Browning high power mark 3 questions.....

ChuckXXChuckXX BannedPosts: 103 Member
Hi Everyone; I was wondering if anyone out there owns one of these beautys???? If so what do you like most about it??? Also is there a company out there that makes some nice "fancy white checkered grips" for it??? I thought that would really dress it up. I don't own one but am thinking seriously about buying one. I had the standard model way back in the middle 70's. Of course being young and dumb I sold it. Any info that you can offer will be GREATLY APPPRECIATED. Thank You. ChuckXX PS You won't hurt my feelings if you don't like this pistol but I would like to know WHY???? Thanks again.

Replies

  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    The original Browning HP is a most elegant handgun, even the clones are ok, I only object to the ugly lettering on some of those clones.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,051 Senior Member
    Ms 3 has the cast frame, which is oddly enough tougher than the original forged. It can handle higher pressure loads, but I'd still reccomend using a higher poundage recoil spring (18 lb.) to handle the ammo better and avoid frame battering.

    The Hi Power has a short tang on the backstrap, and with some hands (like mine) it combines withe the hammer to cause hammer bite. With a spur hammer you can slightly bob the hammer if that's a problem, with a burr you can do some other doctoring.

    Mk 3s have larger thumb safeties, whether you need the ambidextrous feature is really debatable. They do have much better sights, so that's a plus.

    The thin frontstrap of the Hi Power doesn't lend itself to coarser checkering, so most folks use fine checkering or stippling if you want a frontstrap treatment.

    If I remember correctly you had issues with a Wilson 1911ish pistol in 9mm regarding reassembly? Yeah, the Hi Power takes down and goes back together basically the same way.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,945 Senior Member
    There's stuff I like about the Hi-Power and stuff I don't like about the Hi-Power.

    It's light for an all-steel gun, the balance is wonderful, it's single action only, and (so I understand), the new version is much more hot-ammo friendly than previous variants.

    The first down side is the magazine disconnect. Bad enough that it's even there, but it rubs against the face of the magazine every time the trigger is pulled. The finish of every magazine you have can alter your trigger pull, as can how the magazine locks up or is wiggled around by your hand.

    The trigger mechanism itself is stupidly inefficient. Inserting a magazine pivots the magazine disconnect into its "shootable" position. Pulling the trigger raises this bar upwards where it can push upwards on the front a pivoting bar up inside the slide. The rear of this bar pivots downward as a result and presses on the sear to release the hammer. So, in pressing the trigger, you transfer force from your finger to the frame, up to the slide, back down to the frame, and back up to the slide again in the form of the hammer strike. Compare this to the more typical approach of the hammer strike (and possibly disengagement of a firing pin block) being the only frame to slide transfer of force. The big flaw here is that play between the slide and frame translates to additional variability in the trigger pull.

    It's a decent enough combat gun, but John Browning was obviously dead a long time before they finalized the mechanism. It ain't a 1911 by a long shot.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    There are many handguns that could be perfect if only they had been designed with a simpler better SA trigger for C&L carry.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,051 Senior Member
    True. If they had gone with a situation similar to how Para Ordnance did the trigger arrangement (without the silly Series 80 stuff) the Hi Power would have a much better trigger, IMHO.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    Well after reading the posts of Breamfisher and BigSlug I will admit that Iam now not so excited about spending the $1059 for the Browning Hi Power Mark 3. Yes, Iam the guy who had all the trouble with the Wilson 1911. But Iam not worried about the "disassembly" of the Browning. I actually had one back in the 70's. They are very easy to take apart and put back togethor. I had a revolver once in my life that had terrible "hammer bite". It was a Casull 454. NEVER AGAIN. That friggin revolver came back so "VIOLENTLY" that the hammer rammmed up against the webbing of my hand and the next thing I know I was bleeding like a stuck pig. But that was along time ago and it certainly was not a Browning Hi Power. My Browning from the 70's never did that to me. I shot that pistol easily over a thousand times and had no problem with it in that regard. Like I say, Iam now kinda "lukewarm" on buying the Browning Hi Power Mark 3.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,945 Senior Member
    Just buy a 9mm 1911 Chuck. We'll be standing by to get you dialed in on the process without you needing to resort to warm milk, blue blankets, teddy bears and thumb-sucking. Soon enough, you'll be DETAIL stripping one, and then I can finally approve your citizenship application.

    And YES, that IS a challenge :jester:
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Mind you, a gunsmith can remove the magazine safety and do a trigger job on a BHP that will make a huge difference and solve all of it's ills.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,353 Senior Member
    I'm rather fond of the BHP and have had a few over the years. My current night stand version is an Argentine licensed copy. I've done a bit of work to it and it needs only new sights on the slide to make it carry ready. As for removing the mag safety and doing a trigger job, it's really not that difficult to enhance the let off to acceptable levels at home on the kitchen table, if you're willing to make a few mods. The hammer spring is way too heavy. One can easily remove a few coils on it and keep the pistol 100% reliable. By doing this, it removes some of the force necessary to disengage the sear. My trigger is now about 5 pounds which many would consider heavy, but there's no creep or over travel so it's crisp. I've tightened the slide to frame fit with judicious peening and stoning and my 25 yard groups reduced from 4" to 2.5" (keep in mind, it was pretty sloppy upon receipt and a new BHP wouldn't need this.)

    109_0939.jpg
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • ChuckXXChuckXX Banned Posts: 103 Member
    I'm rather fond of the BHP and have had a few over the years. My current night stand version is an Argentine licensed copy. I've done a bit of work to it and it needs only new sights on the slide to make it carry ready. As for removing the mag safety and doing a trigger job, it's really not that difficult to enhance the let off to acceptable levels at home on the kitchen table, if you're willing to make a few mods. The hammer spring is way too heavy. One can easily remove a few coils on it and keep the pistol 100% reliable. By doing this, it removes some of the force necessary to disengage the sear. My trigger is now about 5 pounds which many would consider heavy, but there's no creep or over travel so it's crisp. I've tightened the slide to frame fit with judicious peening and stoning and my 25 yard groups reduced from 4" to 2.5" (keep in mind, it was pretty sloppy upon receipt and a new BHP wouldn't need this.)

    109_0939.jpg

    Dan; Thats a nice looking pistol. Thank you for replying.
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