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Pitted receiver

AxeAxe MemberPosts: 421 Member
edited June 19 in General Firearms #1
Hey guys, I just acquired a shotgun from my dad, and the thing is a mess. It was kept in a gun case for about 20 years and had some heavy rust. 
The shotgun is a Smith and Wesson 1000 super, made by Howa for Mossberg. I currently have the gun broken down, have the receiver stripped to bare metal for a bath in metal rescue overnight to remove the remainder of rust and bluing. 
Any suggestions on getting the rest of the pitting removed? Once cleaned up, I am going to re blue or ceracoat, maybe send it out for refinishing. 
Thanks 

Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,763 Senior Member
    Depending on how bad the pitting is, that is to say, gone beyond surface rust, Cerakote may be your only option...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,286 Senior Member
    I would suggest you don’t do any further metal removal by filling or sandpapering.  I would bead blast the rest of the rust off which will only move the remaining metal surface around enough to give you a nice even finish, and then have it blued or cerakoted.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • AxeAxe Member Posts: 421 Member
    I am going to soak it overnight and try to buff out one more time with 0000 steel wool and oil. If it doesn’t work I’ll send it out probably for refininish work
  • JustsomedudeJustsomedude Posts: 430 Member
    Thats actually not as bad as you think and could be brought back to a high polish with some careful work. If it was truly deep pitting, a sandblast and hot blue for a matte finish would be your best bet. Just depends on what you want to spend. 
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,286 Senior Member
    Thats actually not as bad as you think and could be brought back to a high polish with some careful work. If it was truly deep pitting, a sandblast and hot blue for a matte finish would be your best bet. Just depends on what you want to spend. 
    I agree.  That doesn’t look at bad as I thought it would.  He has options!
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,032 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    Thats actually not as bad as you think and could be brought back to a high polish with some careful work. If it was truly deep pitting, a sandblast and hot blue for a matte finish would be your best bet. Just depends on what you want to spend. 
    I agree.  That doesn’t look at bad as I thought it would.  He has options!
    I agree as well.  Years ago before my pop passed I was sent two of his guns (1953 AYA double barrel and a 1940's Win Mod 94 .32 Win Special) which had sat up in his attic for 20+ years, uncased and he lived six blocks off the ocean.  They were rusted inside and out.  I gave them to my smith to refinish.  He wasn't sure looking at them if it was worth it but would give it a try.  He stripped them down, bead blasted all of the parts, refinished both with a high gloss blue job.  The stocks he sent to his buddy to refinish.   When I got them back they both looked brand new, what little pitting there was gone for the most part!  I'd let someone take a try at refinishing them.  Would love to see the finished product! 
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,152 Senior Member
    Axe said:
    I am going to soak it overnight and try to buff out one more time with 0000 steel wool and oil. If it doesn’t work I’ll send it out probably for refininish work
    Pitting is just that - pits.  Only way to make it look pretty at that point is to uniformly take the entire surface down below the bottom of the pits.  Fine grit wet/oil block sanding is probably the ticket there.  Trick is on a curve like the top of your receiver, you'll have to sand even the parts that aren't pitted or it'll look pretty crappe'.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • AxeAxe Member Posts: 421 Member
  • AxeAxe Member Posts: 421 Member
    At the half way point with pit removal. Hope to have the receiver finally cleaned up by this week and ready to rebuke.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,286 Senior Member
    Good work!  
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,738 Senior Member
    Nice! Good work. Its great to rescue an older gun from the scrap pile. After you finish it and have it just the way you want that old work horse will have a lot more memories and miles in her.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,748 Senior Member
    Hey! That's pretty good for a guy named Axe...

     :) 
  • AxeAxe Member Posts: 421 Member
    Hey! That's pretty good for a guy named Axe...

     :) 
    Thanks! I have to admit that having a lengthy career of breaking down doors and busting things up, it’s nice as hell to fix things too.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,664 Senior Member
    Looks good, dont forget to show us when completed
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
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