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Good hunting rifle for woman?

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  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    There's lots of .270s out there..Damn fine coyote rifles. ...sorry, but I had to do that...   :)
    Aimcat, don't pay any attention to him, he's eaten up with .270 derangement syndrome. There's a lot of that on here. If you want to know about the .270 do a search on Jack O'Connor. LOL!

    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #33
    I've seen the 260 Remington and 6.5 Creed mentioned but not a 6.5x55 Swede. In a modern rifle to me at least it would be even better.

    I've seen the 260 Remington and 6.5 Creed mentioned but not a 6.5x55 Swede. In a modern rifle to me at least it would be even better.

    Whether it makes a damn to anybody here, the 6.5x55 is one of two 6.5s I'm even interested in. I would be interested in the .260 but Remington saddled it in their short action and the Creed blows it away like that. In a long or intermediate action the .260 would be a real performer . Why Remington doesn't offer an intermediate action is beyond me. I'm also interested in an old version of 6.5, the 6.5x57. I'm considering building one on one of  my Yugo actions. It's longer than a Remington short action and it will give ballistics better than the 6.5 Crudmoor. Try it you might like it.

    I like the idea of the 6.5x55 or the 6.5x57. Either one is a great cartridge.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,250 Senior Member
    For most jobs, it's pretty hard to beat the .243 Win. chambering. 

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    RugerFan said:
    .243 and 7mm-08 will probably be the most readily available ammo. 

    Ruger Fan, I'm with you on this but want to throw in the .257 Roberts into the mix. Any of those are fine for women. I seriously would also say .270 but some .270s can be a little stout in the recoil department. Although I think they are fine killers of deer size game, the recoil can be a little stiff.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,250 Senior Member
    Try to find .257 Roberts ammo at Wally-World.  Or anywhere else.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    Try to find .257 Roberts ammo at Wally-World.  Or anywhere else.

    Mike
    Grain of salt. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JaphyJaphy Posts: 68 Member
    Many years of deer hunting in the midwest ..(reallly I mean many) I learned a few things.
    1.  I never shot more than once. Cover was too thick, visibility too limited.

    2.  in heavy cover and rolling wooded terrain with farm crops visibility is very limited 100 yard shots are rare

    3. hi velocity ammunition does not work well in cover ..a leaf, a twig, anything in the path even stuff you cannot see will cause a missed shot.  a heavier slower round will work better.

    4. if selecting a single rifle may be used for a variety of game...white tail and hogs? or white tail and elk or other combinations... one load may not be applicable to larger and smaller game  something like 3006 or 7mm Rem are available in a wide variety of loads
    115gr - 180gr. .308 also comes in a wide range.

    5. simple is better in foul weather particularly sleet and snow I have had semi-auto shotguns malfunction. same could happen with a semi auto rifle.

    6. Hardwood stocks are beautiful, but they change size with the weather and are easily scraped and scratched in hunting environment.. I would opt for synthetic in a heartbeat

    my goto for years was a  Browning model 78, 7mm Rem mag, sport stock, round barrel, with a 3x-9x.  wide angle of view and big bright objective are probably more important than magnification... use binocs for spotting.

    The 78 is no longer manufactured but the Winchester 1885 high wall or Ruger No 1 may be close both tack drivers, falling block action, excellent internals..

    I know there is an aversion to single shot anything but ask your self when was that last time you shot 2x at a single animal?

    after many years I switched to a handgun (Ruger Superblackhawk .44 mag) iron sights, 71/2 bbl.   just as successful..without lugging a rifle up trees across muddy fields and through thick brush, while being more than careful ALL the time to avoid dinging the scope or scraping the stock crossing barb wire fences....A handgun and shoulder holster frees both hands,  a rifle without a sling requires both hands all the time!!

    so I would opt for a falling block in 7mm Rem, 3006, or .308 if you hunt in rifle country
    if you hunt midwest or southeast brush .. a .44 mag revolver



  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    ............
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    For most jobs, it's pretty hard to beat the .243 Win. chambering. 

    Mike
    Yeah, that.  You 6mm Remington is even better, but much hard to find factory ammo.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    When I was 16, my dad borrowed a .243 for me to use for deer hunting.  I killed my first buck with it.  We loaded it with 80 grain Winchester Silver Tip factory ammo.  I was amazed at how light the recoil was.  Now, I have a .243 that I load with a heavier bullet, but it's still a very nice rifle with light recoil.  I have taken several antelope with it.

    Btw, when I was 16, I probably weighed about 120 lbs. soaking wet.

    So, based on what you have stated, if I had to choose today, I would go to a local gun store (or more), and try out as many .243s as I could that fit my budget.  I would buy the one that fit me and my budget the best, and a box of 80 grain Winchester Silver Tip ammo or Remington Core-Lokt ammo.  They're probably as cheap or cheaper than anything you can buy.   Get some good eye and ear protection while you're at it.

    Mount a scope on it, and shoot it until you're comfortable with it.

    If you try ammo with heavier bullets (probably 100 grain), you'll find the recoil a little heavier, but still not bad.  And, the heavier bullets, in my opinion, are better suited for deer sized game.

    The drawback, again in my opinion, is that I would not use a .243 on anything larger than deer.  I know some who have killed elk with a .243, but I don't consider the .243 to be adequate for elk.

    Let us know what you decide on, please.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,877 Senior Member
    The old beat up Ruger 77 243win I had was a laser. One time I was using a spray can lid as long range target. I was not hunting at that time, so I never used to hunt. 
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,250 Senior Member
    For most jobs, it's pretty hard to beat the .243 Win. chambering. 

    Mike
    Yeah, that.  You 6mm Remington is even better, but much hard to find factory ammo.
    That's why I don't normally recommend the 6mm Rem. Unless you handload, you're pretty much limited to factory 100 grain PSPs, and even those are usually tough to find.

    For handloaders, though.....Great choice.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,145 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #44
    My suggestion would be a Tikka or similar lightweight rifle in 7mm08 . The rifle itself is not too heavy to carry for a days hunting, Factory ammunition is available in a wide variety of brands and projectile weights from 120gr up to 150+. Recoil is reasonable and with good shot placement is capable of taking most deer species up to and including big red deer which can weigh up to 4-500lb. ( This is based on my experience at shooting the 7mm08 over the last 20yrs). It is marginal for larger game like elk or moose, but if you get the opportunity to hunt those I am sure you will be able to find someone that will allow you to use  something more suitable.
    My second suggestion is a similar rifle to the above in 243. Again there is a reasonable choice of projectile weights available in factory ammunition which will serve you well.

    I own both calibers and both will do everything I ask of them with good shot placement for the hunting you have mentioned.

    The most important factor for selecting a rifle for you is the comfort and fitting of whichever rifle you decide on. If the rifle doesnt  fit well  from the start,it can be an uphill battle getting something that will serve you well for your type of hunting. Hit the gun stores and handle all sorts of brands until you find something that feels comfortable. When you do find one that fits, handles well and suits you, try and find an example that you can test fire.

    As an aside, I have taken a few women to the range with me to shoot targets with both cals ( 7mmo8 and 243) Nearly all of them felt that the 243 had more  recoil and found the 7mm08 to be more pleasant to shoot.

    ( Disclaimer: both my Tikka's are fitted with suppressors which help mitigate recoil and noise)

    Good luck with your hunt for a suitable rifle.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    snake284 said:
    Jayhawker said:
    There's lots of .270s out there..Damn fine coyote rifles. ...sorry, but I had to do that...   :)
    Aimcat, don't pay any attention to him, he's eaten up with .270 derangement syndrome. There's a lot of that on here. If you want to know about the .270 do a search on Jack O'Connor. LOL!

    Aaannnddd....it worked! Score!!!
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,452 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #46
    Well it depends. If you are talking the coastal yoga variety a standard cartridge will work, but if you are taking inland northern, you can get into dangerous game territory above rt 80 pretty quick due to sheer size and ferocity.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,808 Senior Member
    edited July 2020 #47
    With that budget you have a ton of options available. 

    Cartridge wise, if I were starting brand new today, knowing what I know, I would go 6.5 Creedmoor. Why?
    - Except in the most remote places, ammo is readily available. In most places it's more available than my darling 7mm08
    - Recoil more akin to a .243 than a .308, but arguably more than capable of taking an elk with the right bullet
    - Very good selection of factory ammo at prices similar to a comparable .308 load. 

    Do the .260 and 6.5x55 moderately outperform the 6.5 CM? Sure, but who cares if I can't find the ammo or are paying a significant premium? Not everyone has the time, budget, nor inclination to handload. 

    As far as a rifle, IMO pick your poison. There's tons of great hunting rifles in the $800 range. I personally would be looking at Bergara or Tikka, with a preference towards Bergara because the B-14 uses a lot of Remington 700 components and accessories. 

    Just my 2¢. 
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • mitdr774mitdr774 Member Posts: 1,496 Senior Member


    Do the .260 and 6.5x55 moderately outperform the 6.5 CM? Sure, but who cares if I can't find the ammo or are paying a significant premium? Not everyone has the time, budget, nor inclination to handload. 


    If loaded within book guidelines and staying within SAAMI specs, the order of velocity (slowest to fastest) for a given bullet weight will be 6.5x55, .260, and then 6.5 CM.  The CM is loaded to a higher pressure and is capable of driving bullets to higher velocity.  If handloading to comparable pressure I am sure the old Swede could outperform the CM, but you wont catch me doing that in my M96 rifles.  I dont see a real need to hotrod the Swede as I have seen what it can do even at velocities below what it should be doing.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,877 Senior Member
    edited July 2020 #49
    The one I had was an old battered and forgotten relic on the used gun rack. Back then I didn't keep notes or handload or even have a plan for what I wanted. I just impetuously bought stuff. For whatever reason, maybe the heavy bull barrel. That rifle shot like it was guided be the force......
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,925 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    JohnHDoe said:
    The old beat up Ruger 77 243win I had was a laser. One time I was using a spray can lid as long range target. I was not hunting at that time, so I never used to hunt. 
    I bought a Ruger 77 in .257 Roberts years ago and returned it to Walmart. I had to argue with management to get them to take the gun back. It shot all over the place offhand from the bench at 100 yards and it kicked a bit stout, not as bad as a .308 but still. The wooden forend was pinching the barrel on the right hand-side so it was not centered in the stock perfectly. The young fellow wouldn't take the gun back due to "bad craftsmanship" but a store manager reluctantly made an exception. I then shortly afterward bought a BOSS-equipped Browning A-Bolt II in .25-06. It could stay consistently MOA at 100 yards offhand and had ZERO recoil due to the BOSS on the muzzle. It was loud as hell though, rough on the un-muffed eardrums. Artillery ears at night: ringing after shooting ground squirrels all afternoon without hearing protection. 
    Hmmm...shooting ground squirrels with a .25-06....a bit overgunned wouldn't you say?
    It is a necked down .270...... they probably caught the bullets, stuffed them in their cheeks, and buried them for the winter.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Jayhawker said:
    JohnHDoe said:
    The old beat up Ruger 77 243win I had was a laser. One time I was using a spray can lid as long range target. I was not hunting at that time, so I never used to hunt. 
    I bought a Ruger 77 in .257 Roberts years ago and returned it to Walmart. I had to argue with management to get them to take the gun back. It shot all over the place offhand from the bench at 100 yards and it kicked a bit stout, not as bad as a .308 but still. The wooden forend was pinching the barrel on the right hand-side so it was not centered in the stock perfectly. The young fellow wouldn't take the gun back due to "bad craftsmanship" but a store manager reluctantly made an exception. I then shortly afterward bought a BOSS-equipped Browning A-Bolt II in .25-06. It could stay consistently MOA at 100 yards offhand and had ZERO recoil due to the BOSS on the muzzle. It was loud as hell though, rough on the un-muffed eardrums. Artillery ears at night: ringing after shooting ground squirrels all afternoon without hearing protection. 
    Hmmm...shooting ground squirrels with a .25-06....a bit overgunned wouldn't you say?
    It is a necked down .270...... they probably caught the bullets, stuffed them in their cheeks, and buried them for the winter.
    Don't be silly.  Everyone knows that if you neck a .270 up or down it becomes deadly on all manner of game.  It's only in it's original form that it's a dud. :)
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
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