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Welding

JayJay Senior MemberPosts: 4,367 Senior Member
edited August 2021 in Clubhouse #1
I started learning the basics of welding as a teenager, building pipe fences and horse pens with a guy where I worked at the time. I learned a little more in high school ag classes with a lot more hands on welding using different processes. Fast forward 25 years, I've used some of that knowledge now and then for repairs and projects here and there. But I haven't done it nearly enough to be anywhere close to proficient.

Recently I've rekindled my interest in welding and started purchasing some equipment. While I wish I had the budget to buy higher end, American made machines, I just don't right now. There are a lot of tested and reviewed Chinese made machines on the market these days that are REALLY nice, good working machines. Including the Vulcan brand from Harbor Freight, among others. Plus, inverter technology has come a LONG ways in the last 10 years and these new compact inverter machines can do so much more in such a small package. I spent some time researching some machines and went with a good balance of features and good reviews for longevity and performance. Another very important aspect is that they use common consumables. I didn't want to buy a machine that used proprietary parts that I might not be able to get later. So the welders I got use the same standard DINSE connectors and consumables used by popular name brand machines.

So, I first purchased a Vulcan Omnipro 220 from Harbor Freight. When you think Harbor Freight, you usually think "cheap," which is usually true. This machine cost just about $1200. So, not cheap. They've been around quite a few years now and have been used and reviewed a lot.  The Omnipro is a multiprocess inverter machine capable of doing mig, flux core and stick welding out of the box and can do tig and spool gun with the required equipment purchased separately. I've already used this machine on 115v power as a flux core wire feed to build a 16'x24' metal shade at my place. Worked great. The down side to this machine is, it's DC only. So you really can't tig weld aluminum with it. So I considered getting the spool gun, but I really wanted tig capability. Which led me to my next welder.


I got hooked on watching weld.com videos on youtube, learning a few things here and there.  One of the machines they reviewed and use in their school is the AHP Alphatig 203. It is also an inverter machine capable of AC and DC tig and stick welding. I picked one up for about $800 total. I haven't had a chance to use it yet. I just bought an assortment of tungsten electrodes and filler rods for it to get started with, but I still need to get my tanks of shielding gas. It comes with the full setup for tig and stick welding, including a foot pedal for optional use on the tig process as well as a switch that can be mounted on the tig torch to turn it on and off. It is a swivel head torch, standard #17 size.


My plan is to keep the Vulcan set up as a wire feed machine with a bottle of 25%/75%, CO2/Argon mix. The Alphatig will be set up as a tig and stick welder with a bottle of pure Argon.

I also needed something to cut metal with. While the good old oxi/fuel method would have worked, I picked up a little inverter plasma cutter for a great price.  About $450 when it was all said and done. I also used this to build the metal shade I mentioned before and it worked perfectly on 115v power. And I don't have to have tanks refilled or exchanged. Just plug it in, run an air line from my air compressor to it and go.


Anyway, long story about my recent trip into learning more about welding. I'm looking forward to getting the gas tanks and learning as I go.  Feel free to discuss experience, interest or anything else you care to share about welding and the like. 

Also, why do I always chose the expensive hobbies...  :D
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Replies

  • buckaroobuckaroo Posts: 67 Member
    edited August 2021 #2
    I wish I'd a learn even the basics.   In my humble opinion welding is perhaps the best skill trade one can have.   You really have to know what you're doing once you get into the critical area's of welding, it can mean life or death.

    But as a do it your selfer the use of welding is endless, from car to home, to farm/ranch you name it.   Back in the day at the high-schools they use to have vocational education/shop class, taught just about everything.   Those days are gone.

    Now it's dope rolling, how to sue someone and pretend you are a victim of something, later on changing your name to Sally.  :)

    Anyway don't feel ashamed the commies made it, what real choice do we have right.   Even our underwear is made some place else.  As long as you can get parts for it and Harbor Freight stands behind it without a fortune in shipping cost.

    However error on the side of caution buying any guns made over there or any vehicles in the future now that several manufactures are building theirs over there.

    If I have a problem with my Ruger they'll take care of it quick right here in the States and free shipping.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,219 Senior Member
    Jay said:
    I started learning the basics of welding as a teenager, building pipe fences and horse pens with a guy where I worked at the time. I learned a little more in high school ag classes with a lot more hands on welding using different processes. Fast forward 25 years, I've used some of that knowledge now and then for repairs and projects here and there. But I haven't done it nearly enough to be anywhere close to proficient.

    Recently I've rekindled my interest in welding and started purchasing some equipment. While I wish I had the budget to buy higher end, American made machines, I just don't right now. There are a lot of tested and reviewed Chinese made machines on the market these days that are REALLY nice, good working machines. Including the Vulcan brand from Harbor Freight, among others. Plus, inverter technology has come a LONG ways in the last 10 years and these new compact inverter machines can do so much more in such a small package. I spent some time researching some machines and went with a good balance of features and good reviews for longevity and performance. Another very important aspect is that they use common consumables. I didn't want to buy a machine that used proprietary parts that I might not be able to get later. So the welders I got use the same standard DINSE connectors and consumables used by popular name brand machines.

    So, I first purchased a Vulcan Omnipro 220 from Harbor Freight. When you think Harbor Freight, you usually think "cheap," which is usually true. This machine cost just about $1200. So, not cheap. They've been around quite a few years now and have been used and reviewed a lot.  The Omnipro is a multiprocess inverter machine capable of doing mig, flux core and stick welding out of the box and can do tig and spool gun with the required equipment purchased separately. I've already used this machine on 115v power as a flux core wire feed to build a 16'x24' metal shade at my place. Worked great. The down side to this machine is, it's DC only. So you really can't tig weld aluminum with it. So I considered getting the spool gun, but I really wanted tig capability. Which led me to my next welder.


    I got hooked on watching weld.com videos on youtube, learning a few things here and there.  One of the machines they reviewed and use in their school is the AHP Alphatig 203. It is also an inverter machine capable of AC and DC tig and stick welding. I picked one up for about $800 total. I haven't had a chance to use it yet. I just bought an assortment of tungsten electrodes and filler rods for it to get started with, but I still need to get my tanks of shielding gas. It comes with the full setup for tig and stick welding, including a foot pedal for optional use on the tig process as well as a switch that can be mounted on the tig torch to turn it on and off. It is a swivel head torch, standard #17 size.


    My plan is to keep the Vulcan set up as a wire feed machine with a bottle of 25%/75%, CO2/Argon mix. The Alphatig will be set up as a tig and stick welder with a bottle of pure Argon.

    I also needed something to cut metal with. While the good old oxi/fuel method would have worked, I picked up a little inverter plasma cutter for a great price.  About $450 when it was all said and done. I also used this to build the metal shade I mentioned before and it worked perfectly on 115v power. And I don't have to have tanks refilled or exchanged. Just plug it in, run an air line from my air compressor to it and go.


    Anyway, long story about my recent trip into learning more about welding. I'm looking forward to getting the gas tanks and learning as I go.  Feel free to discuss experience, interest or anything else you care to share about welding and the like. 

    Also, why do I always chose the expensive hobbies...  :D
    Because you're a guy, otherwise you'd be pissing your money away on expensive shoes and make-up...  :D

    Welding is something that has intrigued me for a long time and maybe I'll dive into next year, so I'll be following your thread for sure!
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member


    Also, why do I always chose the expensive hobbies...  :D
    Because you're a guy, otherwise you'd be pissing your money away on expensive shoes and make-up...  :D

    Welding is something that has intrigued me for a long time and maybe I'll dive into next year, so I'll be following your thread for sure!
    This is true!!! 

    One of the things I really like about the inverter technology in these machines is the ability to run them on 115v or 230v. Of course, when running on 115v your available amperage output and duty cycle are reduced a lot. But on a 30 or 40 amp breaker, they can still do just about everything I need them to do. Plus, I have two small inverter generators for my RV, which I can run parallel and power any of my welders and plasma cutter, making them easily portable. I also have my dad's Lincoln generator/stick welder. So I've pretty much got the means to cut and weld metal using multiple processes wherever I want to do it. Might give me something to do with my time after I retire in about 4 years... 
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    Here's a few pics of the shade I built with the help of my BIL and a buddy a couple months ago. It appears my dog thinks we built it just for her..

    It was built completely using stuff I had laying around, except the metal roof panels. So I ended up with $600 in the whole thing.

    I had the Omnipro and plasma cutter as well as the rest of my tools in the back of my SxS. So all I had to to was pull it where I needed it, roll everything out and get started. I also completed it on one side and worked toward the other so we could put roof panels on as I went, providing some shade at the work area. It was about 103-105 degrees the days we worked on it.









  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,219 Senior Member
    That’s nice work!  With my upcoming move to more spacious surroundings one of my priorities will be putting on some outbuilding type structures probably even before the house is built.  I never thought about steel!  That would make them storm proof for sure!  Hummmmm…
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    Thanks. That one has been through 60+ MPH wind and around 8 inches of rain since it's been up. No leaks and hasn't budged a bit. I still need to clean it up and paint it.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,219 Senior Member
    Jay said:
    Thanks. That one has been through 60+ MPH wind and around 8 inches of rain since it's been up. No leaks and hasn't budged a bit. I still need to clean it up and paint it.
    Man you're giving me a bunch of ideas!  THANKS!
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    Jay said:
    Thanks. That one has been through 60+ MPH wind and around 8 inches of rain since it's been up. No leaks and hasn't budged a bit. I still need to clean it up and paint it.
    Man you're giving me a bunch of ideas!  THANKS!
    Cool.  No problem. 

    That shade has been designed in my head for years. Dad and I talked about it many times and just never got around to it. This year has been a year of getting stuff done. For me and my dad, in my mind. The shipping container that will become my man cave was another project dad and I never did. If lumber prices come down, that will be a project for this fall or winter. Then a new house and 30x40 steel shop building by next summer.

    The plan for the shade has always been in phases in my mind. Complete the roof, then frame out the bottom and build a deck and put up a ceiling fan. Once that's done, I'll frame in walls, cover the bottom 3 feet with wood planks and screen the top all the way around. If I'm ever able to get enough water to fill the pond (tank) back up, it'll be a cool place to hang out. For right now, the pond is the archery course..  :D
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,219 Senior Member
    Jay said:
    Jay said:
    Thanks. That one has been through 60+ MPH wind and around 8 inches of rain since it's been up. No leaks and hasn't budged a bit. I still need to clean it up and paint it.
    Man you're giving me a bunch of ideas!  THANKS!
    Cool.  No problem. 

    That shade has been designed in my head for years. Dad and I talked about it many times and just never got around to it. This year has been a year of getting stuff done. For me and my dad, in my mind. The shipping container that will become my man cave was another project dad and I never did. If lumber prices come down, that will be a project for this fall or winter. Then a new house and 30x40 steel shop building by next summer.

    The plan for the shade has always been in phases in my mind. Complete the roof, then frame out the bottom and build a deck and put up a ceiling fan. Once that's done, I'll frame in walls, cover the bottom 3 feet with wood planks and screen the top all the way around. If I'm ever able to get enough water to fill the pond (tank) back up, it'll be a cool place to hang out. For right now, the pond is the archery course..  :D
    Very Cool!  Hey FWIW I just heard the price of lumber locally is down about 70%!  Not quite back to before panic but close...
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,734 Senior Member
    At my best I was able to use a Lincoln "Buzz Box" to get two pieces of cold rolled stick together.
    There was a French dude named Pierre that used to drop by.
    I'll always remember his words of wisdom:
    "A grinder and paint make me the welder I ain't"
    I've proven that more than once.
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    I've heard that saying.  :D Nothing wrong with that. My welds are far from great looking at the moment, for sure. 

    Step one, make the metal stick together. Step two, do better at it.

    As one of the instructors on weld.com says, make every weld better than your last. 
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,912 Senior Member
    I started with a Hobart 190 MIG welder that came with the aluminum spool gun and standard MIG torch for $900. It runs on 230V only. I had my work shed fitted with a 230V circuit after it was put up. It is capable of MIG welding ( or flux) Steel, Aluminum and Stainless Steel. My welding proficiency is getting better, but not where I want it to be, and I have spent a LOT more money on accessory tools and equipment than my skill level requires, but once I get better at welding, all these extras will come in handy. I would love to get a Plasma cutter that does stick and TIG too, but that will be much later on.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    I considered one of those multi process plasma cutters. The ones I glanced at were pretty pricey. At least the ones that are AC and DC. When all you have to do to change processes is twist DINSE connectors in and out, that’s not bad. On the MiG, it can be a little bit more work to swap stuff around. That’s why I went with separate machines. I don’t have to remove my mig stuff and change gas bottles to change processes. That was my thinking, anyway. 
  • JustsomedudeJustsomedude Posts: 1,319 Senior Member
    I taught myself every form of welding that I know. Started gas welding, stick, mig and then tig. All have their advantages and disadvantages. The one thing that all have in common which affects the look and quality of the weld is how far you keep your electrode, tip or tungsten from the parts you're welding. When using mig, if your maintaining proper wire length and the welder is spuddering, either your voltage is too low or wire speed to slow. If you do decide to start in TIG, do yourself a favor and get a high frequency start. Scratch starting with an inverter machine does work but it's a pain in the butt.
    We've been conditioned to believe that obedience is virtuous and voting is freedom- 
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,912 Senior Member
    Jay said:
    I considered one of those multi process plasma cutters. The ones I glanced at were pretty pricey. At least the ones that are AC and DC. When all you have to do to change processes is twist DINSE connectors in and out, that’s not bad. On the MiG, it can be a little bit more work to swap stuff around. That’s why I went with separate machines. I don’t have to remove my mig stuff and change gas bottles to change processes. That was my thinking, anyway. 

    I don't know how they do it for $400, but this machine is very highly rated by the buyers, and is what I would buy when I'm ready:

    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    edited August 2021 #17
    It is pretty interesting how they can put these inverter machines out there so inexpensively.

    On that particular one, it's a DC only machine. While they make the claim it can weld aluminum, and I'm sure it can, AC is much preferred for aluminum TIG welding. It also doesn't say if it's a high frequency start machine, but since on of the Q&A questions indicates it does not have pilot arc on the plasma cutter, I would assume the TIG is scratch start.  Still not bad for a hobbyist welder if you're not looking to have good aluminum welding ability. It seems when you get into AC/DC machines, they start to hit more in the $600-$1000 range.
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,912 Senior Member
    You seem to know a lot about some of the technical issues of these welding machines. I am just a novice at this without formal training, other than what I can get from youtube, the manual that came with my Hobart MIG and some other internet sources. If I bought the machine I linked to above, it would be for learning the basics of the different types of welding, and not use it for any kind of high demand work or materials. I was interested in it for just the plasma feature, but given it had the stick and TIG capability as well, it seemed to be a bargain for the machine at $400.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    edited August 2021 #19
    I definitely still have a lot to learn. I have a little bit of a grasp on some of the technical stuff. But I also know there's much more I don't know than what I do. 

    That is definitely an affordable machine that would probably do just fine for most light duty home shop stuff. As long as you're not intending to use the TIG function as an aluminum welder, I'm sure it would be fine. You mentioned having the spool gun setup already for your aluminum welding. That DC machine should weld different kinds of steel just fine. If you do go for it, watch which kinds of tungsten you get. Some might not work well on DC. Also, for around $100 more, you can find decent multi process machines that have high frequency start and pilot arc. IMO, it's worth at least taking a look at.

    There were some things I was specifically looking for when I got the AlphaTig and I already had the plasma cutter when I bought it. I wanted an AC/DC output machine so I could weld steel and aluminum. I also preferred to have one with frequency and balance tuning capability. Having the pulse function is also nice. I also prefer high frequency start as opposed to lift or scratch start. This machine not only has all of that as manual adjustments, it also has rapid set menus. Choose the tungsten diameter, metal type and thickness and the machine gives you starting settings to get going. You can fine tune it from there. I like that with my limited knowledge and experience at the moment. And if I do get a little more experienced, it has plenty of tuning capability to custom set it for whatever I want.

    https://ahpwelds.com/product/ahp-alphatig-203xi

  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    edited August 2021 #20
    This is pretty much the same plasma cutter as mine, but with the DC TIG and stick options. It would be about $600 for the 50A combo machine.

    https://www.amicoelectric.com/product/cts-200,plasma-cutter-hf-tig-stick-arc-3-in-1-combo-dc-welder-50-amp-plasma-cutter-200-amp-hf-tig-welder-200-amp-stick-arc-welding/

    It has high frequency start for the plasma cutter and TIG. My plasma cutter was $379 plus I paid $30 for an optional 3 year free replacement warranty.

    The 30A combo machines are around $500.

    https://www.amicoelectric.com/product/cts-160-plasma-cutter-hf-tig-stick-arc-3-in-1-combo-dc-welder-30-amp-plasma-cutter-160-amp-hf-tig-welder-140-amp-stick-arc-welding/
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,912 Senior Member
    edited August 2021 #21
    I really like that CTS-160 welder. It does everything I wanted in a combo machine, and is only $100 more. Thanks for your guidance, as I can use all the help I can get. Fortunately, I have a welding supply company located not far from where I live. I can get gasses and other welding supplies, and the people are friendly and very willing to give me advice on what accessories to buy. There is a metal supply company about 20 miles from me. A bit of a longer drive, but I found them to be friendly and helpful as well.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • dlddld Member Posts: 456 Member
    our community college offer a welding class, you might take a look at yours and see it they have one.
    Twenty five years ago I took tig, mig and stick at one but hardly weld any more.
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,694 Senior Member
    I had a MIG welder for awhile. Had it long enough to get a 8 point cage and subframe connectors in my Mustang (BIL did actual welds).

    My stepson went to vocational school for welding. Must be pretty good. Every time he takes a welding test for an employer they hound him to come work for them. Had his pick of three jobs when he moved to Atlanta.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    Welding is definitely a skill that is in demand in so many different ways. From factories and fab shops to the oil fields and mobile welding, fence building and repair work, there's plenty of work and money to be made.  I've considered enrolling in some welding classes here after I retire. My son and nephew both were able to take welding classes in high school. They got into programs through their high school that allowed them to go to the community college part of the school day for welding classes and get credit for them. My son got a good job right out of high school in a factory building fire trucks and has done very well. He's planning to go back to school and get an engineering degree. My nephew is more of a wanderer and has moved around a lot from place to place, job to job, not quite landing a big or stable job yet. More of a "I'm moving over there. A friend of a friend's dad has a construction business there..." And it generally doesn't work out the way he thought. But he's figuring it out and doing ok. He seems to be able to find work pretty easily wherever he is.  
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,912 Senior Member
    There is a tech college near me that has welding as one of their curriculums, but at best I would just want to audit some specific classes. I'm too old for taking a years worth of classes that would lead to certification and a job. That is not what I'm after. What I want to do is to be able to make pretty welds on stuff and be able to set the controls correctly to help make them that way. I have thought of going to the school admin and ask if I could audit specific classes to learn techniques and do some fab work. I have heard that a good welder can make over a 100K per year. I just want to be good enough that in case I want to make stuff or do metal repairs, maybe I can sell it to the right buyers.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    edited August 2021 #26
    I agree with you. I wouldn’t want to go to school for certification necessarily. Just for knowledge and experience. While I’ll only be about 46 when I retire, if I don’t have to start a new career, that would be fine with me. Just pocket money to make it easier to live off my retirement and maybe fund my IRA up for later. Just an idea in my head at the moment. 

    Thinking about it, there are welding jobs all over the place. Just gotta get in the door. Apartment complexes, for example. Handrail and guardrail repairs, fence repairs, etc. same with all kinds of business. A buddy posted on social media the other day asking for someone with the ability to weld stainless steel on site for a business. Small fence and gate building jobs. Since I’ll have around a 30x40 shop soon, I’ll have the ability to fab stuff in an air conditioned shop and take it to the site to install. Like gates and decorative fences. BBQ grills and smokers... there’s all kinds of work out there for side hustle. 😎👍
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,694 Senior Member
    Stepson wants to get a welding truck and work on his own. I told him the welding is easy compared to finding/dealing with customers.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • Johnny rebJohnny reb Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    Deals can be had on used welders if you look around. The miller bobcats can be found pretty often used. They run forever and can be found really reasonable.jbp-ohio said:
    Stepson wants to get a welding truck and work on his own. I told him the welding is easy compared to finding/dealing with customers.
    The work is out there depending on what kind of work he wants to do. If that’s what he decides make sure to invest in quality equipment. A dependable vehicle is a must to get to the jobs but, I’ve seen many $70’000 trucks pull up to jobs with s*** equipment. Have decent equipment and do quality work and the truck will come. A good welder can earn well over a $100’000 a year. Depending on location and job a rig welder can make between $60-$150hr.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    I grudgingly settled for a Harbor Freight Titanium 170 mig welder, because my poor skills didn't merit anything better. It is a good machine for anyone who doesn't need a robust duty cycle, which I definitely do not. I generally spend much more time staring at work than actually doing work, so it suits me pretty well. A skilled welder can do some very nice welds with it.

    I haven't gotten around to putting in a 220v plug, so I mostly have to stick with 1/8" thickness, but the machine could handle 1/4" easily, with more voltage. I can bevel the edges and make multiple passes on thick material, but it's way too much work for an aging self-taught 'hobby' welder.

    I can have a good day occasionally, in which I make a few inches of decent looking welds that don't require me to rush to the grinder and paint before someone sees the garbage I have just created. But, unless I stay at it every day, my newly acquired skills get away from me pretty quick.

    My hardest project, to date, was rebuilding an old wood cook stove, which entirely consumed a 1/8"x4'x10' sheet of mild steel. It cooks great biscuits and chicken fried steak, so nobody complains about the crappy welds.
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    I hear those Titanium welders are pretty damn good. Especially for the cost. 

    One of the funniest things I saw lately was on a video titled “seeing what your welding.” Video was about the importance of being able to see the puddle and the edges of your weld. Good helmet, take care of your helmet, clear lenses, watching what you’re doing etc. One of the comments on the video was along the lines of “hell, I can’t weld what I’m seeing..” 🤣🤣🤣🤣
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 4,367 Senior Member
    edited August 2021 #31
    So here’s a video that happens to be about the Tig welder I bought, but I’m posting as a general introduction to their YouTube channel. I’m in no way affiliated with them and not trying to promote their channel. But they have a TON of very informative stuff. They run a welding school and do everything from side projects to showing you how to do all the different certification tests. Very technical, but very understandable. Just good stuff if you want to learn about welding. Highly suggested if you’re interested in welding. 

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