Home Main Category Clubhouse

Cigar smokers?

FFLshooterFFLshooter MemberPosts: 1,057 Senior Member
Any here? I used to enjoy a good cigar every now and then a few years ago and can’t remember why in the world I ever stopped but decided to pick it back up a week or so ago. I know most people only smoke them on rare occasions and whatnot but I like to overdue bad things 😆 and go for about 2-3 a day. I’ve tried all kinds of brands and types but (here comes the pitchforks and torches) I actually really enjoy the flavored Backwoods cigars. I ordered some Cuban knockoffs from some website where they had a 4.5 of 5 star review but they are bland and have no flavor to me. Waste of money. Any recommendations?
«1

Replies

  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Not a true cigar smoker, but there is 2 I really like, A friend turned me on to Montecristo Robusto ( no I cant afford them)  and my favorite, cheap Rum Soaked Crooks.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    I'm not a cigar smoker, but the Habanas are great!  They're available in Canada, but don't try to bring them into the US; just smoke them while you're there.
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,905 Senior Member
    Gila said:
    I'm not a cigar smoker, but the Habanas are great!  They're available in Canada, but don't try to bring them into the US; just smoke them while you're there.
    You can now bring them into the US, I believe up to 100.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,905 Senior Member
    I have a few cigars a month. My go to is Perdomo Lot 23, followed by most anything by Arturo Fuente. For boutiques Room 101 is hard to beat
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    Diver43 said:
    I have a few cigars a month. My go to is Perdomo Lot 23, followed by most anything by Arturo Fuente. For boutiques Room 101 is hard to beat
    Yeah my buddy here screwed me up by amping my love for Perdomos.  I have a cigar once or twice a month.  Usually first thing in the morning sitting in my yard with a HUGE cup of traditional Cafe con Leche.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • AccipiterAccipiter New Member Posts: 885 Senior Member
    edited August 2019 #7
    I will be lighting an Aging Room cigar tonight.  Those and La flor double legero chisels are my current favorites.  Add to that a glass of Oban 14 yr on Ice and I will call that and evening.
    Apparently free thought is punished, and conformity is required, while peckerless cowards run the show.

    ECHO...ECHO....echo...

    Ah......One savors the hypocrisy!

    Karma.........It’s a bitch.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,030 Senior Member
    If you think cigars are confusing, try a pipe. Nothing that tastes good in one pipe tastes good in another.  

    I should switch to cigars.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    As of lately I’ve just been experimenting with different brands to see what I like best. It’s a rare balance between taste, aroma and price. I hate to admit it that the cheap Backwoods are winning so far. 
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,733 Senior Member
    I smoke one about every two weeks.  A CAO Maduro Le'Anniversair (sp) Rubosto  cigar.  The cigars in the red box, not at all like the Rubustos in the brown box.They're robust and tasty, but I wouldn't be able to afford them once a day.  They're a moderately priced cigar if you buy them by the box.  Individually, at a cigar store, way too expensive.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    I smoke one about every two weeks.  A CAO Maduro Le'Anniversair (sp) Rubosto  cigar.  The cigars in the red box, not at all like the Rubustos in the brown box.They're robust and tasty, but I wouldn't be able to afford them once a day.  They're a moderately priced cigar if you buy them by the box.  Individually, at a cigar store, way too expensive.
    An excellent smoke.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    If you think cigars are confusing, try a pipe. Nothing that tastes good in one pipe tastes good in another.  

    I should switch to cigars.

    Mike
    I smoke pipes, and I've never experienced that, but then, I only smoke one tobacco period. 
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 838 Senior Member
    Gila said:
    I only smoke one tobacco period.  
    What are you smoking? I've not tried a huge selection of pipe tobacco but Carter Hall is my firm favourite.
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 838 Senior Member
    edited August 2019 #14
    As of lately I’ve just been experimenting with different brands to see what I like best. It’s a rare balance between taste, aroma and price. I hate to admit it that the cheap Backwoods are winning so far. 
    I like a cigar, Romeo y Julieta #2 are my favourite, when I can find one, which I can do next to never....
    Cheap and cheerful normally carries the day for me as well, in my case they're Schimmelpenninck Panatellas in the 5 pack, love to have couple whilst doing yard work or when I'm on the job.

    I'll add that Toscano Classico's are good and cheap too, strong enough to walk away by themselves.
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    waipapa13 said:
    Gila said:
    I only smoke one tobacco period.  
    What are you smoking? I've not tried a huge selection of pipe tobacco but Carter Hall is my firm favourite.
    Lane Limited -1-Q
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 838 Senior Member
    Gila said:
    waipapa13 said:
    Lane Limited -1-Q
    Ta, I'll try and find some.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,030 Senior Member
    I'm not much a fan of flavored tobaccos, 5100 Red Cake being my favorite, but since McClellend's shut down there's not much good mature Virginia to choose from. So....

    In lieu of.....Erik Stokkebye's 4th Generation 1982 Centennial blend is a good one, with only a faint hint of berry. It's mostly real tobacco.

    Lane Ltd. Black Raspberry is pretty good, too. And that's from a guy who doesn't like "flavored" tobaccos.

    If you like berry flavored, try Dan's "Devil's Holiday", if you can find it. It's pure Soviet stronk-berry, and it'll ghost a pipe to death. But, if you really like berry....there you go,

    Mike


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    waipapa13 said:
    Gila said:
    waipapa13 said:
    Lane Limited -1-Q
    Ta, I'll try and find some.
    Tinderbox sells it as Wilshire, but they're expensive.
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    edited August 2019 #19
    If you think cigars are confusing, try a pipe. Nothing that tastes good in one pipe tastes good in another.  

    I should switch to cigars.

    Mike
    So what is the secret to finding a pipe/tobacco combo that smells good AND tastes good?  I have tried a lot of pipes and tobaccos over the years but it seems like it’s one or the other.  Some pipe tobaccos smell amazing and wife loves the aroma, BUT they taste like hell.  Maybe I’m using the wrong pipes or smoking them wrong (too hot)?  I know there is absolutely a learning curve to smoking a cigar successfully.  Smoke it too hot and you’ll ruin the flavor and your mouth will feel like crap.  Light it wrong and you have the same effect.  Is it the same with pipes.  Will I need a few afternoons with someone that knows what they are doing to learn?  Do different types of pipes smoke differently?  Any style better than others?  Sorry for all the questions, it’s a subject that I have been curious about for a long time and since you brought it up...

    Cigars are easy!  Learn to light and smoke them right and then find the ones you like and what they go best with like coffee, cognac, whiskey, rum, after dinner liqueurs and such.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    Completely agree about smoking and lighting a cigar wrong (obviously not in that order lol). It’ll ruin the thing in a heartbeat. Still haven’t learned how to relight one without making it hot and taste like crap either. I did just order a nice cedar humidor that has a 5 of 5 star rating, so I’m hoping that helps store them properly. I understand that has a learning curve as well.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,905 Senior Member
    Completely agree about smoking and lighting a cigar wrong (obviously not in that order lol). It’ll ruin the thing in a heartbeat. Still haven’t learned how to relight one without making it hot and taste like crap either. I did just order a nice cedar humidor that has a 5 of 5 star rating, so I’m hoping that helps store them properly. I understand that has a learning curve as well.
    I have a nice humidor that does OK, but for long term storage Tupperware or a cooler and Boveda packs can not be beat and is safest for your sticks
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,030 Senior Member
    Gun Nut.....

    A good pipe, (and I mean a good pipe) starts you in the right direction. Expect to spend ~$150-$200 for a good one, although, with a lot of luck, some considerably cheaper may surprise you. Good luck finding them.

    I've never had bad luck with Peterson's, which can be pricey. I've had terrible luck with Preban Holms, which cost the same (if you can find them), but there's a difference between a talented woodcarver and a pipemaker, Preban Holms being the former. Peterson.....always my first choice after making several mistakes (usually after erring on the "cheaper" side).

    Tobacco....well....that's a different story. It's a fact of life that nothing that smells "right" in the bag is going to taste like that once you fire it up. It's going to have a different "room note" , and it's not going to taste anything like you expected, unless you went with a heavily flavored (read..."enhanced") tobacco to start with. That's akin to lighting up a Tootsie-Pop and sucking on it.

    My current favorites are Erik Stokkebyes 4th Generation 1982 Centennial. (Very light berry flavor, almost unnoticible). Lane Blackraspberry, Again, mostly real tobacco, with only a hint of berry flavor, and Sutlifff's match for McCllends 5100 Red Cake. (McCllend closed shop a few months ago, so Sutliff is the nearest match I've found. The Red Cake match is not flavored. It's pretty good stuff.

    HTH.

    Mike


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    Gun Nut.....

    A good pipe, (and I mean a good pipe) starts you in the right direction. Expect to spend ~$150-$200 for a good one, although, with a lot of luck, some considerably cheaper may surprise you. Good luck finding them.

    I've never had bad luck with Peterson's, which can be pricey. I've had terrible luck with Preban Holms, which cost the same (if you can find them), but there's a difference between a talented woodcarver and a pipemaker, Preban Holms being the former. Peterson.....always my first choice after making several mistakes (usually after erring on the "cheaper" side).

    Tobacco....well....that's a different story. It's a fact of life that nothing that smells "right" in the bag is going to taste like that once you fire it up. It's going to have a different "room note" , and it's not going to taste anything like you expected, unless you went with a heavily flavored (read..."enhanced") tobacco to start with. That's akin to lighting up a Tootsie-Pop and sucking on it.

    My current favorites are Erik Stokkebyes 4th Generation 1982 Centennial. (Very light berry flavor, almost unnoticible). Lane Blackraspberry, Again, mostly real tobacco, with only a hint of berry flavor, and Sutlifff's match for McCllends 5100 Red Cake. (McCllend closed shop a few months ago, so Sutliff is the nearest match I've found. The Red Cake match is not flavored. It's pretty good stuff.

    HTH.

    Mike


    Absolutely correct about the pipes, and they must be a quality briar.  I've found that the thicker the bowl, the cooler they burn.  Quality briar pipes are not heavy to hold, while cheaper pipes can be.  Mine are all freehand, my favorite being Ben Wade, which are no longer available, and Nording.  One of the things about selecting a pipe is the bite on the stem.  They can be very different, and it's entirely a personal preference.

    The tobacco I smoke (1-Q) is a mild aromatic black Cavendish, Cavendish, Virginia blend, it is not flavored and has been my favorite for over 45 years.  BTW, I have tried many, many different tobaccos from all over Europe and the US.  One thing not mentioned is that burning tobacco will smell different when you are smoking it from when someone else is smoking the same tobacco.


    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    Gun Nut.....

    A good pipe, (and I mean a good pipe) starts you in the right direction. Expect to spend ~$150-$200 for a good one, although, with a lot of luck, some considerably cheaper may surprise you. Good luck finding them.

    I've never had bad luck with Peterson's, which can be pricey. I've had terrible luck with Preban Holms, which cost the same (if you can find them), but there's a difference between a talented woodcarver and a pipemaker, Preban Holms being the former. Peterson.....always my first choice after making several mistakes (usually after erring on the "cheaper" side).

    Tobacco....well....that's a different story. It's a fact of life that nothing that smells "right" in the bag is going to taste like that once you fire it up. It's going to have a different "room note" , and it's not going to taste anything like you expected, unless you went with a heavily flavored (read..."enhanced") tobacco to start with. That's akin to lighting up a Tootsie-Pop and sucking on it.

    My current favorites are Erik Stokkebyes 4th Generation 1982 Centennial. (Very light berry flavor, almost unnoticible). Lane Blackraspberry, Again, mostly real tobacco, with only a hint of berry flavor, and Sutlifff's match for McCllends 5100 Red Cake. (McCllend closed shop a few months ago, so Sutliff is the nearest match I've found. The Red Cake match is not flavored. It's pretty good stuff.

    HTH.

    Mike


    Thanks for the thorough explanation!  When it comes to cigars the fastest way to kill a good cigar is to draw through it when lighting (something I see a lot of folks do) specially when you have big flames coming off the end as you puff, because it overheats the tobacco in the body of the cigar giving you a burnt taste of carbon through the whole stick.  A cigar will taste 100x better if you hold a flame to the tip until a thin layer of ash forms uniformly around and then just start smoking normally without over puffing to get the huge smoke some folks want but really you don't need.

    I feel like like lighting a pipe also burns the tobacco all the way through but I'm probably doing it wrong but I do not see an alternative.  Is there a correct way to do this?  Maybe draw more gently?
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,030 Senior Member
    edited August 2019 #25
    Pack the bowl in stages. Fill the pipe about a quarter way, then tamp relatively lightly. Then fill the bowl about two thirds up tamping a bit heavier. Top off the bowl (I prefer to keep it ~ an eighth inch below the rim before the final tamping. Tamp the last load down pretty hard, but not so hard that you can't comfortably draw it. (A clear draw is the key ingredient to a good smoke, hence not tamping too hard on the first pack nearest the orifice. That's like trying to suck down a McDonald's shake with a chunk of crushed ice stuck in the bottom of the straw).

    Lighting is done in two stages. Apply the flame evenly over the tobacco....a slow circular motion over the whole tobacco area seems to work best. Once it's lit, stop lighting. You'll see your last pack "rise". (it actually does rise, like baked biscuits). Puff this gently until it goes out. This does not take long at all. You will have a slight layer of ash on top, which you can either gently dump out, or gently tamp down. Either works, though lately I seem to do more of the latter.

    Now fire that puppy up. Your second light won't produce a "rise", and you're now actually smoking a pipe instead of trying to light it.

    Don't be afraid to occasionally dump ash, tamp, or even use your pipe tools' "pick" to keep the passage to the stem hole clear. The internet is full of old bards that claim they can go 7 minutes between draws and their pipe is still lit. These are the same guys that kill deer at 700 yards with GrandDad's '94 with irons....in the rain. Unless I'm puffing, I plan on relighting every 2 minutes or so, depending on the moisture content of the tobacco.

    Which brings up another small point. Most tobacco when purchased is too wet to provide an easy smoke. There are exceptions, but IME, a day or two of open air drying hurts nothing and improves greatly. (You can always re-humidify if necessary, but sucking on a wet smoke....sucks).

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    Interesting. I learned quite a bit about cigars and pipes. Didn’t know there was so much science to both subjects. The lighting portion that Gunnut explained makes sense as to why I’ve had “hot” cigars and others that were perfect.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,030 Senior Member
    It seems like a lot of science, but once you've found what works and have done it a dozen times, it's second nature and not much to it. I didn't know about first light "rise" and its' importance until it was explained to me. I'd been doing it wrong for decades, and would have never figured it out on my own.

    That's why we're here. For guns....or other.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    Mike you are da’man!!!!!  I KNEW there had to be a right way of doing it because mine sucked!  My wife is going to be REALLY pissed when I tell her I now need a $150 pipe 🤣🤣🤣

    Thanks!

    Do do you have to “cure” or brake-in a pipe or does it smoke ok from day one?  I’ve heard conflicting opinions on this too.  And if so does it involve juggling rodents?  

    There will probably be more questions to follow after I get to digest this info if you don’t mind.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    Interesting. I learned quite a bit about cigars and pipes. Didn’t know there was so much science to both subjects. The lighting portion that Gunnut explained makes sense as to why I’ve had “hot” cigars and others that were perfect.
    I’ve reintroduced cigar smoking to many folks that told me they hated the taste.  I know the second they told me their mouths hurt after a cigar or that the stuff tasted burnt they just never got instructed on smoking a cigar properly.  

    The body of a cigar is a heat sink that allows the smoke to cool before reaching your mouth.  That’s why long/fat cigars smoke better.  Also on a fat cigar the maker gets to blend more types of leaves to balance the smoke better.  You draw/smoke a cigar gently enough to keep it cool as long as you can.  The volume of smoke is almost immaterial, only the taste is important.

    Another thing most folks don’t know is that every once in a while, I like after every other puff, you should gently blow through a lit cigar.  It clears the inside off the smoke that did not make it to your mouth so It does not get stale inside the cigar and deposit extra tar/carbon on the remaining filler leaf.  It keeps the cigar cooler and the smoke fresher longer.  You can smoke a cigar down to a nub that way.  Otherwise it starts tasting “bad” about halfway down the body.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,778 Senior Member
    And last but not least.  Never light a cigar with a freshly lit match or lighter.  Wait a few seconds until the head burn off the match or the lighter is burning hot without the chemical smell to the fuel.  The best way to light a cigar is with a grain alcohol flame from an alcohol lamp (my preferred method indoors) and second best is a wind proof butane torch.  Neither adds to the cigar any unwanted tastes.

    I know that this might seem a little crazy to some but with the price of some cigars approaching 3 figures (none other of those in my home humidor currently) you want to be sure you get the most out of the experience and screwing up a great cigar with a .02 cent match is a sin 🤬
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,030 Senior Member
    "Breaking in a pipe" is kind of like breaking in a barrel.Some believe, and some don't. I'm in the middle. A good pipe doesn't smoke really well on it's first bowl. A poor pipe never smokes well at all. But a good pipe is usually good by its third bowl. A bad pipe is gonna suck forever, and there's not much man or God can do to change that. (Hint....Peterson...spend the money....trust me, brother....).

    What Gila said about thicker bowls is spot on. While in the early days, I prefered a smaller bowl, simply for comfort in the hand, a thicker bowl provides a much cooler smoke and packs a bit more tobacco....you'll grow into it.

    I will disagree with Gila one on slight point. A brier pipe isn't the end all. Well, yes it is, but briar pipes "ghost" considerably, meaning the last tobacco you've smoked in it will "flavor" or contiminate the next few you try.

    A Meershaum is good for this. I don't like them for purely smoking, but.....they don't ghost. A Meershaum is a great device for finding a smoke you like. They don' ghost when cleaned, or hold a residue like a briar.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement