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  • zorbazorba Senior Member Merrritt Island, FLPosts: 25,219 Senior Member
    Wow. There is NO local gov't agency more corrupt than a planning/building department. Universal rule.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Eupora, MSPosts: 2,814 Senior Member
    That's another benefit of living in a rural area.  I can do whatever I want to my house whenever I want to. No permit. No building inspectors. 
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member
    I can do the same, but if I wanna sell the place someday I need to be code compliant if the buyer is borrowing from a bank. 

    This is free market fix...no government required. 
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Podunk, Tx.Posts: 8,227 Senior Member

    I know a couple who lived on 3 acres near Kalispiel, Mt.  They loved it.  They had a nice house and built a barn on the property.  Then, they decided to sell and move to Colorado to help with their grand kids.

    They didn't really want to move, but felt it was what they needed to do.

    But, to make matters worse, when they sold their place in Montana zoning laws would not allow a house and a barn on the acreage they had.  They had to tear down the barn in order to sell the house.

    How's that for government over reach?

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member

    I know a couple who lived on 3 acres near Kalispiel, Mt.  They loved it.  They had a nice house and built a barn on the property.  Then, they decided to sell and move to Colorado to help with their grand kids.

    They didn't really want to move, but felt it was what they needed to do.

    But, to make matters worse, when they sold their place in Montana zoning laws would not allow a house and a barn on the acreage they had.  They had to tear down the barn in order to sell the house.

    How's that for government over reach?

    I get what you're saying, but it isn't gov't overreach. This was written into the code prior to your friends' building the barn. They should've looked into the zoning laws prior to building the barn.

    A few years ago I had a shop built. The the zoning codes were maddening, but following the regulations gave me relief from future BS if/when I want to sell. 

    Now ask me if I've pulled permits for any work done inside the structures.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • zorbazorba Senior Member Merrritt Island, FLPosts: 25,219 Senior Member
    CaliFFL said:

    I get what you're saying, but it isn't gov't overreach. This was written into the code prior to your friend's building the barn. They should've looked into the zoning laws prior to building the barn.
    Of course it's gov't overreach. Just because they can make laws doesn't mean they're ethical. With that said, you're right: They should have looked at the zoning laws - but how did this come to light when they sold?
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    CaliFFL said:

    I get what you're saying, but it isn't gov't overreach. This was written into the code prior to your friend's building the barn. They should've looked into the zoning laws prior to building the barn.
    Of course it's gov't overreach. Just because they can make laws doesn't mean they're ethical. With that said, you're right: They should have looked at the zoning laws - but how did this come to light when they sold?
    I never said ethical...I said in the code. You know my opinions of laws and law enforcement...but I still comply for the most part. Especially zoning BS. You can't hide a barn or be discreet with a runway. You will get caught when you sell.  

    Back to Jerry's friends...I assume there was an inspection by either the county or the buyer's bank. I can't speak for Montana, but in Idaho, a buyer with cash can buy "at risk or as is" and all the code violations are passed onto him/her. This is not applicable with a bank loan. The bank wants the property to be correct and intact. 


    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Eupora, MSPosts: 2,814 Senior Member
    I can build whatever structure I want. There are no statewide or county zoning laws saying I have to have a minimum acreage for multiple buildings. 
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member
    I can do the same. But if I want sell and stuff isn’t to code I’ll have problems. Or if one of the outbuildings burns down the insurance won’t cover the loss. Not sure what happens if the house burns down in this situation. 

    No laws in place but there are possible repercussions for ignoring the codes. 
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Eupora, MSPosts: 2,814 Senior Member
    I understand about codes such as electrical, plumbing, etc.

    I don't understand why Montana cares if a person has a house and a barn on 3 acres. 
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member
    I don’t know either. It’s possible the barn is too close to the house. Fire code violation...only thing I can think of. 
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


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