, lay on a pine board and apply spices of choice. Cook in oven till done.
    Take fish from board throw it away and eat the pine board.
  • N454casullN454casull Member Posts: 564 Senior Member
    Around here they are muddy bottom feeders. I would never eat one. But I don’t really like much fish anyway. 
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,714 Senior Member
    I ate smoked carp once-------too greasy for me.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    That’s a biggun’, for sure
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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