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In your opinion, what is the greatest war movie ever made?

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  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,089 Senior Member
    Danger Close is a Damn good movie about the ANZACS at Battle of Long Tan...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,453 Senior Member
    Spk said:
    I've seen a lot of good war  movies and I there's a lot of good movies mentioned above but the one that sticks out in my head is The Siege of Firebase Gloria.
    It's not a feel good movie and doesn't even pretend to be. Parts of it are hard to watch because truth can be difficult sometimes. It explores heroism among an ocean of idiocy and politics.
    For those of you who are adventurous R. Lee Ermey fans or just really bored and want something else to watch, I'd recommend The Siege of Firebase Gloria.

    Hadn't heard of this one. Gonna have to see about finding it on DVD. Got to be pretty good if R. Lee Ermey is in it. He was a real deal Marine.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
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  • N454casullN454casull Member Posts: 611 Senior Member
    I really enjoyed both Midway and 1917. 
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,861 Senior Member
    Tugar said:
    Cross of Iron, Gene. Great movie. Platoon for Vietnam. Though Bat21 and Flight of the Intruder  were awesome. For Korea, that's much harder ut my pick, Field of Honor with Everett McGill.



    Although it was never made into a movie (I wish it was) there was a book back in the 80's titled "The Five Fingers" by Gayle Rivers (a pseudonym). The book, if I remember correctly, is about a U.K and U.S. special operation team supposedly (emphasis added) recruited by the CIA to assassinate a Chinese general on Chinese soil during the Vietnam War. Whether the story is true or not it was quite popular with us guys at Ft. Bragg at the time. Very well written and shows how troops are sometimes used as expendable political cannon fodder for dark ops. Highly recommended to you military readers. 



    I read that book and while exciting, was poorly researched.  One guy had a Greener shotgun (IIRC) which he turned down a "bore's tooth" at the muzzle. Whatever a "bore's tooth" is is completely out of the realm of believability.    Supposedly it increased the spread. In addition, he carried reloading equipment for it (!!!) to use in the field rather than carrying extra shells, which would require him picking up spent shells and wouldn't save much in the way of weight, which is why the author had  him do it.  Maybe he carried empty shells, can't remember.  This assumes an operator deep in enemy territory would have had the time and daylight to reload shotgun shells. Simpler to carry already loaded shells with lead, powder, primers, means of crimping.  

    It's a method of writers to gain belief by stating what they write is true.  Mostly, it's not.  The movie "Fargo" states it's true in the beginning, even gives a year (1987), but it isn't. The Five Fingers states it's true, but it's a rather poorly researched novel.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,964 Senior Member
    There is an old movie I remember as a kid where some POWs in Germany build a glider to escape with - anybody remember?
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 846 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #37
    Gallipoli, the Peter Weir film is up there imho, as is The Wind that Shakes the Barley.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,326 Senior Member
    Some classics from a few decades back: Where Eagles Dare, Guns of Navarone and The Dirty Dozen.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • bhl2506bhl2506 Senior Member Posts: 1,962 Senior Member
    Tora, Tora, Tora wasn't to bad. Pearl harbor as seen from the japanese side. It's been so long since we watched it I really don't remember complete details.
    Refusing to conform to the left wing mantra of political correctness by insisting on telling the truth does not make you a loud mouth.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    tennmike said:
    Spk said:
    I've seen a lot of good war  movies and I there's a lot of good movies mentioned above but the one that sticks out in my head is The Siege of Firebase Gloria.
    It's not a feel good movie and doesn't even pretend to be. Parts of it are hard to watch because truth can be difficult sometimes. It explores heroism among an ocean of idiocy and politics.
    For those of you who are adventurous R. Lee Ermey fans or just really bored and want something else to watch, I'd recommend The Siege of Firebase Gloria.

    Hadn't heard of this one. Gonna have to see about finding it on DVD. Got to be pretty good if R. Lee Ermey is in it. He was a real deal Marine.
    It's on Amazon streaming!
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,089 Senior Member
    The Battle of the Bulge...the one with Henry Fonda..was pretty good...the only thing that killed it for me were all the American tanks with iron crosses painted on them...as a matter of fact, they did the same thing in Patton

    Perfectly OK for the "a tank is a tank" crowd, but for anyone who knows anything about armor...it's a little disquieting...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,888 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    There is an old movie I remember as a kid where some POWs in Germany build a glider to escape with - anybody remember?
    I saw a documentary on PBS. It was about POWs held in a compound that built a gluider to launch from a tower window. I don't think they ever actually got to carry out the plan. The science guys on the show tried to recreate the details and sent a glider loaded with weight out the tower window to see if it could work. I wish I could remember more........
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,386 Senior Member
    Lotta good ones up already.

    Enemy at the Gates needs a mention.

    Kenneth Branagh's Henry V

    I got VERY sucked in by the visuals of The Pacific: early war to late war, they REALLY paid attention to what equipment belonged when.

    In the same vein, I saw 1917 at the theater twice - I haven't started wearing out my Blu Ray disc - - -yet.

    Tolkien and The Water Diviner - movies in which the Somme and Gallipoli, respectively, play a major part.

    Legends of the Fall - reminds us that the Civil War, Indian Wars, the Old West, WWI, and Prohibition, were events that were seen by about three contiguous generations.   Done by Edward Zwick, who also did Glory and The Last Samurai, which belong here as well.

    Empire of the Sun:  A lot I liked about that movie, but the P-51 air raid was about as much of a religious experience for me as it was for the young Christian Bale. :D

    Gods & Generals / Gettysburg

    Not technically a war movie but the Starz pirate series Black Sails (set around 1717), and Last of the Mohicans - Director's Cut (set in 1757), both scripted to capture a lot of the tension of the buildup to the American Revolution.

    Master and Commander - The Far Side of the World - -did the books justice.

    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,964 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    There is an old movie I remember as a kid where some POWs in Germany build a glider to escape with - anybody remember?
    I saw a documentary on PBS. It was about POWs held in a compound that built a glider to launch from a tower window. I don't think they ever actually got to carry out the plan. The science guys on the show tried to recreate the details and sent a glider loaded with weight out the tower window to see if it could work. I wish I could remember more........
    In the movie I *think* they were successful. It was set in some kind of castle, the glider was assembled on a roof gable abutting a window. I remember one of the wings stuck out where it could be seen from the ground, but of course nobody did.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,888 Senior Member
    Yea that sounds familiar. An indoor track along the gable.

    IIRC the weighted reproduction made it to the place of planned destination, but survivability of the landing became a question.
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,067 Senior Member
    Bigslug said:
    Lotta good ones up already.

    ...

    Master and Commander - The Far Side of the World - -did the books justice.

    That's a feel good movie and they did a dang good job of it. By the end of the movie I wanted to be a British sailor in the 1700's 😁
    Love that classical music.

    "... The lesser of two weevils!"
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • JustsomedudeJustsomedude Posts: 607 Senior Member
    Enemy at the gates. 
    Platoon.
    The patriot.
    We were soldiers.
    Saving private Ryan.
    Lone survivor.

    Those are my favorite. Lone Survivor is knuckle clenching the whole time. Its unreal that !#$% really happened!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,964 Senior Member
    We were soldiers was particular poignant.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,861 Senior Member
    The book "Enemy at the Gates" is completely different from the movie.  The book is a non-fiction account of the Battle of Stalingrad. The sniper gets a mention, but that's about it.  I read it in 1994 or so, and I recommend it.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,936 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #50
    Saving Private Ryan
    Enemy At The Gates
    Kelly's Heroes
    The Winter War (Finnish Movie with Subtitles)
    Apocalypse Now
    Platoon
    We Were Soldiers
    Full Metal Jacket
    Cold Mountain
    Fury
    Galipoli
    Band Of Brothers
    Starship Troopers :)
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,888 Senior Member
    I thought about Cold Mountain. Kind of a mushy love story in there, but it does seem to touch on some overlooked ugliness of that war.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,964 Senior Member
    I thought about Cold Mountain. Kind of a mushy love story in there, but it does seem to touch on some overlooked ugliness of that war.
    Agreed. The ending of that movie REALLY sucked, I was screwed up for days...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 846 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #53
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Saving Private Ryan
    Enemy At The Gates
    Kelly's Heroes
    The Winter War (Finnish Movie with Subtitles)
    Apocalypse Now
    Platoon
    We Were Soldiers
    Full Metal Jacket
    Cold Mountain
    Fury
    Galipoli
    Band Of Brothers
    Starship Troopers :)
    Man, I forgot about Talvisota, that is a brilliant and brutal film.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,386 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    The book "Enemy at the Gates" is completely different from the movie.  The book is a non-fiction account of the Battle of Stalingrad. The sniper gets a mention, but that's about it.  I read it in 1994 or so, and I recommend it.
    Yup.  I think the events of the movie take less than a page in the book.

    Considering the practices of the two sides involved in the fight, I'm not sure there will ever be a "non-fiction account" of the Battle of Stalingrad.  Somewhere around here, I have a U.S. Army translation of a post-WWII Soviet marksmanship/competition manual from the 1950's.  Lots of good technical info there, but in spots they lay their politics on THICK.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,326 Senior Member
    Bigslug said:
    Lotta good ones up already.

    Enemy at the Gates needs a mention.

    Kenneth Branagh's Henry V

    I got VERY sucked in by the visuals of The Pacific: early war to late war, they REALLY paid attention to what equipment belonged when.

    In the same vein, I saw 1917 at the theater twice - I haven't started wearing out my Blu Ray disc - - -yet.

    Tolkien and The Water Diviner - movies in which the Somme and Gallipoli, respectively, play a major part.

    Legends of the Fall - reminds us that the Civil War, Indian Wars, the Old West, WWI, and Prohibition, were events that were seen by about three contiguous generations.   Done by Edward Zwick, who also did Glory and The Last Samurai, which belong here as well.

    Empire of the Sun:  A lot I liked about that movie, but the P-51 air raid was about as much of a religious experience for me as it was for the young Christian Bale. :D

    Gods & Generals / Gettysburg

    Not technically a war movie but the Starz pirate series Black Sails (set around 1717), and Last of the Mohicans - Director's Cut (set in 1757), both scripted to capture a lot of the tension of the buildup to the American Revolution.

    Master and Commander - The Far Side of the World - -did the books justice.

    Good job on this list!  Master and Commander is a once a year watch for me as well as The Last Samurai, Legends of the Fall and The Last of the Mohicans!  I’ll add Kevin Costner’s Dances with Wolves for the spectacular cinematography and action scenes. 
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • Some_MookSome_Mook Posts: 365 Member
    zorba said:
    We were soldiers was particular poignant.
    Have you read the book?  The movie covers the action of the 1/7 Cav at LZ X-Ray, which is the first portion of the book and could arguably be described as a US victory, albeit at great cost.  The major slaughter of US troops in the Ia Drang Valley occurred after the action at X-Ray had concluded as the 2/7 Cav troops were marching to LZ Albany for extraction.  A cinematic depiction of that area of battle might be too tough for US audiences to watch.  I have to wipe tears from my eyes just reading about it.
    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace." - Thomas Paine
    "I know my place in the world and it ain’t standing next to Jerry Miculek" - Zee
  • Some_MookSome_Mook Posts: 365 Member
    Gene L said:
    The book "Enemy at the Gates" is completely different from the movie.  The book is a non-fiction account of the Battle of Stalingrad. The sniper gets a mention, but that's about it.  I read it in 1994 or so, and I recommend it.


    I wonder how much the Left Hand Mosin depicted in the movie posters would be worth.   :D
    Gene L said:
      
    The movie "Fargo" states it's true in the beginning, even gives a year (1987), but it isn't. 



    "Fargo" states at the beginning that it is a true "story", the humor of the statement being that it truly is a 'story'
    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace." - Thomas Paine
    "I know my place in the world and it ain’t standing next to Jerry Miculek" - Zee
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,861 Senior Member
    I read "Starship Troopers" about a month ago, re-read it, actually, after learning the star of the movie (Casper van Diem)  had married  a woman named Jennie Wenger.  This piqued my interest because she was one of the main characters in the documentary "Confessions of a Superhero" in 2007, which was about Hollywood street performers who dress as superheros and hustle the tourists for tips.  Wenger dressed as Wonder Woman.  Good looking, but I would never have figured she'd marry a movie star. She wanted to BE a star.

    The movie was OK, but some parts of it seemed weird and vaguely anti-war. 

    Talk about politics. The book, which I first read in the 8th grade, had very little action and reflected strongly the right wing politics of Heinlein. I was surprised a bit, although I knew Heinlein had some right wing views, and strongly (STRONGLY) militaristic.  I've read other books by him, they're all patriotic but this one is the most political of the ones I've read.  
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,936 Senior Member
    waipapa13 said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Saving Private Ryan
    Enemy At The Gates
    Kelly's Heroes
    The Winter War (Finnish Movie with Subtitles)
    Apocalypse Now
    Platoon
    We Were Soldiers
    Full Metal Jacket
    Cold Mountain
    Fury
    Galipoli
    Band Of Brothers
    Starship Troopers :)
    Man, I forgot about Talvisota, that is a brilliant and brutal film.
    We were particularly impressed they built Saunas in the trenches, got everybody warmed up and cleaned up
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,936 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #60
    Gene L said:
    I read "Starship Troopers" about a month ago, re-read it, actually, after learning the star of the movie (Casper van Diem)  had married  a woman named Jennie Wenger.  This piqued my interest because she was one of the main characters in the documentary "Confessions of a Superhero" in 2007, which was about Hollywood street performers who dress as superheros and hustle the tourists for tips.  Wenger dressed as Wonder Woman.  Good looking, but I would never have figured she'd marry a movie star. She wanted to BE a star.

    The movie was OK, but some parts of it seemed weird and vaguely anti-war. 

    Talk about politics. The book, which I first read in the 8th grade, had very little action and reflected strongly the right wing politics of Heinlein. I was surprised a bit, although I knew Heinlein had some right wing views, and strongly (STRONGLY) militaristic.  I've read other books by him, they're all patriotic but this one is the most political of the ones I've read.  
    I love Heinlein, once I found an author I liked at the library, I would usually read through everything they had on the shelf.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,814 Senior Member
    A lot of good ones have been mentioned here. Of the recent ones, I REALLY enjoyed "Dunkirk," "Midway," and "1917."
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
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