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Quartering a hog and never gutting it

Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior MemberPosts: 2,273 Senior Member
ok, I’d never seen this before. My youngest son brought a work buddy out to hunt hogs and his buddies dad drove down from KS. His dad is an OR nurse. He knows his anatomy.

He got a 110 lb hog yesterday evening. They brought it up to the barn and hung it from the tractor bucket. I watched in amazement as he skinned the hog down to the neck. He completely quartered the hog and took the back straps without gutting. He didn’t want the ribs. Once done my son and his son took the intact body cavity to the bone yard as we call it. 

He said deer deer were much easier to than hogs. I’m honing to try this on my next deer or hog. 
Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

John 3: 1-21

Replies

  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,536 Senior Member
    I've never tried that myself, but I used to work with a guy that always used that method on whitetail. Amazing. From complete "hide-on" deer to "in the ice chest" in about 10 minutes...including the backstrap.

    An aside....told me he learned that method trying to stay a step ahead of the game wardens. Funny thing, though.....he once got 200 hours of community service for jack-lighting rabbits. :D

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,848 Senior Member
    Ive tried it with elk. Its a good system. The problem for me was trying to move the quarted ungutted carcass around by myself to access as much meat as possible. I just wasn't strong enough to complete the task efficiently. So I abandoned the system after one trial. If I was stronger or had assistance, I'd be fully on board.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    I've done that with deer quite a few times, specially nice with gut shot animals since you don't have to deal with the mess.  It is FAST and efficient, even more so in warm weather.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 26,085 Senior Member
    edited November 2019 #5
    I’ve done that before. Not really my preferred method as it wastes more meat than I’m willing to discard. 

    Heart/liver/kidneys
    Deboned Ribs (for grind)
    Abdominal Muscle (for grind)
    Tenderloin (can be removed that way just tedious)

    I can gut a deer/pig in less than a minute. Doesn’t save me much time. 

    About the only way I would use that method now days would be on a gut shot deer where I didn’t want to play in the innards. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,687 Senior Member
    Do you toss the tenderloins with the guts?  Those are the best cuts... in a deer at least. 


    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,673 Senior Member
    We have done that with deer in the field, right where they dropped....packed out the meat and left the rest for the coyotes...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Do you toss the tenderloins with the guts?  Those are the best cuts... in a deer at least. 


    Yep, can’t get to them this way.  But again on gut shot deer (I had some friends that did that a lot  :s) it’s a worthwhile sacrifice to leave those for the coyotes since they are tainted anyway.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,205 Senior Member
    edited November 2019 #9
    I am going to start a thread in the Clubhouse in the next couple days regarding meat and veggie stock. I can get 2 1/2- 3 gallons of venison stock from one deer carcass, plus I use the shanks as meaty soup bones. If you are in a CWD area, you will want to freeze your bones until testing comes back negative, but otherwise, you can make stock and then pressure can or freeze it for later.

    Anyway, with the bones, vegetable peels, and other stuff that gets thrown away, I can make some amazing food!
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,536 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    Do you toss the tenderloins with the guts?  Those are the best cuts... in a deer at least. 


    Yep, can’t get to them this way.  But again on gut shot deer (I had some friends that did that a lot  :s) it’s a worthwhile sacrifice to leave those for the coyotes since they are tainted anyway.
    Gonna disagree a little here. I wasn't watching close enough to see how he did it (beer was involved), but he had backstraps when finished. A tad shorter than what you'd get from a chest entry, but probably 90% intact.

    Mike 
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 26,085 Senior Member
    I’ve taken the tenders out with that method. 

    Remove the backstraps first. Then, slightly open the abdominal cavity just below the spine and next to the tenders. Ain’t the easiest removal. But, it works. 

    At that point, I’ve learned I’d just as soon gut the damn thing. But, it can be done. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,536 Senior Member
    Zee said:

    At that point, I’ve learned I’d just as soon gut the damn thing. But, it can be done. 
    When you get down to the nut cuttin' (pun intended), I agree.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,755 Senior Member
    I am going to start a thread in the Clubhouse in the next couple days regarding meat and veggie stock. I can get 2 1/2- 3 gallons of venison stock from one deer carcass, plus I use the shanks as meaty soup bones. If you are in a CWD area, you will want to freeze your bones until testing comes back negative, but otherwise, you can make stock and then pressure can or freeze it for later.

    Anyway, with the bones, vegetable peels, and other stuff that gets thrown away, I can make some amazing food!
    You certainly can and do.  With only the two of us in the house we dont do much canning and such. Wife cooks a meal, we eat and have leftovers for lunch. Might need to rethink home made stock though
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    Do you toss the tenderloins with the guts?  Those are the best cuts... in a deer at least. 


    Yep, can’t get to them this way.  But again on gut shot deer (I had some friends that did that a lot  :s) it’s a worthwhile sacrifice to leave those for the coyotes since they are tainted anyway.
    Gonna disagree a little here. I wasn't watching close enough to see how he did it (beer was involved), but he had backstraps when finished. A tad shorter than what you'd get from a chest entry, but probably 90% intact.

    Mike 
    Backstraps absolutely yes.  The tenderloins are under the ribs.  You CAN get to them as Zee pointed out but it's work and again if tainted by a gut shot why bother.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,536 Senior Member
    Missed terminology. I meant tenderloin (AKA Preachers' meat.....best cut....served on Sunday when the preacher comes to visit). They can be taken out, but I wasn't watching closely enough to see how it was done. I can imagine how to do it, but it seems like a real pain, although my coworker made no big deal of it.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • tfotfo Posts: 6 New Member
    When I shoot a hog deep in the swamps of the Savannah River I field dress them the way I do moose or high mountain mule deer.  Lay them on one side, remove skin on upper side by making a midline cut the entire length of the spine, work skin off legs, cut out the backstrap, remove the hind quarter, then front quarter.  Place each in its own plastic bag to keep off ground.  Roll carcass over and repeat.  Back pack the meat out.  I butcher the meat into roasts and vacuum pack it at home.  I hate losing the ribs but I can't drag big pigs out of cypress swamps.  It is actually faster than hanging and doing it the old fashion way.  Although, I gotta' say, my knees don't like it much.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,755 Senior Member
    tfo said:
    When I shoot a hog deep in the swamps of the Savannah River I field dress them the way I do moose or high mountain mule deer.  Lay them on one side, remove skin on upper side by making a midline cut the entire length of the spine, work skin off legs, cut out the backstrap, remove the hind quarter, then front quarter.  Place each in its own plastic bag to keep off ground.  Roll carcass over and repeat.  Back pack the meat out.  I butcher the meat into roasts and vacuum pack it at home.  I hate losing the ribs but I can't drag big pigs out of cypress swamps.  It is actually faster than hanging and doing it the old fashion way.  Although, I gotta' say, my knees don't like it much.
    Greetings 
    You have resurrected a few old threads
    Hope you stick around
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
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