Home Main Category General Firearms

Yet another newb.

1356710

Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,229 Senior Member
    Don't forget barrel break-in rituals...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Central MNPosts: 14,577 Senior Member
    ..and iced tea and cornbread preparation...
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • AlleyCatAlleyCat Posts: 484 Member
    Twinkle said:

    Question, how can you tell someone has been banned?  Y'all mean there are those kind of people in here?





  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Twinkle said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Welcome hey, we can help you spend money on guns and ammo around here ;)
    Thanks CHIRO!  I'm sure I'll need help!  LOL!
    Does your screen name mean you are a chiropractor?  My chiro is totally my hero!

    Yes.

    We can actually enable you about just about anything you would wish to purchase, up to and including belly dancing tutorials and sewing machines ;)
    Did you forget to use your sarcasm font?

  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Western PAPosts: 8,194 Senior Member
    No, no he didnt.....
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Welcome Aboard!

    Late to the party as always. I blame it on the horse. No gitup and go these days.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Spk said:
    Welcome Aboard!

    Late to the party as always. I blame it on the horse. No gitup and go these days.
    Thanks for showing up Spk and thanks for the welcome.

  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Twinkle said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Welcome hey, we can help you spend money on guns and ammo around here ;)
    Thanks CHIRO!  I'm sure I'll need help!  LOL!
    Does your screen name mean you are a chiropractor?  My chiro is totally my hero!

    Yes.

    We can actually enable you about just about anything you would wish to purchase, up to and including belly dancing tutorials and sewing machines ;)
    Well, thanks for the reassurance.  I know this is going to become an expensive endeavor.  I'll have to turn down the dance tuts and sewing machines, however.  I'm too old and broke down to do much dancing and if I bought another sewing machine, hubby would divorce me!
    What kind of chiropractic do you do?  I go for AO and it has made an incredible difference!

  • zorbazorba Senior Member Merrritt Island, FLPosts: 25,185 Senior Member
    Twinkle said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Twinkle said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Welcome hey, we can help you spend money on guns and ammo around here ;)
    Thanks CHIRO!  I'm sure I'll need help!  LOL!
    Does your screen name mean you are a chiropractor?  My chiro is totally my hero!

    Yes.

    We can actually enable you about just about anything you would wish to purchase, up to and including belly dancing tutorials and sewing machines ;)
    Well, thanks for the reassurance.  I know this is going to become an expensive endeavor.  I'll have to turn down the dance tuts and sewing machines, however.  I'm too old and broke down to do much dancing and if I bought another sewing machine, hubby would divorce me!
    What kind of chiropractic do you do?  I go for AO and it has made an incredible difference!

    Now now, that's no excuse. We had a "baby beginner" celebrate her 88th birthday by doing her first solo Belly Dance onstage at the local club we all danced at. She liked it so much that she did it again for her 89th! She kind of disappeared after that - but we all loved her!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    zorba said:
    Twinkle said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Twinkle said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Welcome hey, we can help you spend money on guns and ammo around here ;)
    Thanks CHIRO!  I'm sure I'll need help!  LOL!
    Does your screen name mean you are a chiropractor?  My chiro is totally my hero!

    Yes.

    We can actually enable you about just about anything you would wish to purchase, up to and including belly dancing tutorials and sewing machines ;)
    Well, thanks for the reassurance.  I know this is going to become an expensive endeavor.  I'll have to turn down the dance tuts and sewing machines, however.  I'm too old and broke down to do much dancing and if I bought another sewing machine, hubby would divorce me!
    What kind of chiropractic do you do?  I go for AO and it has made an incredible difference!

    Now now, that's no excuse. We had a "baby beginner" celebrate her 88th birthday by doing her first solo Belly Dance onstage at the local club we all danced at. She liked it so much that she did it again for her 89th! She kind of disappeared after that - but we all loved her!
    AWWWWWWWWWW!!!!!!!  How inspiring!

  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,528 Senior Member
    First welcome to the crazy house!

    I would like the email address of the fool who said women can't reload so I can sick my wife on him!  BTW she's an amazing shot.

    Every time you shoot save your brass. It's the most expensive part of reloading a cartridge and 32 mag isn't that easy to come by and is expensive. That said, it's the perfect reason to reload. You can save up to 80% rolling you own.

    When I stated reloading 25 years ago 357 mag ammo was $8.50 for 50 rounds. I could load them for $2.38. Alas I didn't save any money, I just shot a lot more.

    I've owned many different manuals through the years and used a lot of different equipment. IMHO you can't beat Lee Precision for a beginner. Its the VW of reloading equipment, it's cheap and it works very well. The Lee reloading manual I have was written very well in a format that was interesting, humerus, and easy to read. Other manuals read like "Technical Manuals", not a lot of fun. You should be able to find a Lee reloading manual on EBay. Get that first and you'll learn a lot about cartridges, bullets and the terminology we use in this sport. The system I bought and used for  20 years was the Lee Anniversary Kit. It has most of what you'll need to get started.

    I will go on my typical rant, BUY A 22 caliber firearm, pistol, revolver and/or rifle. The best thing a newbie can do is learn the basics and practice. 22lr is the cheapest ammo you can get.  You'll learn to enjoy and be proficient with firearms without breaking the bank.  

    The barrel break-in ritual is going to be interesting!


    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Freezer said:
    First welcome to the crazy house!

    I would like the email address of the fool who said women can't reload so I can sick my wife on him!  BTW she's an amazing shot.

    Every time you shoot save your brass. It's the most expensive part of reloading a cartridge and 32 mag isn't that easy to come by and is expensive. That said, it's the perfect reason to reload. You can save up to 80% rolling you own.

    When I stated reloading 25 years ago 357 mag ammo was $8.50 for 50 rounds. I could load them for $2.38. Alas I didn't save any money, I just shot a lot more.

    I've owned many different manuals through the years and used a lot of different equipment. IMHO you can't beat Lee Precision for a beginner. Its the VW of reloading equipment, it's cheap and it works very well. The Lee reloading manual I have was written very well in a format that was interesting, humerus, and easy to read. Other manuals read like "Technical Manuals", not a lot of fun. You should be able to find a Lee reloading manual on EBay. Get that first and you'll learn a lot about cartridges, bullets and the terminology we use in this sport. The system I bought and used for  20 years was the Lee Anniversary Kit. It has most of what you'll need to get started.

    I will go on my typical rant, BUY A 22 caliber firearm, pistol, revolver and/or rifle. The best thing a newbie can do is learn the basics and practice. 22lr is the cheapest ammo you can get.  You'll learn to enjoy and be proficient with firearms without breaking the bank.  

    The barrel break-in ritual is going to be interesting!


    The barrel break-in ritual sounds interesting.  You are the second person here who has mentioned it.  I will have to learn more.
    Yeah, this old boy handed me a very technical looking manual, of which I could make neither heads nor tails, and said after I'd read and could understand it, he'd take me into his shop and teach me to reload.  And then he looked at my brother out of the side of his eye and laughed.  It didn't seem to impress him that I was shooting as accurately as he was on our first outing.  Granted, I took a lot longer than he did to aim my shot, but I put the lead where it needed to go.  Here is my first target.  He drew me the dot with a Sharpie marker.  This was from 45 feet, if I'm not mistaken, with a .22 rifle.  I loved shooting the .22!
    I will keep an eye out for the Lee Manual.  I know I will want more than one manual, because I learn best using different references.
    Sorry, sizing my photos is a little tricky.

  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    And thanks for the welcome, Freezer!  Y'all are a very welcoming bunch!
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Colorado SpringsPosts: 7,801 Senior Member
    Nice targets. Very well done.

    As to reloading manuals, we all have our favorites, and opinions differ. Which is okay. My favorites are....

    #1) Sierra. A bit of a tome, for sure, and they plug their products throughout, but they explain the process better than others I've slogged through. Their "recipes" are kind of conservative though.

    #2) Hornady. Actually my favorite once you've kind of got a slight grasp on the process..

    #3) Lyman, believe it or not. Very basic, allows you to start from zero knowledge without fearing you'll blow your face/hand off.

    I'll get a lot of hate mail for saying this.....but I don't like Lee....in any form. Hardware, books, anything. All in all...pretty rough around the edges.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Nice targets. Very well done.

    As to reloading manuals, we all have our favorites, and opinions differ. Which is okay. My favorites are....

    #1) Sierra. A bit of a tome, for sure, and they plug their products throughout, but they explain the process better than others I've slogged through. Their "recipes" are kind of conservative though.

    #2) Hornady. Actually my favorite once you've kind of got a slight grasp on the process..

    #3) Lyman, believe it or not. Very basic, allows you to start from zero knowledge without fearing you'll blow your face/hand off.

    I'll get a lot of hate mail for saying this.....but I don't like Lee....in any form. Hardware, books, anything. All in all...pretty rough around the edges.

    Mike
    Thanks for that input, Mike.  I'm sure I will refer back to this thread many times as I go through this learning process.  As I mentioned, I like to have as many references as possible.

  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Twinkle said:

    ...
    Yeah, this old boy handed me a very technical looking manual, of which I could make neither heads nor tails, and said after I'd read and could understand it, he'd take me into his shop and teach me to reload.  And then he looked at my brother out of the side of his eye and laughed.  It didn't seem to impress him that I was shooting as accurately as he was on our first outing.  Granted, I took a lot longer than he did to aim my shot, but I put the lead where it needed to go. 
    ...
    I will keep an eye out for the Lee Manual.  I know I will want more than one manual, because I learn best using different references.
    Sorry, sizing my photos is a little tricky.

    Try to get one of these.

    There's older editions out there and they would all work just fine for learning the basics. I have a second edition up in my library and the well illustrated book makes a great teaching tool. It's also still relevant to teaching the basics. Newer editions have newer articles about different more modern cartridges and reloading equipment. Buy it new or used, your choice. Also, this book is nothing close to "technical."
    I have a lot of other technical reloading books on the self now but for teaching basics without causing trepidation get something like the ABC's of Reloading. 👍
    Btw, nice group. Particularly for a newb.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Colorado SpringsPosts: 7,801 Senior Member
    In fact, there's one other book that should be required reading, and I strongly recommend it to anyone in the shooting sports, whether beginner or advanced.

    Robert Rinker's "Understanding Firearms Ballistics" is superb. It covers internal, external, and terminal ballistics (yes....there's 3 types of ballistics), and if you read it only once....you'll understand more than 95% of the gunowners in this world. I've read it cover to cover at least half a dozen times. And its emphasis isn't reloading.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Spk said:
    Twinkle said:

    ...
    Yeah, this old boy handed me a very technical looking manual, of which I could make neither heads nor tails, and said after I'd read and could understand it, he'd take me into his shop and teach me to reload.  And then he looked at my brother out of the side of his eye and laughed.  It didn't seem to impress him that I was shooting as accurately as he was on our first outing.  Granted, I took a lot longer than he did to aim my shot, but I put the lead where it needed to go. 
    ...
    I will keep an eye out for the Lee Manual.  I know I will want more than one manual, because I learn best using different references.
    Sorry, sizing my photos is a little tricky.

    Try to get one of these.

    There's older editions out there and they would all work just fine for learning the basics. I have a second edition up in my library and the well illustrated book makes a great teaching tool. It's also still relevant to teaching the basics. Newer editions have newer articles about different more modern cartridges and reloading equipment. Buy it new or used, your choice. Also, this book is nothing close to "technical."
    I have a lot of other technical reloading books on the self now but for teaching basics without causing trepidation get something like the ABC's of Reloading. 👍
    Btw, nice group. Particularly for a newb.
    That book is indeed in my book list on Amazon.  I think I'll go and order it right now.
    And thanks for the props, folks.

  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 4,712 Senior Member
    I might have missed it but did you ever mention what firearm you .32 H&R Mag was? 
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    sakodude said:
    I might have missed it but did you ever mention what firearm you .32 H&R Mag was? 
    Five shot revolver.

  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    In fact, there's one other book that should be required reading, and I strongly recommend it to anyone in the shooting sports, whether beginner or advanced.

    Robert Rinker's "Understanding Firearms Ballistics" is superb. It covers internal, external, and terminal ballistics (yes....there's 3 types of ballistics), and if you read it only once....you'll understand more than 95% of the gunowners in this world. I've read it cover to cover at least half a dozen times. And its emphasis isn't reloading.

    Mike
    +1

    When you're ready to learn more than just the In's and Out's of reloading get the Rinker book like Mike said.
    I think the newest edition is the 6th. Very good book and lots of great info.

    Sadly, I had a 2nd edition many moons ago and I hated it, too many typos -- particularly with the formulas. Yes, I checked.

    Anyway, the 6th edition has a permanent spot at my home reloading library. With this knowledge you'll able to distinguish between gun Aficionado and Wannabe. Very amusing sometimes to expose the wannabe by using his/her own BS. Mostly, I use it as a filter when someone talks to me about guns. They either know what they're talking about or just blowing smoke.

    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Spk said:
    In fact, there's one other book that should be required reading, and I strongly recommend it to anyone in the shooting sports, whether beginner or advanced.

    Robert Rinker's "Understanding Firearms Ballistics" is superb. It covers internal, external, and terminal ballistics (yes....there's 3 types of ballistics), and if you read it only once....you'll understand more than 95% of the gunowners in this world. I've read it cover to cover at least half a dozen times. And its emphasis isn't reloading.

    Mike
    +1

    When you're ready to learn more than just the In's and Out's of reloading get the Rinker book like Mike said.
    I think the newest edition is the 6th. Very good book and lots of great info.

    Sadly, I had a 2nd edition many moons ago and I hated it, too many typos -- particularly with the formulas. Yes, I checked.

    Anyway, the 6th edition has a permanent spot at my home reloading library. With this knowledge you'll able to distinguish between gun Aficionado and Wannabe. Very amusing sometimes to expose the wannabe by using his/her own BS. Mostly, I use it as a filter when someone talks to me about guns. They either know what they're talking about or just blowing smoke.

    Wow!  So much to learn!  I fear that I'll miss something.  It's kind of overwhelming, but I'll come back to these conversations with more and more understanding as I get more deeply into it.
    Thanks!

  • zorbazorba Senior Member Merrritt Island, FLPosts: 25,185 Senior Member
    Here's another tip for shooting - NOT that I'm the Goddess's gift to the sport, but it helped me considerably when I was first starting. Modified Belly Dance posture: Soft knees, shoulders back and down, chest lifted. Legs further apart than we'd do in dance though.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    zorba said:
    Here's another tip for shooting - NOT that I'm the Goddess's gift to the sport, but it helped me considerably when I was first starting. Modified Belly Dance posture: Soft knees, shoulders back and down, chest lifted. Legs further apart than we'd do in dance though.
    I will remember this.  It's a natural enough posture for me.

  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Central FLPosts: 2,122 Senior Member
    Twinkle said:
    The barrel break-in ritual sounds interesting.  You are the second person here who has mentioned it.  I will have to learn more.

    There are different variations of the barrel break-in ritual but most of them involve loincloths and juggling dancing chipmunks under a full moon.....
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Merrritt Island, FLPosts: 25,185 Senior Member
    Twinkle said:
    The barrel break-in ritual sounds interesting.  You are the second person here who has mentioned it.  I will have to learn more.

    There are different variations of the barrel break-in ritual but most of them involve loincloths and juggling dancing chipmunks under a full moon.....
    ... on fire!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Okay, I'm beginning to sense that the barrel break-in ritual is something like a snipe hunt?
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Twinkle said:
    Okay, I'm beginning to sense that the barrel break-in ritual is something like a snipe hunt?
    It's kinda like this only isolated, under a full moon with uncooperative chipmunks.

    No one really knows why it works or if it works at all but many folks swear by it.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Central FLPosts: 2,122 Senior Member
    Twinkle said:
    Okay, I'm beginning to sense that the barrel break-in ritual is something like a snipe hunt?

    Yep!  You catch on quick!  :D
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    Twinkle said:
    Okay, I'm beginning to sense that the barrel break-in ritual is something like a snipe hunt?

    Yep!  You catch on quick!  :D
    Well, I did go hunting online and found what looks like a couple of very credible articles on the subject.  Y'all had me going for a minute!

Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement