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Firearms trivia thread.

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Replies

  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    Good thinking, but you're both wrong.  Bearcat may be a significant word, though.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,769 Senior Member
    I'm thinking maybe the Ruger Super Blackhawk was in 1970?
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 22,256 Senior Member
    I think the Super Blackhawk came later, so the original Blackhawk maybe
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    I've been down this rabbit hole for over an hour and still haven't found what I think is the right answer!

    I have learned read and learned lot! 
    Good one!
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,600 Senior Member
    Ruger Hawkeye?
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    edited July 31 #1417
    Actually, this may be the naming factor in the Ruger Bearcat.

    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,257 Senior Member
    Can't remember the name but was it the single shot in 30 Carbine??
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    I feel I may have been leading you all down the garden path, so to speak.  What I'm thinking on is not a firearm...it's the Ruger Automobile.  Roughly visually based on the Stutz Bearcat, a modern 1970 version with a 427 engine.  Three were built, and you can see one if you google Ruger Automobile.

    Arthur Savage invented the radial tire,  Bill Ruger addressed his love for classic automobiles with the Ruger Automobile.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    Big Al1 said:
    Can't remember the name but was it the single shot in 30 Carbine??
    You might be thinking about the Ruger Hawkeye single shot pistol. It was made in 63-64 chambered in 256 Win. Mag.

    Cool piece! Ruger Hawkeye - Wikipedia
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,257 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    I feel I may have been leading you all down the garden path, so to speak.  What I'm thinking on is not a firearm...it's the Ruger Automobile.  Roughly visually based on the Stutz Bearcat, a modern 1970 version with a 427 engine.  Three were built, and you can see one if you google Ruger Automobile.

    Arthur Savage invented the radial tire,  Bill Ruger addressed his love for classic automobiles with the Ruger Automobile.
    I coulda' had a V8!!  B)
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    I feel I may have been leading you all down the garden path, so to speak.  
    And right down the rabbit hole! I've been reading off and on most of the morning! Thanks, I think?
    At least I learned something.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    Since you steered us wrong, pun intended, I'll throw another out.

    What is the oldest military cartridge still in use and what is it chambered for?
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    edited July 31 #1424
    9mm?  And chambered for just about everything now, but originally for the P08 Luger.







    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    Nope! 
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    7.62 x 54 M-N?
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    edited July 31 #1427
    Caliber (7.62x54r) is correct! In what firearm is it currently used?
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,705 Senior Member
    M-110 SDMR
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    edited July 31 #1429
    Nope M-110 is 7.62x51 NATO, similar to 308. 7.62x54r is a commie round. It was originally chambered for the Mosin Nagant bolt action rifle but the Ruskies still have a weapon chambered in this cartridge making it the oldest military round still in use.

    This is what I learned on one episode of "Stories of the gun"
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,769 Senior Member
    Im thinking its maybe a belt fed machine gun. 

    Not a guess as I don't know one buzz saw from the next. Just thinking out loud.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 22,256 Senior Member
    AKM
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    edited August 1 #1432
    Im thinking its maybe a belt fed machine gun. 

    Not a guess as I don't know one buzz saw from the next. Just thinking out loud.
    Close enough! Its the Russian PK and later the PKM, a belt fed machinegun. The dang thing just works and the Russkies never found a good reason to replace it or the round. They were tooled for it and had a huge stock pile of ammo. Both the round and machinegun worked, are cheap and easy to produce. It's not very accurate but it put lead down range. Today they are looking for a replacement but we haven't drifted far from the 06 or Mr. Brownings designs.

    7.62x54r went into service in 1891 and is still in use today making it the oldest cartridge still in use.

    your up earlyagain
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,769 Senior Member
    edited August 1 #1433
    It's a pretty good cartridge. Ive read just a bit about the mechanical workings of machine guns. They're very interesting. It seemed like a rim cartridge would be good in a belt.

    What was the nickname of the very first Webley revolver? So derived from the shape of the hammer.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    The Dragunov also shoots the 7,62x54
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    Ok, I like it I learned something and found some good reading material.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,769 Senior Member
    Guess no one reads the magazine?

    Featured in this last issue, reviewed by James. The first Webley was a percussion piece, refered to as the longspur because of the hammer shape on the revolver.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
     I had an interesting read about the history of that evolver and company. I handled one many years ago while visiting Teach. 
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    Freezer said:
     I had an interesting read about the history of that evolver and company. I handled one many years ago while visiting Teach. 

    Is that the one Teach had that the barrel had been sawed down?
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,115 Senior Member
    edited August 3 #1439
    Yes, I questioned him about the short barrel but he said that it was not sawed off, it was original. I've seen a few Webley s but none with a barrel that short. It looks like it could be a MK1

    A Webley Mark I Revolver, circa 1887, from Canada, cal .455 (Mk I) Webley

    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,351 Senior Member
    Back when you could buy one of these through the mail, someone imported tons of them and sawed the barrels off for resale in the US.  I read this or saw it, don't think the Webley ever made a super=short revolver.  They may have rechambered them to .38 S&W from .380, can't remember.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,645 Senior Member
    edited August 4 #1441
    Gene L said:
    Back when you could buy one of these through the mail, someone imported tons of them and sawed the barrels off for resale in the US.  I read this or saw it, don't think the Webley ever made a super=short revolver.  They may have rechambered them to .38 S&W from .380, can't remember.
    Sure they did...The Webley British Bulldog...2.5" barrel chambered in one of 3 .40 cal.+ cartridges...Made famous in "The Wind and The Lion" British diplomat defending himself against sword wielding Arabs

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
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