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Newt's "Janitor" Comment "Non-Political"

DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior MemberNear St. LouisPosts: 3,395 Senior Member
This is not a political post, but a life lesson. Recently, Newt came under fire when he suggested kids work as janitors. This set off a firestorm because too many people (the stupid ones) believe Janitor jobs are largely undesirable positions and relegated to the unfortunates in society who cannot advance to a higher occupation.

When I was in High School, there was a man in our church who was a janitor at my school. He was a quiet, unassuming man who was raising a family and working as a night janitor. My dad had huge respect for this man because while he was working as a janitor, he was also taking night classes to get his High School diploma as he'd dropped out some years back. Well, he got his diploma. It was a secret I knew and never told any of my class mates as I didn't want to embarrass him.

Well, he went on to go to college at night, all the while continuing to be a janitor. Eventually getting his college degree in education. He became a teacher at my old high school and never pushed a broom again. Before he retired for good, those of us who knew him, were overjoyed to see him become Principal of that High School! He served in that capacity for a number of years and I'd bet none of his students knew he'd been a janitor there for 10 years!

So, I think Old Newt has a pretty good idea, but our "want it now" generation can't work had for what they want. They want it with minimum effort. This man did what the "American Dream" empowered him to do. I wish I could somehow get the word out.

Dan
It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain

Replies

  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Global NomadPosts: 6,071 Senior Member
    I worked as a janitor for awhile after high school before my old school's junior college section threw a bunch of scholarships at me. Life wasn't that bad. I'm tired of hearing this "underemployed" crap because people who were stupid enough to go to college and major in "Romantic 18th Century Literature" and similar, and expect to start out at $60K or higher working in their field.

    I know a petroleum engineering major who got hired by Exxon while still in college starting at $65K a year, with student loan repayment as well. Bet all those OWS clowns wish they had rethought their chosen studies.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • NyGunownerNyGunowner Banned Posts: 328 Member
    When i was in second grade, my mom decided she wanted to take me out of public school and put me in catholic school. This was seen then as a far better eduction. So starting in third grade I was in Catholic school. When I got to fifth grade, dad had been laid off, quit or fired yet again (his job cycle seemed to be about 18 mos then) and we couldn't afford books or the modest tuition charged members of the parish congregation.

    All was not lost. Since I was TEN YEARS OLD, and we were "low income" (mom would always say TOO POOR) the school had a program where I could work in the cafeteria, running the big old tray fed dishwasher, a job that needed to be done right or the dishes came through dirty. I not only got books and tuition, but a free hot lunch, which was a delicacy compared to the PBJ I normally carried 4 of 5 days a week. I was excused from class a bit before lunch and allowed to come back to class late, missing MAYBE an hour of class time a day, half of that after lunch recess.

    Far from demeaning, I saw it as a privledge. I had a JOB, and if I learned anything, it was how to overcome obstacles through work, and to make up for any class time missed. I still got my 92-95 average, and it damned sure didn't hurt me any. AAMOF if anything, some of the "rich" (read that not poor enough) kids envied me because I got to cut out of class just as we were diagramming sentences each day, and I got to eat at the "workers" table with the adult employees of the school.

    Newt knows poor kids not only lack money, but many also lack VALUES needed to understand how to overcome obstacles by sustained diligent work. The program fixes both issues.

    The lesson stuck well enough for me that at age 12 I had a morning paper route, up at 5AM every day to make "my own" money, and by 14 I worked a summer with a fellow building a house, helping with every aspect from cellar to paint. I learned the bliss of bone tired sleep and the satisfaction of folding money in my pocket.

    Now, I gotta get off here. Back when the economy was good, I'd often go to country auctions and buy small antique items that I either sold or stashed "for a rainy day." Had I not done so, the extra cash might well have been piddled away. As it is, the stuff became a "CD" of sorts, less liquid, but appreciating more than cash in a savings account. This week I'm gonna blow some of it through an auction. I've already sold a few items, averaging a hair over 100% profit in five years. These are the lessons "poor" kids CAN be taught.....
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    I know a petroleum engineering major who got hired by Exxon while still in college starting at $65K a year, with student loan repayment as well. Bet all those OWS clowns wish they had rethought their chosen studies.

    B-b-bu-but that's an EVIL profession there!!! How could you ever LOOK UP to this guy!?!? [sarcasm/off]

    I have a friend - county sherrif's deputy who also works alongside my department in the hospital for security staffing - who is absolutely adamant about the OWS's claimed "99%" being more like 43%, and says that when the 43% "entitled" leeching off the 57% working taxpayers becomes 51%, he's quitting.
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Lake County, FloridaPosts: 7,927 Senior Member
    My first job was in a diner...cleaning the grease trap, sweeping, mopping floors and wiping tables. Not much different than janitorial work.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Pensacola, FLPosts: 10,826 Senior Member
    My first job was digging a latrine pit for an old Merchant Marine. After that was done, we hand dug a leech field for a septic....

    I would have rather pushed a broom!
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    I'm tired of hearing this "underemployed" crap because people who were stupid enough to go to college and major in "Romantic 18th Century Literature" and similar, and expect to start out at $60K or higher working in their field.
    ...The Romantic period was in the 19th Century (not that I am currently studying 19th Century rhetoric at the moment or anything). A large problem is that people are led to believe that a classical liberal arts education and job training are the same thing. They are not. There is a difference between being educated and trained. If you are looking for job training, find a trade school or get a technical degree. Anyway, after running my own business for 17 years and running other people's for another 5, I can study whatever the hell that I want. But yea, if people get into that for the money, they are in for a rude awakening.

    That said, hard work never killed anyone. I did the paper route thing and picked sweet corn and tomatoes in the summer. When I was a teen and young adult, I worked in fast food. I would do it again if I needed to.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • NNNN Senior Member NCPosts: 25,221 Senior Member
    I did some of that type of work at a summer camp, now look at me; I'm classified as unemployable.

    Dug holes, footings, and trenches, also. ----never got trench foot either, did get a hole in my foot once.
  • dlkdlk Member Posts: 419 Member
    A few months ago I was reading the help wanted ads, and somebody posted one that, after all the usual info said, "must WANT to work". I kinda chuckled at that until I remembered a couple of younger people I had watched rotate through my old workplace that my boss had said "He don't wanna work."
    STEALTH COMPETENT

    I know what I'm doing, it just doesn't look like it.
  • Bham ShooterBham Shooter Senior Member Posts: 609 Senior Member
    My first summer job was working for a plumbing and A/C supply place. Working in a large steaming hot warehouse in south Alabama in July. And then about 3-4 times a day we'd have to go to the second level of the place, where the thermometer read north of 130 on some days. And that wasn't taking stairs, it was climbing an old ladder, then carrying back down whatever part you were pulling. Unloading a flatbed full of metal pipes and placing them, by size, by hand, into the large racks. The highlight of my day was getting chosen for a delivery, in the old compact pickup that had no air conditioning. I'd rather push a broom and mop and clean the dirtiest of bathrooms than work in the heat like that. At least the janitor isn't out in the sun. It definitely teaches you about hard work and motivation.
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Somewhere north of MozambiquePosts: 6,637 Senior Member
    I'm not sure why, but I hear many parents saying things like: "I don't want my kid to work." To which I reply: "Why not?!" They seem to feel that a job would cause their sweeties to grow up too quickly, or maybe that the sort of jobs they could do might be beneath them somehow. Frankly, I don't get it. Like others, I had a paper route as a kid, and I held several jobs all through high school. Now, I'm not saying kids should be knocking down 60+ hours per week, but working a few hours at night or on weekends never killed anybody.
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Dellrose TNPosts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Those same parents can't understand why the kid wants to live under their roof into his mid-30's, accumulate huge college loan debt, and never get a decent job- - - - -they've trained him not to work!
    Jerry
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Living in a van, down by the river.Posts: 14,033 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I got fed up enough to ask a manager at Burger King why there was not one native English speaking person behind the counter and his answer was "I can't find any to hire. None ever apply even though I have the hiring sign up all the time"... I asked about high school kids and he told me that the few that had actually applied in the last few years did not want to clean bathrooms, sweep and mop floors or do any of the dirty work. Hummmm...

    I'd blame the parents for the high schooler's resistance to working in such jobs. They're taught that such jobs are "menial" and therefore "beneath them," that they can "do so much better." With their parents teaching them that, is it any wonder they won't work the jobs?
    I'm just here for snark.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Global NomadPosts: 6,071 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I got fed up enough to ask a manager at Burger King why there was not one native English speaking person behind the counter and his answer was "I can't find any to hire. None ever apply even though I have the hiring sign up all the time"... I asked about high school kids and he told me that the few that had actually applied in the last few years did not want to clean bathrooms, sweep and mop floors or do any of the dirty work. Hummmm...

    Funny story, sort of: I have an open job offer anytime I want at a firewood business in Lubbock TX because when I worked there for a Christmas break, I was the first high school aged kid they'd ever had who didn't leave at lunch break on day 1. That guy was by far the best boss I've ever had. Being willing to do the dirty work opens up doors later.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • NyGunownerNyGunowner Banned Posts: 328 Member
    Funny story, sort of: I have an open job offer anytime I want at a firewood business in Lubbock TX because when I worked there for a Christmas break, I was the first high school aged kid they'd ever had who didn't leave at lunch break on day 1. That guy was by far the best boss I've ever had. Being willing to do the dirty work opens up doors later.

    When I was 17I worked TWO 36 hour a week "Quarter over minimum" jobs, and even then took an odd shift as a dishwasher at a banquet hall now and then. The first time I worked there, scrubbing pots and pans, the owner's wife was in charge of the "back end" and upon hearing I'd been going at it 4 or 5 hours straight,came back to the galley and saw me scrubbing furiously as the outside of a blackened pot. "Don't work so hard. It's OK" she said, laying a hand on my shoulder. I didn't KNOW any other way. In the construction or farm helper jobs I got as a kid, we "made hay while the sun shined" because once it rained you were out of luck. It was simply the way it was....
    My own kid got a taste of that at 15, when we totally stripped and re-roofed the house. We had about a 4 day window in the weather and worked hard, long hours to GIT-R-DUN. He wants to be a doctor. If he makes it there, I think these early experiences will serve him well when his eyeballs are about falling out and yet another trauma comes through the door or some such. Ya GOT TO know what yer made of to get through those days.
  • NyGunownerNyGunowner Banned Posts: 328 Member
    oops doubletap!
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Living in a van, down by the river.Posts: 14,033 Senior Member
    Never did that.

    However, I have:
    worked at a marina doing general land clearing and dock repair
    spent many a summer mowing lawns at the place of business of family members
    worked construction, going from laborer to site supervisor
    been a janitor at the gym when I was in college, getting some derision from the preppies who worked the desk
    worked at Scotty's in the lumberyard and in sales
    I'm just here for snark.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Western PAPosts: 8,233 Senior Member
    I had a JOB, and if I learned anything, it was how to overcome obstacles through work

    This is the point. Kids are not made to overcome obstacles because they are babied at home and people at school tell them they have rights to not do anything. I see it at boy scouts a lot. They mostly get disabused of that notion or quit.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
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