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What is the fat percentage of wild Texas whitetail venison doe?

Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
edited June 2020 in Hunting #1
Chances are it might even be leaner than 7% store-bought ground beef. I just have this idea: mix just enough raw sliced bacon or other raw pork to the venison grind to yield a meat mixture of 7% fat to have the fat calorie equivalent of 7% ground beef for a fat restricted diet. Is this doable? How much raw bacon shoud be added per a pound of wild Tx venison to get 7% fat for the deer sausage? It seems like a touch of savory bacon to the meat grind would make the venison taste really nice. 

I'm on a fat-restricted diet.Tonight I had grilled calf liver fried in bacon grease with two slices of bacon per serving. Bacon does wonders to make calf liver nice. Could it do wonders to venison as well? 
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Replies

  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    Venison is very lean, and probably leaner than 7% fat.  And, venison fat doesn't really add to the flavor of the meat.  If you plan to kill a Texas whitetail doe, have the butcher add beef fat or tallow to any ground meat.  

    If you have sausage made, use a mix of pork and venison.  Most game processing places in the area know the right mixture, so trust them.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    I think I brought up " Texas Squealers" in another meat related thread....anyway...there's no set recipe....sort of a "whatever makes you feel good thing"

    Don't try to make a bunch ahead of time...just get a meat grinder and make up a batch when the mood hits you.

    I usually use three or four strips of bacon per pound....but in the end it's a purely personal thing
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    edited June 2020 #4
    Venison is very lean, and probably leaner than 7% fat.  And, venison fat doesn't really add to the flavor of the meat.  If you plan to kill a Texas whitetail doe, have the butcher add beef fat or tallow to any ground meat.  

    If you have sausage made, use a mix of pork and venison.  Most game processing places in the area know the right mixture, so trust them.
    The lean ground beef I normally buy has 32 grams fat/pound or 2 grams fat/oz. meat.
    Whitetail deer has 8.8 grams fat/pound.(1.94% fat)
    1 slice uncooked bacon has 11 grams fat/slice (1 oz).

    So, by adding two slices uncooked bacon to one pound of venison for the grind I get a mixture of 18 oz @ 30.8 grams/fat. 0.58 grams fat/oz. meat or 1.7 grams fat/oz. meat.

    3 slices bacon per pound venison yields a ground mixture at 2.2 grams fat/oz (only slightly richer than 7% fat ground beef). Certainly bacon will add zip to deer flavor and make it moist enough for the George grillin-chillin grill. 

    I can live with that!! 

    I could just tell the butcher what fat percentage I require from the ground venison grind too. There is a mathmatical formula for this: it's called adjusting solutions. 




  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,913 Senior Member
    "Whitetail deer has 8.8 grams fat/pound."

    Says who?  That the same for a desert whitetail feeding on mesquite beans as it is for a whitetail gorging on food plots, farmers' fields and deer feeders?

    "1 slice uncooked bacon has 11 grams fat/slice (1 oz)."

    Again, this is not the same across the board. Not all bacon is the same.

    Yes, deer tend to be pretty lean. So are elk. Adding fat to ground game meat isn't new. No formulas or solutions needed. Just just do what everyone else already does. Add fat to the meat until it is what you like and you're done. Or just tell your butcher what you're looking for and they probably already know what to do.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    Jay said:
    "Whitetail deer has 8.8 grams fat/pound."

    Says who?  That the same for a desert whitetail feeding on mesquite beans as it is for a whitetail gorging on food plots, farmers' fields and deer feeders?

    "1 slice uncooked bacon has 11 grams fat/slice (1 oz)."

    Again, this is not the same across the board. Not all bacon is the same.

    Yes, deer tend to be pretty lean. So are elk. Adding fat to ground game meat isn't new. No formulas or solutions needed. Just just do what everyone else already does. Add fat to the meat until it is what you like and you're done. Or just tell your butcher what you're looking for and they probably already know what to do.

    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #7
    Wait....you ask a question and then give us your detailed answer to the very question you asked...so why bother asking?

    As usual...you neglect the fact that not all deer are the same......

    And by processing your own meat...you are in complete control of the fat content of the finished product...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,145 Senior Member
    If I wanted my venison to taste of pork, I would just let the deer go free and shoot a wild pig instead...........
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,452 Senior Member
    Deer processors in these parts use beef fat for raising the fat content in the processed meat. They get it from custom beef processors, and supermarkets with custom meat shops as part of the operation. That corn fed beef has a HUUUUGE amount of excess fat on it that must be trimmed off the cuts. By the way, all that fat that must be trimmed off is why supermarkets charge what they charge.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,249 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #10
    Jayhawker said:
    Wait....you ask a question and then give us your detailed answer to the very question you asked...so why bother asking?
    Wow.......I never noticed that. ;)

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    Stating the obvious....again...in case anybody missed it the first time...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    Jayhawker said:
    *Wait....you ask a question and then give us your detailed answer to the very question you asked...so why bother asking?

    As usual...you neglect the fact that not all deer are the same......

    And by processing your own meat...you are in complete control of the fat content of the finished product...
    *Please cite an example of my doing that. If so I'm not aware of it. 


    I think one might just tell the deer processor to adjust the ground meat to 7% fat and leave it at that. What I'm considering doing is having a ground venison that would make a substitute for store-bought 7% fat ground beef. Is that a good idea? 

    I'm on a fat-restricted diet but at the same time I don't want be punished with yucky meat. It's all theory to me and I would have to actually taste my concept to decide whether I can palate it or not. Whether I like the taste of venison prepared any way will determine whether I take up deer hunting or not. I only wish to hunt what I can stand to eat. I wish I could sample some store-bought wild game before committing to hunting.

    I'm using store-bought beef as the gold standard to which compare wild game with taste/texture-wise. I would hate to invest time, money and energy taking up hunting to find out wild game sucks.


    Hunting is a risky venture to me, economically speaking. 

     


  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    Read the title of your post...where you asked a question...

    Then read Post #116....

    I have an idea for you...there are a lot of specialty stores that sell venison...go buy a pound and see if you like it before you go to all the trouble of hunting deer...Then get back with us...

    If you're expecting venison to taste like beef...you're going to be disappointed...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,570 Senior Member
    THIS
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,145 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #15
    I seem to remember a scientific study carried out by researchers a few years back regarding the taste difference between beef and venison.They came up with a testing procedure that compared the 2.

    It went something like this........They gut shot a steer, then chased it for 2 miles before finishing it off with a second shot. They left it laying in the sun for 2 hours before gutting it, then dragged it through a swamp for 2 miles and  down a dusty road behind a quad bike for another three miles. It was then laid it on the bed of a pickup truck and driven for 10 miles in the hot sun before getting a guy with no experience at butchery to cut it up and they made sure that he didnt put it on ice for 24hrs before he froze it.

    They then waited 2 days, took some of the beef steak out of the freezer, let it defrost on a bench for 36 hrs before sticking it on a hot grill and cooking it for 45mins a side.
    They called in a panel of experts to taste the beef and compare it with some venison.

    All the panel of tasters were unanimous that the beef tasted just like venison.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,877 Senior Member
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,877 Senior Member
    Wild game management is administered by state game agencies. They generally have complete comprehensive information online. You may be able to procure game meat or buffalo meat via mail order from scorces some distance away including other states.

    My previous post. I forgot to make clear that the cooking dishes/pots need lids to seal in the moisture, and the exterior fat on the deer should be trimmed off.

    Also domestic beef and pork can be cooked so as to minimize fat content. Information online is abundant, and questions or confusion can likely be cleared up with one's doctor.
  • Some_MookSome_Mook Posts: 364 Member
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
    There are many programs where hunters can donate their harvest to be distributed among local food kitchens, so if you are adamant that you want to try wild harvested deer, that is an option worth looking into. Being as you have never hunted deer, and don't know anyone who has hunted deer, the probability of you having a successful hunt on public lands the first time out is slim. Theoretically possible, but slim. The operative word is 'hunting' as opposed to 'shooting', so if, as you have so redundantly stated in previous posts over multiple threads, you are concerned about the monetary investment of hunting and the palatability of wild harvested game meat my advice, for what little worth any advice from some Mook would ever be, is don't do it. Or go for broke and give it a try. If you end up disappointed you can mitigate your losses by selling any items you no longer need. Asking questions on a forum and quietly evaluating the opinions posted in response is one thing. Endlessly beating a topic to death on a forum in the hope of finally getting an answer you wish to hear, or in the hope of finding people who will agree with your stance (which has obviously not been developed empirically) is counter-productive if you would like to be considered in a favorable way among other forum members.
    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace." - Thomas Paine
    "I know my place in the world and it ain’t standing next to Jerry Miculek" - Zee
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    edited June 2020 #20
    Some_Mook said:
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
    There are many programs where hunters can donate their harvest to be distributed among local food kitchens, so if you are adamant that you want to try wild harvested deer, that is an option worth looking into. Being as you have never hunted deer, and don't know anyone who has hunted deer, the probability of you having a successful hunt on public lands the first time out is slim. Theoretically possible, but slim. The operative word is 'hunting' as opposed to 'shooting', so if, as you have so redundantly stated in previous posts over multiple threads, you are concerned about the monetary investment of hunting and the palatability of wild harvested game meat my advice, for what little worth any advice from some Mook would ever be, is don't do it. Or go for broke and give it a try. If you end up disappointed you can mitigate your losses by selling any items you no longer need. Asking questions on a forum and quietly evaluating the opinions posted in response is one thing. Endlessly beating a topic to death on a forum in the hope of finally getting an answer you wish to hear, or in the hope of finding people who will agree with your stance (which has obviously not been developed empirically) is counter-productive if you would like to be considered in a favorable way among other forum members.
    All I want is some advice. Up until now, I never asked where to get some wild venison to try out. Perhaps, I should forgo the whole crazy idea of deer hunting altogether until I meet some folks already seasoned in that bag. Just stick with dove for starters. Less money at risk to try that out. 
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,452 Senior Member
    Jaysus!!!!! If you don't know if you like venison, elk, etc. then just buy it! It's quite legal to buy these wild game meats from game farms that specialize in that area. The internet is a wonderful tool; just enter a search parameter and be bombarded with options.

    https://www.bing.com/search?q=Game+farm+deer+meat+for+sale&form=ANNTH1&refig=6e0eb68542b4463cb513b60f02b72cb9

    https://brokenarrowranch.com/blogs/wild-and-pure/venison-for-sale
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    I'm going to answer a question you haven't asked, but maybe it will re-enforce Tennmike's suggestion.

    A Texas hill country whitetail doe will yield at most 30-40 lbs. of meat, even with bones in.  I prefer mine deboned, which will further decrease that weight.  So, if at all possible, do yourself a favor and try some that is commercially available before spending a lot of money to kill one or two.

    I love good venison, and eat what I kill, but I quit pretending that I'm a meat hunter a long, long time ago.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,294 Senior Member
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
    Wait... I thought you said you live in Texas.  You don't know anyone that hunts?

    Yes- it is illegal to sell or trade wild Whitetail venison.  What you get at stores/ restaurants is usually Axis venison (an Indian exotic deer that runs wild all over central Texas) that can be raised, harvested, and sold just like beef.  Some people say that Axis and whitetail are similar, but I think Axis is a superior meat.  

    There are lots of places you can get venison in Austin.
    https://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2002-06-07/94441/
    (BTW, Broken Arrow ranch is run buy a guy I went to high school with)
    There are also lots of restaurants here that serve venison-
    Dai Due
    Hudson's Hill Country
    Lonesome Dove Bistro,
    etc... etc...

    Its going to be a LOT more expensive than a 'steak' at Denny's, but it's cheaper than buying a hunt and finding out you don't like it.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #24
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
    Wait... I thought you said you live in Texas.  You don't know anyone that hunts?

    Yes- it is illegal to sell or trade wild Whitetail venison.  What you get at stores/ restaurants is usually Axis venison (an Indian exotic deer that runs wild all over central Texas) that can be raised, harvested, and sold just like beef.  Some people say that Axis and whitetail are similar, but I think Axis is a superior meat.  

    There are lots of places you can get venison in Austin.
    https://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2002-06-07/94441/
    (BTW, Broken Arrow ranch is run buy a guy I went to high school with)
    There are also lots of restaurants here that serve venison-
    Dai Due
    Hudson's Hill Country
    Lonesome Dove Bistro,
    etc... etc...

    Its going to be a LOT more expensive than a 'steak' at Denny's, but it's cheaper than buying a hunt and finding out you don't like it.
    Odds are...that is you buy venison at a restaurant it will be prepared correctly...At home you're going to risk overlooking it if you don't know what you're doingand that, is without a doubt, the worst thing you can do with good venison...

    I once gifted my brother with a backstraps from a doe that I had shot and processed....his wife cut it up into medallions, soaked them in salt water overnight to " get the blood out" and then dredged those sad  gray morsels in flour and pan fried them...then had the nerve to say "that deer was horrible!".....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,861 Senior Member
    Sometimes, a local abattoir will have unclaimed venison after the season is over.  At least I've heard this is true.   I don't like venison much, although it's healthy for you.  Put enough seasoning spices and don't overcook it and it's palatable. 
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    edited June 2020 #26
    Jayhawker said:
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
    Wait... I thought you said you live in Texas.  You don't know anyone that hunts?

    Yes- it is illegal to sell or trade wild Whitetail venison.  What you get at stores/ restaurants is usually Axis venison (an Indian exotic deer that runs wild all over central Texas) that can be raised, harvested, and sold just like beef.  Some people say that Axis and whitetail are similar, but I think Axis is a superior meat.  

    There are lots of places you can get venison in Austin.
    https://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2002-06-07/94441/
    (BTW, Broken Arrow ranch is run buy a guy I went to high school with)
    There are also lots of restaurants here that serve venison-
    Dai Due
    Hudson's Hill Country
    Lonesome Dove Bistro,
    etc... etc...

    Its going to be a LOT more expensive than a 'steak' at Denny's, but it's cheaper than buying a hunt and finding out you don't like it.
    Odds are...that is you buy venison at a restaurant it will be prepared correctly...At home you're going to risk overlooking it if you don't know what you're doingand that, is without a doubt, the worst thing you can do with good venison...

    I once gifted my brother with a backstraps from a doe that I had shot and processed....his wife cut it up into medallions, soaked them in salt water overnight to " get the blood out" and then dredged those sad  gray morsels in flour and pan fried them...then had the nerve to say "that deer was horrible!".....
    I will have to contact broken arrow.

    I will ask them some questions: May I custom order DOE (female) venison? May I also order a custom fat percentage of 7% fat with added beef tallow? I really want to sample venison set to a certain degree of leanness. I noticed they have wild axis venison listed on their menu. 

    How does one add beef tallow at home to ground venison? Does one melt the fat, measure it with a spoon then mix it into the meat by hand? 
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,877 Senior Member
    If you recieve processed meat it will likely already contain added tallow or fat.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #28

    If you go in asking if your venison came from a buck or a doe, you are going to get the same look I have on my face after reading your post...

    That being said...my butcher usually has unclaimed deer after the end of the season that he will sell for the cost of processing...you get the whole deer...no picking or choosing...BUT...you have no idea how that deer was handled BEFORE it got to the butcher...for all you know the thing was gut shot and laid in the woods for half a day before it was found.

    Get a meat grinder....that way you can custom grind your own meat to your exacting requirements...and add whatever percentage of fat your heart desires...

    And NO..you do not melt it....fat (tallow, suet, ground pork) is added during the grinding process....usually on the second pass through the grinder so it mixes with the meat thoroughly...

    Is over thinking everything painful?
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,452 Senior Member
    I will have to contact broken arrow.



    How does one add beef tallow at home to ground venison? Does one melt the fat, measure it with a spoon then mix it into the meat by hand? 
    You mix the beef fat in when you grind the meat. Do you have a meat grinder?
    You weigh the lean meat and cut it down into chunks or strips. Weigh enough fat to add to your taste/specifications to the meat. Mix them together and grind it up. May have to run through grinder twice to get a good mix.
    Melting beef or hog fat and pouring that mess on raw meat will make one filthy mess.

      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,249 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:


    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Venison has no marbling. The fat all forms between the flesh and the skin/hide.

    It can be cooked without additional fat added. Use a Pyrex pan and bake it in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and vegetables to prevent it being dry. Crockpots and or dutch ovens can also be used.

    The olive oil is a type of fat. Some fats are healthy. Like fish oil etc.. Some minor research and/or consultation with one's physician can sort out what fats are ok in one's diet. 


    I don't know one person who hunts deer. Apparently, wild venison can't be commercially sold anywhere in the US. A far as I know, the only way I could obtain wild vension is to harvest it myself. Could I legally trade beef for venison in a private transaction? 
    Wait... I thought you said you live in Texas.  You don't know anyone that hunts?

    Yes- it is illegal to sell or trade wild Whitetail venison.  What you get at stores/ restaurants is usually Axis venison (an Indian exotic deer that runs wild all over central Texas) that can be raised, harvested, and sold just like beef.  Some people say that Axis and whitetail are similar, but I think Axis is a superior meat.  

    There are lots of places you can get venison in Austin.
    https://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2002-06-07/94441/
    (BTW, Broken Arrow ranch is run buy a guy I went to high school with)
    There are also lots of restaurants here that serve venison-
    Dai Due
    Hudson's Hill Country
    Lonesome Dove Bistro,
    etc... etc...

    Its going to be a LOT more expensive than a 'steak' at Denny's, but it's cheaper than buying a hunt and finding out you don't like it.
    Odds are...that is you buy venison at a restaurant it will be prepared correctly...At home you're going to risk overlooking it if you don't know what you're doingand that, is without a doubt, the worst thing you can do with good venison...

    I once gifted my brother with a backstraps from a doe that I had shot and processed....his wife cut it up into medallions, soaked them in salt water overnight to " get the blood out" and then dredged those sad  gray morsels in flour and pan fried them...then had the nerve to say "that deer was horrible!".....
    May I custom order DOE (female) venison? 
    Dude! Everyone knows that a doe is a female....no need to explain that one

    It not that you ask questions...it's HOW you ask questions...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
This discussion has been closed.
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