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Soon to be gunowner questions

ThatPunkGirlThatPunkGirl Posts: 7 New Member
Hello all
I am looking at purchasing a firearm for safety and home defense reasons, what mm should I stick to as a first time gun owner?

I've heard good things about 9mm's but I want to know as much as I can before I drop the hammer on a big purchase. 

Replies

  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,706 Senior Member
    Welcome to the forum.  9mm is one of many possible answers.  Trying to recommend a firearm and chambering to a new shooter on an online forum is TOUGH.  Not knowing your background with firearms, your tolerance to recoil, your ability to learn and many other factors it’s like having a dart game in the dark.  Any chance you can give us at least a short summary of ANY firearms experience you might have?
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,203 Senior Member
    Listen to this guy...he knows what he's talking about...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,128 Senior Member
    The internet is a hodge podge of varying types, quantity, and quality of information. Wanting to know as much about guns as possible is good. It is a very large subject though. It would be better to narrow and prioritize the quest for information. Help along those lines can begin here. Like everything, it starts simple and basic.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,557 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    Welcome to the forum.  9mm is one of many possible answers.  Trying to recommend a firearm and chambering to a new shooter on an online forum is TOUGH.  Not knowing your background with firearms, your tolerance to recoil, your ability to learn and many other factors it’s like having a dart game in the dark.  Any chance you can give us at least a short summary of ANY firearms experience you might have?
    Jayhawker said:
    Listen to this guy...he knows what he's talking about...
    What they said ^^^

    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,200 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    Welcome to the forum.  9mm is one of many possible answers.  Trying to recommend a firearm and chambering to a new shooter on an online forum is TOUGH.  Not knowing your background with firearms, your tolerance to recoil, your ability to learn and many other factors it’s like having a dart game in the dark.  Any chance you can give us at least a short summary of ANY firearms experience you might have?

    If you have a chance, find a range that rents or otherwise let's you try before you buy and try, not only, different guns but different calibers as well. Find something you like, that fits your hand, that you can grip well, that you can rack the slide easily, that's reliable, that you can shoot well and something you're likely to practice with. All these things are important.
    You're a soon to be, first time gun owner but what guns, if any, have you shot in the past?
    Like GunNut said, any info on your past firearm experiences would be very helpful.


    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,989 Senior Member
    Now is not the best market time to buy a gun, but that may not be a consideration if you need a gun.  Everyone needs a gun, though.  Experience means a lot but it's something you can't buy, unlike purchasing a gun.

    Probably, in centerfire handguns, a 9mm should be considered.  And nowadays, they're all so similar that you can't go too far wrong with a Glock, a Sig, a S&W, or even a Taurus  (yes, I said a Taurus.)  Or a Ruger or a Kel Tec in smaller pistols that aren't necessarily kind to new shooters as they kick.

    So there is pleasure in shopping around and pleasure in shooting.  The current ammo shortage is another impediment to First Firearm buyers.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,867 Senior Member
    edited April 8 #8
    Our first amendment rights come with a responsibilities. Knowing the gun laws in your area, learning how to exercise these rights and a operate a firearm are very important. I wouldn't hand a chain saw to someone who never used one. A firearm is only a tool in the hands of the user. If you don't use it well, it will end in disaster.

    This is a great website with knowledgeable folks. Gun Nut is probably one  the most qualified firearms educators you could find on the net. 
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,989 Senior Member
    Second Amendment, although the First is very important too.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,706 Senior Member
    You guys are making me blush.  ☺️  

    I just pass along what knowledge my betters have blessed me with...
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,867 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    Second Amendment, although the First is very important too.
    I screwed that up  :* I meant to say with our constitutional rights come responsibilities. Our right to vote means we have the responsibility to vote. We have the right of free speech but can't yell fire in a theater. I don't under stand the hate speech thing. We have the right to bear arms but have a responsibility to society to learn how to use them responsibly and within the confines of the law even if we don't agree with them, we still have the right to vote.  
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,437 Senior Member
    Hello all
    I am looking at purchasing a firearm for safety and home defense reasons, what mm should I stick to as a first time gun owner?

    I've heard good things about 9mm's but I want to know as much as I can before I drop the hammer on a big purchase. 
    Welcome,

    some info that has been provided is something you should consider.

    however... some hints/thoughts.... dont know if they have been covered but im putting this out there anyway...

     > look for a trainer.   If you are more comfortable with a female? trainer, then seek one out.  

     > if you dont know who to ask, then go to a gun shop and ask if they know of anyone.

     > google is your friend too.  remember that.  Not just for this, but you can search for alot of info.  it doesnt mean you MUST take it as GOSPEL.  use your common sense.

     > ask questions to the trainer if you have any questions/concerns...ect.

     > the LAST thing i would do is to buy a gun.  That will come later, but you should understand what you are doing.

     > understand the RAMIFICATIONS if you end up using that gun.  

     > some places have the "castle doctrine", or "stand your ground" but you need to be asking your local officials what will happen to you if you end up using that gun.

     > Then, if you dont see yourself as "shoot to kill" person or if you think you will just "wing em" like they did in the western, again, you may want to talk to the trainer about this and get their take.

     > And handle as many guns and shoot as many as you can.  

     > This is whats funny about people.  You are not alone and are not the only person wanting to do or this.  Ask any trusted friends/family if they have a gun to try/shoot.   Get their take on things and what they have the gun for.    

    > EVERYONE will have an OPINION on this and you will need to figure out what will work for you and what you want to do or your "End game"

     > ;you may want to review/read this site....

    https://www.corneredcat.com/

    many other things to consdier too..

    good luck
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,159 Senior Member
    Maybe it's already been mentioned, but "mm" typically refers to semi-auto handguns.  Keep an open mind to revolvers, too, such as .38 special.  If you have small hands, you might find one that is more suitable to you.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,989 Senior Member
    Freezer said:
    Gene L said:
    Second Amendment, although the First is very important too.
    I screwed that up  :* I meant to say with our constitutional rights come responsibilities. Our right to vote means we have the responsibility to vote. We have the right of free speech but can't yell fire in a theater. I don't under stand the hate speech thing. We have the right to bear arms but have a responsibility to society to learn how to use them responsibly and within the confines of the law even if we don't agree with them, we still have the right to vote.  

    I hear what you're saying, Freezer, but would hate to see a personal responsibility codified.  Would hate to see a law forcing you to vote, likewise would hate to see a law requiring a training course necessary in order to buy a gun, for example.  That is to an extent a gun control measure when others make laws the law abiding rest of us must obey.  I know you don't mean that and agree as gun owners (experienced gun owners) we should know how to use them responsibly, just wouldn't want to see that a necessity made into law.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,867 Senior Member
    We're on the same page Gene. My take on responsibility is, it is a person thing not to be forced on someone. A guess a better way to say it is "moral responsibility". Like a chain saw, a gun is a tool, I would encourage anyone who doesn't know how to used it to seek instruction before handling it and rule concerning it's use, don't cut down your neighbor's tree! I like this web site because unlike You tube none of us would encourage a newbie to shoot a shoulderbustntoothrattlingearsplitter as their first exposure to firearms, responsibility.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,706 Senior Member
    The advise to look for a trainer is sound.  When you do, at the very least look for two things:

    Certifications/Experience:  There are a lot of folks that KNOW how to DO "stuff" (military and LE) but that does not mean they KNOW how to TEACH stuff.  It requires pretty intensive training to learn how to TEACH folks in a way that will allow them to convert information into knowledge and skills.  Look for legit certifications.  NRA and some states give them to instructors they have trained with them but there are others that have much higher standards than those organizations so do your research.  I hate to say this but the NRA which is a highly respected organization will give a teaching certificate to anyone that writes a check, stays in the classroom long enough to pass and and doesn't put a hole on their trainer during the shooting certification which is a whole 50 rounds.  Most states have an even lower bar.  

    Also look for someone that has been training more that a few weeks.  The current climate has bred a bumper crop of folks with zero experience training getting into the "business" and it takes nothing to print some cards and try to go out and take money from folks that don't know any better.  Also beware of "high speed" trainers that are trying to teach you things that are way above their pay grade and your skills.  The first red flag is when your trainer spends more time "demonstrating" his skills than teaching you anything.

    Reviews:  Look at Google reviews of your trainer, they do matter and you'll find out right quick who is providing good training and who is not.  BUT also remember that everything needs to be taken with a grain of salt.  Folks manufacture reviews for themselves and in some cases the reviewers has no other experience with firearms or training so to them a trainer might be great but then again he/she is the only one they've ever experienced so they have no point of reference.

    When you pick a trainer ask a LOT of questions about EVERYTHING.  That way you'll get your money's worth, you'll also get to gage the level of competence and confidence the trainer has in his abilities.  And if you her something that makes no sense to you or makes you feel unsafe it's ok to ask for your money back and find someone else.  No trainer is a god on the range and there are very few ABSOLUTES about how to get things done.




    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,200 Senior Member
    Good instructor, Safe, clearly understood (a teacher), knowledgeable and patient.

    Not so good instructor.
    "Look how freakin' awesome I am! If you can be just half as good as me, you might survive." 🤣

    I've seen instructors that try to teach newbies this way and while the students are entertained, I doubt they learn very much.
    Good for you if you're really good with a firearm but teaching new gun owners advanced (read things they're not ready for) techniques, can actually do damage to the self confidence you're trying to develop within the new student. The D.I. approach isn't for everyone.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,128 Senior Member
    edited April 10 #18
    The OP probly went and got shiny new 9mm..

    I read somewhere its the most common self defense weapon.....

    All journeys start with the first gun?
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,706 Senior Member
    And you have to be highly adaptable.  There is no way you can teach the same way to a 50 year old first time gun owning female than how you handle a 30 year old recently separated Marine.  It tough to make them both happy...
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

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