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MY RANT Working on my truck today

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  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,934 Senior Member
    One of the few things I remember about vapor lock, other than it's a PITA when it happens, is that some would clamp a wooden clothes line pin to the fuel line to prevent it.  I'm not sure of the reasoning behind that, but it didn't work on the old truck I used to drive.  The truck was a very old ice cream delivery truck that I drove during my summer job back in the late 60s.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,859 Senior Member
    edited August 2019 #33
    zorba said:
    Ok, great. I learned something today - although mechanical pumps can be made to supply any pressure needed, diesels have been doing it for a very long time. But whatever - still no excuse to cheap out and put it inside the gas tank as I see it.
    Only got vapor locked once...


    The mechanical pumps on diesels also cost over $1000 in many cases.  Electric fuel pumps are cheap in comparison.  On the diesels that Jay was mentioning, the electric pump in the tank is to supply fuel to the mechanical pump on the engine.  The early 24V Cummins had a Bosch VP44 pump, which is a diaphragm pump.  If not supplied with around 5-8 PSI to the VP44, it would rupture the diaphragm, killing the pump. And those electric pumps were known to go bad.  Which is exactly what happened to my dad's truck and why I ended up putting a new VP44 and the same FASS system Jay mentioned on that truck.  Not a single problem since then.  But it cost over $2000 to put that fuel system on that truck.  And that was just the cost for parts.

    For a gas engine, a mechanical pump is heavy and expensive.  A couple of reasons for having the pumps in the tank is, for one, it helps them stay cooler being submerged in fuel, so they last longer.  Second, electric pumps push a lot better than they pull.  The high pressure used on EFI system can require 50PSI+, which can heat a pump up and cause more wear.  As much of a pain as they can be, it's probably the best option for what is needed.

    I spent 1/2 the day Saturday putting a new fuel level sensor in my '15 Dodge. Had to drop the tank, of course.  Not a fun job.  But it cost me $126 for the part and a few hours work.  I don't even want to know what the dealership would have charged me for that.  They probably would have tried to get me to replace the whole pump assembly instead of just the sensor.  The pump assembly is over $600 alone, before labor.

  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,654 Senior Member
    Interesting - I learned something today.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    Gila said:
    zorba said:
    I never understood why somebody thought putting a wear part INSIDE the gas tank was a good idea - like most other ideas on newer cars. Who started this nonsense? I want to blame GM, but I really don't know...
    They stick them in the tanks to cool the fuel pumps.  It's one of the reasons not to ever run out of gas, because doing so can burn up a fuel pump.
    So they can save $1.50 in copper costs to make it right the first time. ASS-U-ME-ing they just can't use a mechanical pump. Sigh.... That *had* to be GM, they always seem to be the first to figure out a way to cheapen the product.
    I just replaced the Arrington high performance fuel pump on my ride, because 60 PSI wasn't enough.  I installed a Fore Innovations duel pump system, and things appear to be functioning much better now.  It isn't done to save money, it's done to improve performance...
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,654 Senior Member
    Just seems to me that if they used more copper in the pump, it would run cool enough to located in a more sane location. *shrug*
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 4,265 Senior Member
    When engines were simple ..... any one could work on them ..... now you need a computer & some expensive tools to get the job done . I have been thinking about adding an electric fuel pump to my side by side . Will need to do some looking   before I buy one & try it . The guy that owned had some real cobble work done on it . Those are fun to find a problem on .
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,158 Senior Member
    One of the few things I remember about vapor lock, other than it's a PITA when it happens, is that some would clamp a wooden clothes line pin to the fuel line to prevent it.  I'm not sure of the reasoning behind that, but it didn't work on the old truck I used to drive.  The truck was a very old ice cream delivery truck that I drove during my summer job back in the late 60s.
    To keep the gas from draining backwards into the gas tank and leaving air in the line. The fuel pump pumps liquid well........ air? Not so much.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    jaywapti said:
    So being completely honest here, having been a mechanic for most of my life and having all the knowledge and tools needed to do the job, and being on a fixed income, if I can save the labor rate of $100. an hour I still do it myself, granted I old and slow but I can still get the job done.

    JAY
    I, for one, appreciate your 'hard-headedness,' still doing the things that were once easy for you, even though they now take a heavy physical toll on you. I've been experiencing some of the same, lately, fixing all of the old run-down machines I have accumulated during the last forty years.

    At 68 (in a couple of months), I am a spring chicken, by comparison to you, but unlike you, I let my lack of physical stamina sideline me for the last 15 years. But, after losing a hundred pounds, I have been doing the stuff that I did routinely for much of my life, but that had just became too hard for me, the last few years. It's much more painful than it used to be, and it takes me 10 times as long, but I feel like a man, again, and that makes the pain worthwhile. If I drop dead doing it, the only thing I'll regret is that I didn't get it all done, first.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Bisley
    Glad ya lost 100 lbs. ya gotta be feeling better, one thing I have learned as we get older we have to keep active both our body and mind, and any physical work we do does take 10X longer, often my mind says I can do it, the body says who are you kidding, at that point i say I'm gonna try it anyhow and usually end up doing it.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • mosseybuckmosseybuck Member Posts: 524 Senior Member
    I like your attitude Jay. I'm only a couple of years behind you. I've been a paid mechanic a few times but have done most all of my own mechanic work since I was a teen, cars, boats, whatever. I can not remember the last time I paid someone else to work on anything I've owned. It does get a little more difficult as I age. That's just part of aging.
    USMC '59-'65, NRA Lifer, Tennessee Squire
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