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Question on 28ga shotguns

WORLD TWORLD T MemberPosts: 262 Member
What does one hunt with a 28 ga shotgun? Is there enough pellets for dove hunting? No better shot than I am, I need the ole 12.

Replies

  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,822 Senior Member
    I have not ever hunted with mine but suspect limiting factoer would be shot size. Seems most loads you see are 7 1/2 or 8 shot which I would guess would limit you to doves and such and perhaps some small game. I have seen some 6 shot at times which might open the field a bit more but it is rather pricey. With low budget stuff going $9-10/box and the good stuff $15-20 makes stepping up to 20ga for hunting a more ecconomical option.

    For the most part the 28ga is considered a skeet shooters choice.

    Sako
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,752 Senior Member
    28's are adequate dove, quail, woodcock and grouse guns...I know some folks who even use them on early season pheasants...but like .410s, are really best used by an experienced wingshooter. Also, you would have to go aways to find a more expensive gauge to hunt with...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,631 Senior Member
    A guy I hunted rabbits with used a 28, problem was that the pattern was so tight that most of the rabbits he shot were not worth cleaning as they were shot to mincemeat, some of the problem may have he liked #9 shot.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,285 Senior Member
    I use a 28 ga. for dove hunting, and used to hunt quail with it. It's a Rem. 870 with muzzle threaded for choke tubes. Full choke for doves, and I pass on shots I know are too far. I used improved cylinder for quail. It's not a 20 and certainly not a 12, but if you wait for the shots that you know you can make, it works.
    28 gauge ammunition is expensive if you buy it, but so is the .410 bore ammunition. I have 4 MEC reloaders, and roll my own for .410, 28, 20 and 12 ga.. Otherwise, I'd shoot them all a lot less.
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  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    A buddy of mine has a Winchester model 12, 28 ga. that his grandpa gave him when he was a kid (1950's). I started hunting with him in the late 70's for quail, dove & rabbits here in western Illinois. He was deadly on doves with it and even took it to South Dakota one year for pheasant. I helped him set up a mec Jr. press in the 80's so he could reload for it, as no local gun store had ammo available for it. He never reloaded for rifle or pistol nor any other shotgun gauge, just for his 28ga. model 12.

    As I recall, it left something to be desired as a pheasant round (at least in his hands), but I think that had more to do with his selection of load/shot-size.

    Joe
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 5,486 Senior Member
    The 28 gauge is the 270 Win of shotguns.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,822 Senior Member
    CaliFFL wrote: »
    The 28 gauge is the 270 Win of shotguns.

    Now that was just un-called for:rotflmao:


    Sako
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,119 Senior Member
    I don't think I have ever fired a 28 gauge shotgun. I've fired 12, 20, 16, .410 and possibly a 10 gauge way back when. The problem I see with a 28 gauge is that it's hard is hell to find shells for in a lot of places and they cost a fortune compared to their larger bore bretheren (cheapo Federal target 2+3/4" might run a bit over $5 a 25 rnd box where as 28 gauge of the same stuff is running over $10.) It's great for a kid just learning as it's not so incredibly small as to frustrate them like a .410 can, but it's game range is most certainly limited due to the lack of shot and smaller powder charge. If I owned one, I recon it would be exclusively for quail and dove. I MIGHT do pheasant with it if they were holding tight in the area I was hunting and I could get the bulk of the shot in on the bird, but ducks and geese outside of 20 yards? Negative.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • ZombieMaxZombieMax New Member Posts: 11 New Member
    A little 28 double or stacked barrel would be perfect for dove. I used a 410 one year just to see how it would perform and was quiet surprised how well I did. With the 8 you can load shells wih 1 oz of shot to equal the 20 guage. Like the 410 the main issue is cost of shells unless you reload or buy bulk.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,145 Senior Member
    Once you get past the short-barreled 12 gauge goblin blasters, my expertise with shotguns tapers off pretty sharply, so add grain of salt here.

    My understanding is that there's a fair amount of science behind the 28 gauge round. When loaded into the shell, the standard shot charge - 5/8 or maybe 3/4 ounce if I remember right - is exactly as long in the bore as it is wide. This is known as a "square" load. It produces less of a shot string, and all the pellets tend to arrive at once. The downside of this is that you don't have as much room for error on a moving target. The upside is that when you do hit, you hit with more pellets, so it's a very efficient killer of game or poofer of clays. This, coupled with the fact that the guns with dedicated receivers built for it weigh almost nothing, make it a very good choice for upland birds - once you get past the expense and relative scarcity of ammo.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    A guy I hunted rabbits with used a 28, problem was that the pattern was so tight that most of the rabbits he shot were not worth cleaning as they were shot to mincemeat, some of the problem may have he liked #9 shot.

    I would think his main problem was the choke the gun had. Too tight. I have a 20ga that is choked so tight you can't eat anything you shoot with it. It blows it to smitherines. That's the choke. I'm thinking of getting a slug barrel for it and using it in the shotgun hunts they have here at Lake Texana. But if you hit what you aim at with it, it's definitely DEAD! More DEADER! MOST DEAD!!!
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    Once you get past the short-barreled 12 gauge goblin blasters, my expertise with shotguns tapers off pretty sharply, so add grain of salt here.

    My understanding is that there's a fair amount of science behind the 28 gauge round. When loaded into the shell, the standard shot charge - 5/8 or maybe 3/4 ounce if I remember right - is exactly as long in the bore as it is wide. This is known as a "square" load. It produces less of a shot string, and all the pellets tend to arrive at once. The downside of this is that you don't have as much room for error on a moving target. The upside is that when you do hit, you hit with more pellets, so it's a very efficient killer of game or poofer of clays. This, coupled with the fact that the guns with dedicated receivers built for it weigh almost nothing, make it a very good choice for upland birds - once you get past the expense and relative scarcity of ammo.

    But that's an easy cure. Get you a hand loader and get after it. I bet you can get once fired AAs or Rem. Peters Blue Magic or something fairly cheap. Get a bag of no. 8 shot, the appropriate wad and primers and go for it. This is when hand loading actually saves you money. No way I can buy shot shells near as cheap as I can hand load them.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,822 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    Once you get past the short-barreled 12 gauge goblin blasters, my expertise with shotguns tapers off pretty sharply, so add grain of salt here.

    My understanding is that there's a fair amount of science behind the 28 gauge round. When loaded into the shell, the standard shot charge - 5/8 or maybe 3/4 ounce if I remember right - is exactly as long in the bore as it is wide. This is known as a "square" load. It produces less of a shot string, and all the pellets tend to arrive at once. The downside of this is that you don't have as much room for error on a moving target. The upside is that when you do hit, you hit with more pellets, so it's a very efficient killer of game or poofer of clays. This, coupled with the fact that the guns with dedicated receivers built for it weigh almost nothing, make it a very good choice for upland birds - once you get past the expense and relative scarcity of ammo.

    While I have no science to back it up, I would tend to agree with this. I have only ever shot trap with mine but it was quite effective from the 16 yard line. Dusting clays as well as a 12ga. Step back a few yards and things changed quickly. While hits were still solid, the percentage dropped. A tight shot colum could certianly explain this.

    Sako
  • ken55ken55 Senior Member Posts: 782 Senior Member
    My apologies in advance if this is a dumb question but how does a 28 gauge compare to a .410? Shotguns are on the [long] list of things I know very little about.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    I found a Remington 870 28ga LW in a pawn shop. I got it for $200.00 went and bought 2 boxes of shells for it $14.00 a box I ask for the cheap stuff and he told me this was the cheap stuff. Well I took it out and it worked fine. At that price for ammo it sat in my safe for years. One day at work I was talking to a serious skeet shooter and when I told him what I had he had to have it. All it was, was a shrunk down 870 kinda cute is why I bought it. Well he made several offers until he hit the one I couldn't refuse.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    I do believe the 28 gauge is larger than the 410. then the 20,16,12,10.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    ken55 wrote: »
    My apologies in advance if this is a dumb question but how does a 28 gauge compare to a .410? Shotguns are on the [long] list of things I know very little about.

    All I know Ken is that I have friends that have them and what was stated by BigSlug appears to have much merit. They are great killers for their size. A .410 is just what they say, a specialty gun for expert shooters. But a 28 even in a novice hands, if the novice is a fair shot, he can be successful with a .28 ga. Anyway, that's what one of my friends tells me that has one. It is just a very efficient killer of game, that is game in its class. I wouldn't take one goose hunting.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    CaliFFL wrote: »
    The 28 gauge is the 270 Win of shotguns.

    :rotflmao::rotflmao::roll2::roll2::rotflmao::rotflmao:
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,145 Senior Member
    Buford wrote: »
    I do believe the 28 gauge is larger than the 410. then the 20,16,12,10.

    It's possibly the goofiest measurement system in the universe - how many pure lead balls of a specific diameter to equal one pound. 12 gauge = 12balls, 20 gauge = 20 balls, and so on.

    Common gauge bore diameters, big to little:

    10ga = .775"
    12ga = .729"
    16ga = .663"
    20ga = .615"
    28ga = .550"
    .410" bore = 67.62 gauge. Call it a 68 gauge for simplicity.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    Buford wrote: »
    :rotflmao::rotflmao::roll2::roll2::rotflmao::rotflmao:

    Yes, you got this one right Buford!!! It, the .270, is a natural killer. It's a "Square Load!" Hahaha!!!
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Yes, you got this one right Buford!!! It, the .270, is a natural killer. It's a "Square Load!" Hahaha!!!
    I didn't say that, I thought it was funny is all. Although the square load thing could explain the accuracy problems with the .270.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    What a come back in true Buford Style! No you didn't say it in so many words but seeing as I know this to be true, I can construe your wording to mean what I want!!! Hahaha!!!

    Accuracy Problems??? Who??? Where??? When??? What??? Never heard of an accuracy problem with a .270. Not with mine anyway.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • dlkdlk Member Posts: 419 Member
    You forgot the 32ga = .526":tooth:
    STEALTH COMPETENT

    I know what I'm doing, it just doesn't look like it.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,708 Senior Member
    Well you have your adequate coyote rifle and I have my adequate Beretta boat anchor. We know the truth though.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    Yes we do.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    CaliFFL wrote: »
    The 28 gauge is the 270 Win of shotguns.

    ...actually, the 28 gauge is more like the...

    ...".257 Bob of shotguns"...
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