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Ruger barrels..."steel alloy"?

AntonioAntonio Senior MemberLima, PeruPosts: 2,986 Senior Member
After lots of years, Ruger's M77 centerfire rifles have been reintroduced to our market and local folks are wondering what this "steel alloy" terminology means. Any hints? Just plain merchandising? Any "secret ingredients"?

Replies

  • calebibcalebib Senior Member ColoradoPosts: 1,701 Senior Member
    All modern steels are alloys of some sort. Chromium, nickel, molybdenum, etc. are all common additives to steel to achieve the desired properties.
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Texas Gulf CoastPosts: 2,854 Senior Member
    Steel IS an alloy, it's iron and additives.
  • calebibcalebib Senior Member ColoradoPosts: 1,701 Senior Member
    Yes, steel at its most basic is iron and carbon.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Lima, PeruPosts: 2,986 Senior Member
    Thanks...yes, I know but people over here were asking if such so-called "alloy" will mean that the barrels have a lower life expectancy or something like that. Many have shot surplused corrosive ammo in their hunting/sporting rifles without knowing it or even knowing how to properly clean them, so excessive wear due to corrosion even after the standard cleaning method was, according to them, due to "poor barrel material quality"...go figure.
  • gunrunner428gunrunner428 Senior Member Posts: 1,018 Senior Member
    Yep, shooting corrosive ammo means you have to clean your gun pretty much immediately after firing. Even some mil-spec loads with non-corrosive powder were loaded with corrosive primers - so letting ol' Betsy or Lil' Miss Sureshot sit around for a week or a month after the range session before breaking out the solvents and brushes will definitely result in a loss of barrel life.

    Even stainless steel will rust - I witnessed personally a T/C Thunderhawk (early in-line muzzeloader) that was so rusted its bolt was FUSED with the rest of the action - and yes, the owner wanted a new muzzleloader from the shop or from T/C because "It's defective, stainless steel isn't supposed to rust!" Sighted in, hunted with, and left - found in this condition in the late summer as the next round of sight-in was going to happen.
  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member VirginiaPosts: 8,337 Senior Member
    I think a large part of the issue is that the term "alloy" has been too-often linked to Zamac and other cheap cast stuff in certain firearms that will break if you stare at it hard.

    I wouldn't be concerned in the least about Ruger's "alloy" steel.
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Texas Gulf CoastPosts: 2,854 Senior Member
    Antonio wrote: »
    Thanks...yes, I know but people over here were asking if such so-called "alloy" will mean that the barrels have a lower life expectancy or something like that. Many have shot surplused corrosive ammo in their hunting/sporting rifles without knowing it or even knowing how to properly clean them, so excessive wear due to corrosion even after the standard cleaning method was, according to them, due to "poor barrel material quality"...go figure.

    Steel is not a new discovery and the requirements for the steel used in gun barrels is well understood by the gun makers and the barrel makers. Further, of all the gun making companies, Ruger has been at the forefront of the use of stainles steel and then also make their own hammer-forged barrels to their own specs. If there is a gun company that I trust to pick the proper steel, it would be Ruger.

    That said, any steel, and that includes stainless (which is really "stain-resistant",) will be damaged by the use of corrosive primers IF the barrel is not cleaned immediately after then end of the shooting session. This usually requires cleaning the bore with hot water, followed by regular cleaning.
  • AiredaleAiredale Banned Posts: 624 Senior Member
    The guys are all right. Steel is an alloy, not a pure metal.
    As far as I know, Ruger has outsourced rifle barrels for years and still does.
    Jim
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Texas Gulf CoastPosts: 2,854 Senior Member
    Airedale wrote: »
    The guys are all right. Steel is an alloy, not a pure metal.
    As far as I know, Ruger has outsourced rifle barrels for years and still does.
    Jim

    You might want to read this.
    http://technology.calumet.purdue.edu/met/higley/Precision%20Shooting%20Magazine%20-%20November-%202005%20(Vol_%2053%20-%20No_%207).htm
  • AiredaleAiredale Banned Posts: 624 Senior Member
    I asked Ruger about this a while back because of an accuracy issue in a .257 Roberts of their manufacture. They replied that they had been outsourcing their barrels for a number of years.
    It's understandable to me that Ruger can't do everything, after all, they're a mass produced manufacturer. They can't do everything like a custom rifle maker can.
    They make a pretty good firearm, nontheless.
    Jim
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    With gun barrels the metal can't be too hard, or it can't be machined, it will chip instead and the bore would be too rough, they call it "Ordnance grade steel" Neither too hard nor too soft.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Lima, PeruPosts: 2,986 Senior Member
    Thanks for your inputs; I'm a faithful Ruger customer (Single Six, Blackhawk, Mini-14 and even a 10/22 for a while) and can testify their price/quality ratio is excellent. Will pass down all this data to the dubious local crowd.
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Texas Gulf CoastPosts: 2,854 Senior Member
    Airedale wrote: »
    I asked Ruger about this a while back because of an accuracy issue in a .257 Roberts of their manufacture. They replied that they had been outsourcing their barrels for a number of years.
    It's understandable to me that Ruger can't do everything, after all, they're a mass produced manufacturer. They can't do everything like a custom rifle maker can.
    They make a pretty good firearm, nontheless.
    Jim

    I just called Ruger this morning and talked with a very nice lady in the service department. My question was: "Does Ruger make their own hammer-forged barrels?" The answer was "We make ALL our own barrels, rifles and pistols."
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Good work !!

    I am glad to hear it.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Texas Gulf CoastPosts: 2,854 Senior Member
    Thanks. I just thought we needed to put a stop to incorrect information.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Yes !!
    Very true.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • AiredaleAiredale Banned Posts: 624 Senior Member
    Maybe they make all their barrels at this date, but that's not what I was told a couple of years ago.
    Jim
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