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I have an old Remington 700 in 7mm magnum that I want to restore.

Kzk5xfKzk5xf Posts: 11 New Member
It has a bump in the stock channel for the barrel right above the sling mount and it hits the barrel, I was wondering why? and if I remove it and float the barrel would accuracy improve? Stock is marked magnum stock and has a little mark in the stock forward of the receiver, looks like a little winchester mark. Thanks.

Best Answers

  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,546 Senior Member
    #2 Answer ✓
    Lot's of manufacturers would leave a little hump to create some upward pressure on the barrel at or near for fore end tip. Sometimes it works, sometimes not! I prefer free floating the barrel channel. with the recoil lug and first few inches of the barrel glass bedded! If it doesn't work, it's always easy to add the hump back in!
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,465 Senior Member
    #3 Answer ✓
    +1 on the "How does it shoot now?" question.  If it ain't broke. . .

    Forward pressure bedding of approximately 5 pounds of upward force is a time-honored method to stabilize the accuracy of barrels that are less than "target heavy"  It's the norm at the muzzle on a number of famous military rifles, and at the nose cap of the stock on a lot of sporters.

    If you're grouping anything around an inch at 100 yards with the action screws torqued down to 35 inch pounds on a wood stock, probably best just to leave it be.  Test that, before going nuts.

    If you decide to free float and bed it, my SOP is to bed forward of the recoil lug about the length of a cartridge.  My unscientific reasoning for this is that competition barrels with what is known as a "Palma taper" are pretty much straight cylinders out of the receiver for about the length of a round, where they then taper sharply over an inch or three, then free float to infinity.  That first untapered bit is bedded to support the weight of the longer than norm target barrel and prevent flex.  Not a big issue on a hunting weight gun, but the practice is sound and has done well for me.

    I usually hog out the barrel channel so the barrel still free floats with a couple thicknesses of wide PVC tape laid on lengthwise from where I want my bedding to contact the barrel forward of the recoil lug.  I then bed the whole channel and the tape creates the gap for the free float. 

    If the free float ends up not working for you, you then have to recreate the forward pressure bed by creating a mold on the barrel for a pad of bedding material. About half an inch wide by one inch long should do.  I would probably use the same PVC tape I did the barrel channel with, but never having needed to do that step yet, that's just my best guess.  You put the bedding goo in with the rifle upside down in a cradle and hang a five pound dumb bell from the muzzle to create the gap for the goo to fill into.

    The solid black Pachmayr Decelerator is my go-to for a bolt gun recoil pad.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Kzk5xfKzk5xf Posts: 11 New Member
    #4 Answer ✓
    Jayhawker said:
    How does it shoot now? I've seen more than one rifle turn into a nightmare trying to tighten up groups that were already acceptable...
    I havent shot it yet.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,465 Senior Member
    #5 Answer ✓
    Kzk5xf said:
    Jayhawker said:
    How does it shoot now? I've seen more than one rifle turn into a nightmare trying to tighten up groups that were already acceptable...
    I havent shot it yet.
    Yup.  Better to find out first.  Remington pretty much drove the classic Winchesters off the market with their barreling system.  For the most part, it works VERY well.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,161 Senior Member
    #6 Answer ✓
    Doing a little range work to discover what the rifle likes and what it doesn't  would be a good place to start...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,545 Senior Member
    #7 Answer ✓
    Good call
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,486 Senior Member
    edited February 1 #8 Answer ✓
    You don’t need the serial number.  There is a set of letters stamped on the barrel by the receiver on the left side (side away from the ejection port).  That’s what you go by.

    First letter is the month, second letter(s) is the year.

    B - Jan L - Feb A - Mar C - Apr K - May P - Jun 
    O - Jul W - Aug D - Sep E - Oct R - Nov X - Dec 

    M - 1921 N - 1922 P - 1923 R - 1924 S - 1925 
    T - 1926 U - 1927 W - 1928 X - 1929 Y - 1930 
    Z - 1931 A - 1932 B - 1933 C - 1934 D - 1935 
    E - 1936 F - 1937 G - 1938 H - 1939 J - 1940 
    K - 1941 L - 1942 MM - 1943 NN - 1944 PP - 1945 
    RR - 1946 SS - 1947 TT - 1948 UU - 1949 WW - 1950 
    XX - 1951 YY - 1952 ZZ - 1953 A - 1954 B - 1955 
    C - 1956 D - 1957 E - 1958 F - 1959 G - 1960 
    H - 1961 J - 1962 K - 1963 L - 1964 M - 1965 
    N - 1966 P - 1967 R - 1968 S - 1969 T - 1970 
    U - 1971 W - 1972 X - 1973 Y - 1974 Z - 1975 
    I - 1976 O - 1977 Q - 1978 V - 1979 A - 1980 
    B - 1981 C - 1982 D - 1983 E - 1984 F - 1985 
    G - 1986 H - 1987 I - 1988 J - 1989 K - 1990 
    L - 1991 M - 1992 N - 1993 O - 1994 P - 1995 
    Q - 1996 R - 1997 S - 1998 T - 1999 (*) U - 2000 (*) 
    V - 2001 (*) W - 2002 X - 2003 Y - 2004 Z - 2005 
    A - 2006 B - 2007 C - 2008 D - 2009 E - 2010 
    F - 2011 G - 2012 H - 2013 I - 2014 
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬

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